Assessment Report for cot4810 cot 4810: Topics in Computer Science (Spring 2011) Designation



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Assessment Report for COT4810

COT 4810: Topics in Computer Science (Spring 2011)

Designation: Required for BSCS program.
Catalog Description:

A range of topics from the field of computer science. Applications of oral and written communication skills. Social, ethical and moral issues of computing.


Pre-requisite and/or Co-requisite Course(s):

COP 3402, COP 3503, and COT 3960 (Foundation Exam)


Textbook(s) (recommended/not required):

[1]Ethics for the Information Age, 3rd edition by Michael J. Quinn, Addison Wesley, 2009, ISBN: 0-321-53685-3.

[2]The New Turing Omnibus by A. K. Dewdney, Owl books, 1993, ISBN: 0-8050-7166-0
References: (the links to the papers were provided on the class Web site)

Required reading: How to give a talk

Turing awards - http://awards.acm.org/homepage.cfm?awd=140

Classical papers

Computational models: Turing, Turing-correction

Early computers: UNIVAC-report, vonNeuman- Probabilistic Logic

Programming languages: Hoare, Backus,

Distributed systems: “Distributed snapshots: determining the global states of distributed systems” by K. Mani Chandy and Leslie Lamport

Survey papers

Algorithms: Local Ratio Approximation Algorithms, Approximate String Matching,



Designing Programs that Check their Work, External Memory Algorithms

Architecture: Processor with Explicit Multi-threading, Networks on a Chip, Power Reduction of Microprocessors,



Reconfigurable Computing, Cellular Automata

Collaboration networks: Newman

Compiling: Just in Time (JIT) Compilation

Distributed systems: Group Communication, Publish-subscribe Paradigm, Access Control in Collaborative Systems, Roll Back Recovery Protocols

Future challenges: Gordon Bell’s talk

Models: Modeling Time in Computing

Networking and Ad-hoc Networks: Packet Classification Techniques, Anonymity Communication,

Peer-to-peer Contents Distribution, Overlay Networks,

Topology Control in Ad-hoc Networks

Novel paradigms: Introduction to Quantum Computing, Quantum Cryptography

Novel applications: Computer Systems for Music, Face Recognition, Bioinformatics

Programming languages: Data Flow Programming Languages,

Security: Key Management for Secure Communication, Denial of Service Attacks

Sensor: Sensor Networks Survey, OS for Sensor Networks, Sensor Networks Security,



Information Fusion in Sensor Networks,

Utility computing, grids, and clouds: Berkeley Report, Data Grids

Web: Web Metrics, Replication for Web Hosting, Web Page Classification, Web Cache Replacement Strategies

“Algorithms design and analysis techniques” by E.M. Reingold, in Algorithm and Theory of Computation Handbook, Edited by M.K. Atallah, CRC Press, 1999, ISBN 0-8493-2649-4.

“Consistent global states of distributed systems; fundamental concepts and mechanisms” by O. Babaoaglu and K. Marzullo. In Distributed Systems, Edited by Sape Mullender, pp. 55-94, Addison-Wesley, 1993, ISBN 0-2-1-62427-3.

“Authentication in distributed systems” by Butler Lampson. In Distributed Systems, Edited by Sape Mullender, pp. 543-579, Addison-Wesley, 1993, ISBN 0-2-1-62427-3.



Course Outcomes and Measures

Course Outcome & Measures

Mapping to
Program Outcomes


Performance

Criteria

Outcome 1: To enhance professional oral communication skills of every student in the class. Each student gives an extended, 50 minutes, presentation and answers questions related to the paper (s) presented. Measures the oral skills in

  1. the presentation

  2. the answers to questions related to the presentation

#5,#6, #7

Two thirds of the class should receive 80% or better on their presentations.


Outcome 2: To enhance professional written communication skills of every student in the class. Students write two final papers and provide reviews of the paper(s) and evaluations of the presentation. They are asked to:

  1. provide a review of the paper(s) including ethics and technological changes issues;

  2. analyze the depth of the technical discussion;

  3. evaluate the clarity of the presentation;

  4. evaluate the interaction with the audience and the answers to the questions;

  5. provide additional comments and suggestions for improvements.

Measures the writing skills exhibited in the:

  1. two final papers, one on ethics and the other on effects of social impact of information science and technology;

  2. 34 reviews of the papers presented by other students and the written evaluations of the other students.

#5, #6, #7

Two thirds of the class should receive 80 or better on the summary papers and the written evaluation forms.

Outcome 3: To understand the process of technological changes in the society and the role of computer science. The students are required to read the relevant papers related to each presentation, comment on the process of technological changes in the society and the role of computer science, and write a final paper. Measures the quality of the:

  1. final paper on social impact of information science and technology.

  2. written review of the papers covering technological changes.

#6,#7

Two thirds of the class should receive 80% or better on the final paper covering the process of technological changes in the society and the role of computer science.

Outcome 4: To understand the basic ethical and professional issues inherent in the discipline of computing. To enhance student ability to objectively evaluate a presentation. The students are required to read the relevant papers related to each presentation, comment on the ethical and professional issues inherent in the discipline of computing, and write a final paper. Measures the quality of the:

  1. final paper on the ethics.

  2. written review of the papers covering ethical aspects of computer science.

#5,#6

Two thirds of the class should receive 80% or better on the paper


Quality Goal: 50% of all students who receive 70% or above shall meet or exceed the assessment threshold for each Course Assessment Outcome.
Relationship of the course to the Degree Program Outcomes:


  • BSCS Degree Program, Outcome 5: Demonstrate an understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and responsibilities. CAC(e) (maps to course outcome #4 )

  • BSCS Degree Program, Outcome 6: Communicate effectively with a range of audiences; in particular, graduating majors shall demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills while disseminating technical information about computing technology and its applications. CAC (f) (maps to course outcomes #1 and #2 )

  • BSCS Degree Program, Outcome 7: Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations and society. CAC(g) (maps to course outcomes #3 )

Relationship of the course to CAC Outcomes:


Course Outcomes

CAC Outcomes

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

j

k

1















x















2















x
















3


















x













4













x



















Course Content and Assessment Plan

Assignment

Purpose

Outcome

Performance Criteria

Oral presentation and answers to questions

60 % of the final grade



Test student ability to expose clearly the technical ideas of one or more papers. To test their intellectual curiosity and ability to select relevant papers for the presentation.

#1

Half of the class should get 85% or better

Written

30% of the final grade



To test students’ written skills and knowledge of the subject.

#2

Two thirds should receive 85 or better

The final paper on the social impact of computer science 5% of final grade

To test student’s understanding of the social impact of technological changes and the role of computer science

#3

Two thirds should receive 90 or better

The final paper on ethics.

5% of final grade



To test students understanding of ethics in computer science

#4

Two thirds should receive 85 or better

Topics Covered (the class Web site provides links to the presentations and to other documents used for the presentation).

Chris Rees  – Allan Kay and his work; 2003 Turing Award Recipient (Monday, January 18, 2011)

       Presentation - Allan Kay

      Allan Kay Biography

      Small Talk History

      A conversation with Allen Kay

 

   Peter Tonner – John Mc. Carthy and his work; 1971 Turing Award Recipient (Friday, January 21, 2011)



       Presentation – John Mc. Carthy

       Recursive Functions

       Programs with Common Sense

       Epistemological Problems of Artificial Intelligence

       Some Philosophical Problems from the Standpoint of Artificial Intelligence

 

    Shehan Sirigampola – Access Control in Collaborative Systems (Monday, January 24 2011)



       Presentation

       Access Control in Collaborative Systems

          

    Andrew Harmic – Computer Ethics and Cyber Law (Wednesday, January 26, 2011)

       Presentation

       Computer and Information Ethics (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

       Digital Millennium Copyright Act

 

     Jeff Corbell  – Designing Programs that Check Themselves (Friday, January 28, 2011)



       Presentation

       Designing Programs that Check Themselves

 

     Lisa Soros – A Cognitive Agent Architecture (Monday, January 31, 2011)



        Presentation

        IDA -  A  Cognitive Agent Architecture

 

     Thomas Kafalas – Intellectual Property (Wednesday, February 2, 2011)



        Presentation

        The Future of Intellectual Property

        Protecting Intellectual Property in Digital Multimedia Networks

        Protecting Intellectual Property Rights through Information Policy

 

     Wilfredo Velazquez – Techniques and Structures in Concurrent Programming (Friday, February 4, 2011)



             Presentation

             Concurrent Programming without Locks

             DCAS is not a Silver Bullet for Non-blocking Algorithm Design

             The Art of Multiprocessor Programming

 

          Joshua Michalczak –  Massive Data Storage (Monday, February 07, 2011)



              Presentation

              The Google File System

 

          Anthony Lora – Cellular Automata (Wednesday, February 09, 2011)



                Presentation

                Cellular Automaton

       Cellular Automata Laboratory

                Wolfram MathWorld

 

          Timothy Goldberg – Power Reduction of Microprocessors (Friday, February 11, 2011)



                Presentation

                Power Reduction of Microprocessors

 

           Benjamin Gamble –  Modeling Time in Computing (Monday, February 14, 2011)



                 Presentation

                 Modeling Time in Computing: a Taxonomy and a Comparative Survey

 

           Jon Leonard – Space-based Partitioning Data Structures and Algorithms (Wednesday, February 16, 2011)



                 Presentation

                 The Quadtree and Related Hierarchical Data Structures

                 Front-to-Back Display of BSP Trees

                 The Priority R-Tree: A Practically Efficient and Worst-Case Optimal R-Trees

                 On Constructing Binary Space Partitioning Trees

 

           Justin Wiseman – Approximate String Matching (Friday, February 18, 2011)



                Presentation

                A Guided Tour to Approximate String Matching

 

            Pierre LaBorde – Split-Ordered Lists (Monday, February 21, 2011)



                 Presentation

                 Split-Ordered Lists: Lock-Free Extensible Hash Tables

 

           Erin Collins – The Publish/Subscribe Paradigm (Wednesday, February 23, 2011)



                Presentation

                The Many Faces of Publish/Subscribe

                Publish/Subscribe Communication Systems

 

           Joshua Eberhardt – Distributed Snapshots (Friday, February, 25, 2011)



               Presentation

               Distributes Snapshots; Determining Global States of Distributed Systems

 

           Philip Jameson – Group Communication (Monday, February 28, 2011)



               Presentation

               Group Communication

 

            Robert Bieber – Functional Programming (Wednesday, March 2, 2011)



                Presentation

                Can Programming be Liberated from the von Neumann Style?

 

            Keith W. Krajewski – Just-in-Time Compilation (Friday, March 4, 2011)



                Presentation

                A Brief History of JIT

 

            Robert Stewart – An Axiomatic Basis for Computer Programming (Monday, March 14, 2011)



                Presentation

                An Axiomatic Basis for Computer Programming

 

             Tsu-Wei Kuo – Peer-to-peer Systems (Wednesday, March 16, 2011)



                 Presentation

                 Peer-to-peer Contents Distribution 

 

             Jeremy Mayeres  – 4th Generation Wireless Systems (Friday, March 18, 2011)



                 Presentation

                 On theWay towards Fourth-GenerationMobile: 3GPP LTE and LTE-Advanced  

            An Overview of Next-Generation Mobile WiMAX Technology    

             IMT-Advanced - Objective and Challenges

 

             Danielle Frantz – Musical Expression no Longer Exclusively Human (Monday, March 21, 2011)   



                  Presentation 

                  A Survey of Computer Systems for Expressive Music Performance

                  IQX Plays Chopin

                  Neural Network Based Systems for Computer-Aided Composition

 

             Corey Pittman – Wireless Sensor Networks (Wednesday, March 23, 2011)



                  Presentation

                  Wireless Sensor Networks

 

              Michael Scherer – Information Fusion for Wireless Sensor Networks (Friday, March 25, 2011)



                   Presentation

                   Information Fusion for Wireless Sensor Networks

 

              Diego Velasquez – Face Recognition (Monday, March 28, 2011)



                   Presentation

                   Face Recognition: A Literature Survey

                   Preliminary Face Recognition Grand Challenge Results

 

               Jordan Deveroux – Defending Against Denial of Service Attacks (Wednesday, March 30, 2011)



                   Presentation

                   Survey of Network-Based Defense Mechanisms Countering the DoS and DDoS Problems

 

               Kylie Brown – Cryptology (Friday, April 1, 2011)



                    Presentation

 

               Garrett Lund – Key Management for Secure Communication (Monday, April 4, 2011)



                    Presentation

                    Key Management for Secure Communication

 

               Michael Calvo – Computing Clouds (Wednesday, April 6, 2011)



                    Presentation

                    Above the Clouds

 

               Frank Hines – Cheap User Modeling for Adaptive Systems (Friday, April 8, 2011)



                    Presentation

                For want of a bit the user was lost: Cheap user modeling

 

               Jason Bender – Web Page Classification (Monday, April 11, 2011)



                    Presentation

                    Web Page Classification: Features and Algorithms

 

                Anthony Luaders – Introduction to Quantum Computing (Wednesday, April 13, 2011)



                    Presentation

                    Introduction to Quantum Computing

 

               James Grisetti – Procedural Content Generation (Friday, April 15)



                   Presentation

                   Towards Procedural Level Generation for Rehabilitation

                   Procedural Modeling of Cities

                   Towards Procedural Strategy Game Generation: Evolving Complementary Unit Types

                   The Algorithmic Beauty of Plants
Class Schedule:

Number of sessions per week: 3 sessions per week Duration of each session: 50 minutes



Contribution of course to meeting the Professional Component:

Math & Science Topics: <3> Engineering Topics: <0> General Education Topics: <0>



        1. Assessment Data




Course Outcomes

#1

#1

#2

#3

#4


Outcome


#1


Outcome #2



Outcome #3



Outcome #4


Last Name

Faculty evaluative of

student presentations



Average student evaluation of student presentations



Evaluation

of written

skills in students reviews


Social impact of computer and information technology

Ethics

issues conputer & information technology

student1

95

94.67

94

100

100

95.13

94

100

100

student2

95

96.8

96

100

100

96.16

96

100

100

student3

90

92.36

84

100

100

89.67

84

100

100

student4

80

83.92

90

100

100

85.78

90

100

100

student5

85

90.3

80

95

100

85.81

80

95

100

sttudent6

90

88.82

40

0

90

70.26

40

0

90

student7

92

96.25

100

100

100

96.05

100

100

100

student8

88

89.59

100

100

100

93.11

100

100

100

student9

94

97.31

98

100

100

96.46

98

100

100

student10

90

87.84

75

90

95

85.31

75

90

95

student11

92

92.48

100

100

100

95.29

100

100

100

student12

95

95.52

40

100

100

79.10

40

100

100

student13

95

97.37

88

100

100

93.87

88

100

100

student14

98

97.38

100

100

100

98.67

100

100

100

student15

92

92.59

70

100

100

86.31

70

100

100

student16

92

94.69

92

100

100

93.38

92

100

100

student17

90

91.68

98

100

100

93.73

98

100

100

student18

80

84.52

96

98

90

87.10

96

98

90

student19

90

90.26

95

100

100

92.55

95

100

100

student20

95

94.97

98

95

100

96.14

98

95

100

student21

90

91.72

88

100

100

90.74

88

100

100

student22

90

91.96

90

100

100

91.39

90

100

100

student23

90

93.83

90

100

100

91.76

90

100

100

student24

92

94.23

100

100

100

95.64

100

100

100

student25

98

97.09

90

100

0

90.61

90

100

0

student26

88

90.76

90

100

95

90.10

90

100

95

student27

90

90.3

94

100

100

92.86

94

100

100

student28

95

97.43

98

100

100

96.88

98

100

100

student29

70

72.92

70

95

100

73.33

70

95

100

student30

94

96.52

95

100

100

95.40

95

100

100

student31

95

92.38

90

100

100

93.46

90

100

100

student32

95

95.68

94

100

100

95.33

94

100

100

student33

90

92.71

92

100

100

92.14

92

100

100

student34

90

92.57

84

95

95

89.20

84

95

95

atudent35

94

95.25

92

100

100

94.25

92

100

100

Max Points

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

Performance
Threshold %


80%


80%


80%


80%


80%


32/35=91.4%


30/35=85% 


34/35=97% 

34/35=97%

        1. Assessment Results Analysis


Quality Goal: 50% of all students who receive 70% or above shall meet or exceed the assessment threshold for each Course Assessment Outcome.

Outcome 1: Professional Oral Communication.

Outcome 2: To enhance professional & technical written communication skills.
Outcome 3: To understand the process of technological change in society and the impact of computer science is bringing about to the many areas of computing reading some of the papers.
Outcome 4: To understand some of the basic ethical and professional issues inherent in the discipline of computing. Course

Recommendation based on Assessment Results
A recommendation from the 2010 Spring semester ABET evaluation reads:” However, this course is quite intensive already with three major distinct aspects in it: 1) knowing about ethical theories and their application, 2) oral presentations, 3) and term paper.”

We addressed some of these issues during the Spring 2011 semester. The two textbooks are recommended readings rather than required texts. Instead of three short oral presentations there is a single extended (50 minutes) presentation for each student; this allows an in depth discussions of one or more papers, followed by questions and answers.

At the beginning of the class the instructor provided a list of topics and papers; this list included seminal papers, some written by Turing award winners, as well as, surveys of important areas of computer science. The students were asked to choose topics from this list or discuss with the instructor the possibility of presenting topics related to their research interests. This turned out to be a very good idea; the majority of the presentations were of a very high quality; they showed the enthusiasm of the students for their research and generated interesting discussions. The students are required to do a literature search and identify important resources for each topic they present. The majority of presentations cover multiple recent papers rather than being based on a 3-4 page section in the 1990 textbook. Ethics questions and the impact of computer science and technology are addressed throughout the semester, as well as in several dedicated presentations. All presentations, as well as, the links to additional readings for each presentation are posted on the class Web site, which became a resource for students to broaden their horizons.

The topics selected by the students covered a broad range of areas of computer science including: Algorithms (5); Computer architecture (3); Distributed systems (4); Programming languages and Systems (5); Computer security (3); Intelligent systems (3), The Web (2), and so on. This selection of topics allowed the students to follow the process of technological and theoretical changes and their impact for many areas of computer science. Virtually all presentations discussed the impact of technological changes and the role of computer science. Two student presentations and one of the final lectures were dedicated to ethical aspects of computer science; other students addressed this topic in their presentations whenever the topic permitted.

During the first week of the class, the instructor presented a talk on how to make good presentations; throughout the semester he discussed with the students the contents of their presentations and suggested additional readings for selected topics. At the last session the students were encouraged to suggest improvements to the class.

The class attendance was very high and the students showed interest in the topic presented, as indicated by the fair number of questions during and after each presentation. Many CS students are involved in undergraduate research and their interest in research was stimulated.



Submitted by: Dr. Dan C. Marinescu Date: May 2011

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