Appendix 2-5: Rejected ecotox bibliography for Chlorpyrifos



Download 6.25 Mb.
Page91/151
Date conversion04.02.2017
Size6.25 Mb.
1   ...   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   ...   151
Vmax/ Km/ Urinary metabolites/ Risk assessment

693. Knezevic, Zorka; Serdar, Maja, and Knezevic, Zorka. Screening of Fresh Fruit and Vegetables for Pesticide Residues on Croatian Market. 2009 Apr; 20, (4): 419-422.


Rec #: 44899
Keywords: SURVEY
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate pesticide residues in market foods in Croatia. A total of 240 samples of fresh fruit and vegetables from import and domestic production were analyzed. Pesticide resides were determined by gas chromatography with mass selective detector (GC-MSD). Sample extract was cleaned up using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). In 66.7% of the samples no residues were found, 25.8% of samples contained pesticide residues at or below MRL, and 7.5% of samples contained pesticide residues above MRL. Most frequently found pesticides were imazalil (found in 35 samples) and chlorpyrifos (found in 24 samples). The findings of this study pointed to the following recommendations: the need for a monitoring program for pesticide residues in food crops, especially imported food crops.
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Fruits
Keywords: Vegetables
Keywords: Pesticide residues
Keywords: Gas chromatography
Keywords: Food
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Crops
Date revised - 2008-12-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 419-422
ProQuest ID - 19692334
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Pesticide residues; Food; Pesticides; Vegetables; Fruits; Crops; Gas chromatography; Chlorpyrifos
Last updated - 2011-12-14
British nursing index edition - Food Control [Food Control]. Vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 419-422. Apr 2009.
Corporate institution author - Knezevic, Zorka; Serdar, Maja
DOI - MD-0008895023; 8683328; 0956-7135 English

694. Knodel, Janet. New formulation of Lorsban for 2009 . 2008 July 24, issue 11.


Rec #: 53309
Keywords: REVIEW
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Keywords: Internet resource
1022986443

695. Knudsen, Thomas B; Houck, Keith a; Sipes, Nisha S; Singh, Amar V; Judson, Richard S; Martin, Matthew T; Weissman, Arthur; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C; Mortensen, Holly M; Reif, David M; Rabinowitz, James R; Setzer, Rwoodrow; Richard, Ann M; Dix, David J; Kavlock, Robert J, and Reif, David M. Activity Profiles of 309 Toxcast(Tm) Chemicals Evaluated Across 292 Biochemical Targets. 2011 Mar 28; 282, (1-2): 1-15.


Rec #: 47379
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Understanding the potential health risks posed by environmental chemicals is a significant challenge elevated by the large number of diverse chemicals with generally uncharacterized exposures, mechanisms, and toxicities. The present study is a performance evaluation and critical analysis of assay results for an array of 292 high-throughput cell-free assays aimed at preliminary toxicity evaluation of 320 environmental chemicals in EPA's ToxCast(TM) project (Phase I). The chemicals (309 unique, 11 replicates) were mainly precursors or the active agent of commercial pesticides, for which a wealth of in vivo toxicity data is available. Biochemical HTS (high-throughput screening) profiled cell and tissue extracts using semi-automated biochemical and pharmacological methodologies to evaluate a subset of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), CYP450 enzymes (CYPs), kinases, phosphatases, proteases, HDACs, nuclear receptors, ion channels, and transporters. The primary screen tested all chemicals at a relatively high concentration 25 mu M concentration (or 10 mu M for CYP assays), and a secondary screen re-tested 9132 chemical-assay pairs in 8-point concentration series from 0.023 to 50 mu M (or 0.009-20 mu M for CYPs). Mapping relationships across 93,440 chemical-assay pairs based on half-maximal activity concentration (AC50) revealed both known and novel targets in signaling and metabolic pathways. The primary dataset, summary data and details on quality control checks are available for download at http://www.epa.gov/ncct/toxcast/.
Keywords: Risk assessment
Keywords: Chemicals
Keywords: Biochemistry
Keywords: Q5 01502:Methods and instruments
Keywords: Ion channels
Keywords: Metabolic pathways
Keywords: Proteinase
Keywords: high-throughput screening
Keywords: Mapping
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Phosphatase
Keywords: Toxicology
Keywords: Screening
Keywords: Histone deacetylase
Keywords: Pharmacy And Pharmacology
Keywords: Data processing
Keywords: double prime G protein-coupled receptors
Keywords: Nuclear receptors
Keywords: Receptors
Keywords: Enzymes
Keywords: Toxicity
Keywords: ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety
Keywords: EPA
Keywords: Quality control
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Water Resources Abstracts; ASFA 3: Aquatic Pollution & Environmental Quality; Environment Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Signal transduction
Date revised - 2011-10-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 1-15
ProQuest ID - 886614325
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Screening; Quality control; Pesticides; Receptors; Phosphatase; Toxicology; Histone deacetylase; Data processing; double prime G protein-coupled receptors; Nuclear receptors; Enzymes; Toxicity; Ion channels; Metabolic pathways; Proteinase; high-throughput screening; Mapping; Signal transduction; Risk assessment; Chemicals; EPA; Biochemistry
Last updated - 2011-12-13
Corporate institution author - Knudsen, Thomas B; Houck, Keith A; Sipes, Nisha S; Singh, Amar V; Judson, Richard S; Martin, Matthew T; Weissman, Arthur; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C; Mortensen, Holly M; Reif, David M; Rabinowitz, James R; Setzer, RWoodrow; Richard, Ann M; Dix, David J; Kavlock, Robert J
DOI - OB-bdba0d4a-2be7-4b03-9c09csamfg201; 14515435; CS1147059; 0300-483X English

696. Kobayash, Maki; Takano, Ichiro; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Tomizawa, Sanae; Tateishi, Yukinari; Sakai, Naoko; Kamijo, Kyoko; Ibe, Akihiro; Nagayama, Toshihiro, and Kobayash, Maki. Survey of Pesticide Residues in Imported Cereal Products (1994.4[Approx]2006.3). 2008; 49, (3): 249-260.


Rec #: 46249
Keywords: FOOD
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A survey of pesticide residues in 490 imported cereal products on the Tokyo market from April 1994 to March 2006 was carried out. Eight kinds of organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, DDVP, diazinon, etrimfos, malathion, MEP and pirimiphos-methyl) were detected at levels between Tr (below 0.01 ppm) and 0.82 ppm from 91 samples. In our investigations, chlorpyrifos-methyl and malathion tended to be detected in samples from America, pirimiphos-methyl in those from Europe, and MEP in those from Oceania. Thus, pesticide residues seemed to be different in produce from different areas. Residue levels of these pesticides were calculated as between 0.08 and 13.2% of their ADI values according to the daily intake of cereal products. Therefore, these cereal products should be safe for normal usage.
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Pesticide residues
Keywords: H 5000:Pesticides
Keywords: ANE, Europe
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Oceania
Keywords: Health & Safety Science Abstracts
Keywords: Diazinon
Keywords: Malathion
Keywords: INW, Japan, Honshu, Tokyo Prefect., Tokyo
Date revised - 2011-05-01
Language of summary - English
Location - ANE, Europe; Oceania; INW, Japan, Honshu, Tokyo Prefect., Tokyo
Pages - 249-260
ProQuest ID - 867746332
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Chlorpyrifos; Pesticide residues; Pesticides; Diazinon; Malathion; ANE, Europe; Oceania; INW, Japan, Honshu, Tokyo Prefect., Tokyo
Last updated - 2013-02-08
British nursing index edition - Food Hygiene and Safety Science/Shokuhin Eiseigaku Zasshi. Vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 249-260. 2008.
Corporate institution author - Kobayash, Maki; Takano, Ichiro; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Tomizawa, Sanae; Tateishi, Yukinari; Sakai, Naoko; Kamijo, Kyoko; Ibe, Akihiro; Nagayama, Toshihiro
DOI - c186a031-a75b-4295-af21csamfg201; 13907475; 1882-1006 English

697. Kobayashi, Maki; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Tomizawa, Sanae; Kamijo, Kyoko; Iwakoshi, Keiko; Kageyama, Yuriko; Nagayama, Toshihiro; Takano, Ichiro, and Kobayashi, Maki. Survey of Pesticide Residues in Imported Frozen Vegetables and Fruits (1989.4~2008.3). 2011; 52, (2): 121-129.


Rec #: 43629
Keywords: FOOD
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A survey of pesticide residues in 595 imported frozen products on the Tokyo market from April 1989 to March 2008 was carried out. Forty three kinds of pesticides, including organophosphorus, organochlorine, carbamate, pyrethroid and others, were detected between levels of trace (below 0.01 ppm) and 4.6 ppm from 162 samples. Chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin and omethoate were frequently detected in green vegetables (komatsuna leaf and spinach), cypermethrin and methamidophos were detected in pods and seeds (green soybean and string pea), chlorpropham (CIPC) was detected in potato, and captan and carbaryl were detected in berries (blueberry, raspberry and strawberry). The hydrophilic pesticide methamidophos was detected in flesh of lychee. Residue levels of these pesticides were calculated as between less than 0.5% and 30% of their ADI values according to the daily intake of frozen products. Therefore, these frozen products should be safe when they were eaten in customary amounts.
Keywords: Organochlorine compounds
Keywords: Pesticide residues
Keywords: fruits
Keywords: Carbaryl
Keywords: Health & Safety Science Abstracts
Keywords: Fragaria
Keywords: Vaccinium
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: cypermethrin
Keywords: H 5000:Pesticides
Keywords: Solanum tuberosum
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Japan, Honshu, Tokyo Prefect., Tokyo
Keywords: Spinacia oleracea
Keywords: soybeans
Keywords: Captan
Date revised - 2011-06-01
Language of summary - English
Location - Japan, Honshu, Tokyo Prefect., Tokyo
Pages - 121-129
ProQuest ID - 872137978
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Chlorpyrifos; cypermethrin; Organochlorine compounds; Pesticide residues; Pesticides; fruits; Carbaryl; soybeans; Captan; Solanum tuberosum; Vaccinium; Spinacia oleracea; Fragaria; Japan, Honshu, Tokyo Prefect., Tokyo
Last updated - 2012-03-29
British nursing index edition - Food Hygiene and Safety Science/Shokuhin Eiseigaku Zasshi. Vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 121-129. 2011.
Corporate institution author - Kobayashi, Maki; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Tomizawa, Sanae; Kamijo, Kyoko; Iwakoshi, Keiko; Kageyama, Yuriko; Nagayama, Toshihiro; Takano, Ichiro
DOI - eef9ef3f-97b5-4725-b606csaobj201; 14899482; 1882-1006 English

698. Koblizkova, M; Lee, S C; Harner, T, and Koblizkova, M. Sorbent Impregnated Polyurethane Foam Disk Passive Air Samplers for Investigating Current-Use Pesticides at the Global Scale. 2012 Oct; 3, (4): 456-462.


Rec #: 42499
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A pilot study conducted at a subset of 20 sites operated under the GAPS (Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling) Network compared the performance of two types of passive samplers for measuring air concentrations of currently-used pesticides, during 3-month deployment periods. The conventional polyurethane foam (PUF) disk sampler was able to capture a range of targeted current-use pesticides CUPs (dacthal, trifluralin, chlorothalonil, chlorpyrifos, and pendimethalin) but experienced equilibrium for some compounds (dacthal, trifluralin, and chlorothalonil) during the deployment period. The second sampler type used was a modified PUF disk sampler impregnated with XAD powder [i.e. the SIP (sorbent-impregnated PUF) disk] to increase sorptive capacity. The SIP disk sampler accumulated greater amounts of most targeted CUPs when compared to the PUF disk sampler. Results of the study showed that chlorothalonil was the most abundant CUP reflecting its widespread use, globally; whereas dacthal exhibited greater global distribution, including presence at remote sites, reflecting its high potential for long-range atmospheric transport. A thorough calibration of both the PUF disk and the SIP disk samplers is required to further define uptake profiles and to determine their range of applicability for various CUPs.
Keywords: P 0000:AIR POLLUTION
Keywords: Meteorological & Geoastrophysical Abstracts; Pollution Abstracts
Keywords: Pendimethalin
Keywords: Air pollution
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Sorbents
Keywords: Atmospheric transport
Keywords: M2 551.510.42:Air Pollution (551.510.42)
Keywords: Foam
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Air sampling
Keywords: Trifluralin
Keywords: Atmospheric pollution research
Date revised - 2012-11-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 456-462
ProQuest ID - 1221146686
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Atmospheric transport; Foam; Atmospheric pollution research; Chlorpyrifos; Air pollution; Sorbents; Pesticides; Air sampling; Trifluralin; Pendimethalin
Last updated - 2013-01-11
British nursing index edition - Atmospheric Pollution Research. Vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 456-462. Oct 2012.
Corporate institution author - Koblizkova, M; Lee, S C; Harner, T
DOI - MD-0020083596; 17394721; 1309-1042 English

699. Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sata, Fumihiro; Takeuchi, Shinji; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Nagai, Tadanori, and Kojima, Hiroyuki. Comparative Study of Human and Mouse Pregnane X Receptor Agonistic Activity in 200 Pesticides Using in Vitro Reporter Gene Assays. 2011 Feb 27; 280, (3 ): 77-87.


Rec #: 47409
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The nuclear receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that regulates genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PXR activation may affect energy metabolism as well as the endocrine and immune systems. In this study, we characterized and compared the agonistic activities of a variety of pesticides against human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR). We tested the hPXR and mPXR agonistic activity of 200 pesticides (29 organochlorines, 11 diphenyl ethers, 56 organophosphorus pesticides, 12 pyrethroids, 22 carbamates, 12 acid amides, 7 triazines, 7 ureas, and 44 others) by reporter gene assays using COS-7 simian kidney cells. Of the 200 pesticides tested, 106 and 93 activated hPXR and mPXR, respectively, and a total of 111 had hPXR and/or mPXR agonistic activity with greater or lesser inter-species differences. Although all of the pyrethroids and most of the organochlorines and acid amides acted as PXR agonists, a wide range of pesticides with diverse structures also showed hPXR and/or mPXR agonistic activity. Among the 200 pesticides, pyributicarb, pretilachlor, piperophos and butamifos for hPXR, and phosalone, prochloraz, pendimethalin, and butamifos for mPXR, acted as particularly potent activators at low concentrations in the order of 10a degree 8-10a degree 7M. In addition, we found that several organophosphorus oxon- and pyributicarb oxon-metabolites decreased PXR activation potency compared to their parent compounds. These results suggest that a large number of structurally diverse pesticides and their metabolites possess PXR-mediated transcriptional activity, and their ability to do so varies in a species-dependent manner in humans and mice.
Keywords: ENA 03:Energy
Keywords: Organochlorine compounds
Keywords: phosalone
Keywords: immune system
Keywords: Immune system
Keywords: diphenyl ether
Keywords: Urea
Keywords: Metabolites
Keywords: Pendimethalin
Keywords: triazine
Keywords: G 07720:Immunogenetics
Keywords: Prochloraz
Keywords: Amides
Keywords: Ethers
Keywords: Pyrethroids
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: pendimethalin
Keywords: Pesticides (organophosphorus)
Keywords: Pharmacy And Pharmacology
Keywords: Energy metabolism
Keywords: Nuclear receptors
Keywords: Genetics Abstracts; Environment Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Pesticides (carbamates)
Keywords: Reporter gene
Keywords: Transcription factors
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Kidney
Keywords: pregnane X receptors
Keywords: amides
Keywords: Metabolism
Date revised - 2011-10-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 77-87
ProQuest ID - 854227768
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Pesticides (organophosphorus); Organochlorine compounds; phosalone; Energy metabolism; Immune system; Nuclear receptors; diphenyl ether; Urea; Metabolites; Pesticides (carbamates); Pendimethalin; triazine; Prochloraz; Reporter gene; Transcription factors; Kidney; pregnane X receptors; Pyrethroids; amides; Amides; immune system; Pesticides; Ethers; pendimethalin; Metabolism
Last updated - 2011-12-12
Corporate institution author - Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sata, Fumihiro; Takeuchi, Shinji; Sueyoshi, Tatsuya; Nagai, Tadanori
DOI - OB-2dd1852d-c999-4159-9b92csamfg201; 14344236; 0300-483X English

700. Komuro, A.; Bamming, D., and Horvath, C. M. Negative Regulation of Cytoplasmic Rna-Mediated Antiviral Signaling.


Rec #: 51119
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell Biol. 1999 Apr;19(4):2465-74 (medline /10082512)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 1999 Mar;73(3):2425-33 (medline /9971827)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Interferon Cytokine Res. 1998 Sep;18(9):757-66 (medline /9781815)
COMMENTS: Cites: Genes Dev. 1998 Jul 1;12(13):2061-72 (medline /9649509)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 1995 Jan;69(1):499-505 (medline /7527085)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 1995 Sep;69(9):5754-62 (medline /7637020)
COMMENTS: Cites: Virology. 1994 Nov 1;204(2):823-7 (medline /7524241)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 1994 Jun;68(6):3821-9 (medline /7514679)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 1990 Sep 5;265(25):14705-8 (medline /2118515)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Pathol. 1981 Mar;102(3):396-402 (medline /6163363)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 1975 Nov 6;258(5530):76-8 (medline /1186883)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2003 May 16;300(5622):1145-8 (medline /12702807)
COMMENTS: Cites: Virology. 2004 Oct 25;328(2):177-84 (medline /15464838)
COMMENTS: Cites: FEBS Lett. 2004 Oct 8;576(1-2):86-90 (medline /15474016)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Immunol. 2004 Oct;5(10):1052-60 (medline /15334086)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2004 Aug 27;279(35):36570-8 (medline /15215253)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2004 Aug 5;430(7000):694-9 (medline /15258597)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2004 Aug;78(16):8411-20 (medline /15280450)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Immunol. 2004 Jul;5(7):730-7 (medline /15208624)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Exp Med. 2004 Jun 21;199(12):1641-50 (medline /15210742)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2004 Mar 18;428(6980):341-5 (medline /15029200)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2004 Mar 12;279(11):9698-702 (medline /14703513)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2004 Mar 12;279(11):10136-41 (medline /14699140)
COMMENTS: Cites: Oncogene. 2004 Mar 4;23(9):1789-800 (medline /14676839)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2004 Feb;78(4):1865-72 (medline /14747551)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Jan 6;101(1):233-8 (medline /14679297)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell. 2003 Dec;12(6):1413-26 (medline /14690596)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2004 Jan;78(1):197-205 (medline /14671101)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2003 Dec;77(24):13257-66 (medline /14645582)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2003 Aug;77(16):8661-8 (medline /12885884)
COMMENTS: Cites: Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2003 Jul 11;306(4):860-6 (medline /12821121)
COMMENTS: Cites: Virology. 2003 May 10;309(2):181-9 (medline /12758165)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2003 May 16;300(5622):1148-51 (medline /12702806)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Immunol. 2003 May;4(5):491-6 (medline /12692549)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2002 Oct 24;419(6909):853-7 (medline /12397362)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2002 Oct 24;419(6909):849-53 (medline /12397361)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2002 Jul 12;277(28):25576-82 (medline /11986318)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2002 May;76(10):5251-9 (medline /11967338)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Med. 2001 Jun;7(6):719-24 (medline /11385510)
COMMENTS: Cites: Oncogene. 2001 Feb 15;20(7):800-11 (medline /11314014)
COMMENTS: Cites: EMBO J. 2001 Mar 1;20(5):979-89 (medline /11230122)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2001 Mar 23;276(12):8951-7 (medline /11124948)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2000 Dec;74(24):11566-73 (medline /11090154)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2000 Dec;74(23):11215-21 (medline /11070019)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2000 Sep 29;289(5488):2350-4 (medline /11009421)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2000 Sep;74(17):7989-96 (medline /10933707)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2000 Apr;74(8):3781-92 (medline /10729153)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2007 Apr;81(7):3455-64 (medline /17229694)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2007 Apr;81(7):3077-86 (medline /17215277)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2007 Mar 9;315(5817):1398-401 (medline /17272685)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2007 Mar;36(3):263-9 (medline /17053203)
COMMENTS: Cites: Virology. 2007 Mar 1;359(1):190-200 (medline /17049367)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Gen Virol. 2007 Feb;88(Pt 2):613-20 (medline /17251580)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Jan 9;104(2):582-7 (medline /17190814)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2007 Jan;81(2):964-76 (medline /17093192)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2007 Jan;81(2):514-24 (medline /17079289)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2006 Dec;80(24):12332-42 (medline /17020950)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2006 Dec;80(23):11667-77 (medline /16987984)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2006 Dec;80(23):11723-32 (medline /16971436)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2006 Nov 10;314(5801):994-7 (medline /17038590)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2006 Nov 10;314(5801):997-1001 (medline /17038589)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2006 Oct;80(20):10181-90 (medline /17005695)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2006 Oct;80(20):10173-80 (medline /17005694)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2006 Oct;80(19):9676-86 (medline /16973572)
COMMENTS: Cites: Virol J. 2006;3:66 (medline /16945160)
COMMENTS: Cites: Immunity. 2006 Sep;25(3):349-60 (medline /16979567)
COMMENTS: Cites: EMBO J. 2006 Jul 26;25(14):3257-63 (medline /16858409)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 May 30;103(22):8459-64 (medline /16714379)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Immunol. 2006 Jun;7(6):598-605 (medline /16699525)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2006 Jun;80(11):5168-78 (medline /16698997)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2006 May 4;441(7089):101-5 (medline /16625202)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 May 2;103(18):7100-5 (medline /16627618)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2006 Mar;80(6):2913-23 (medline /16501100)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2006 Jan 27;281(4):2095-103 (medline /16306043)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2006 Jan 12;439(7073):204-7 (medline /16306937)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2006 Jan 12;439(7073):208-11 (medline /16306936)
COMMENTS: Cites: Virology. 2006 Jan 5;344(1):119-30 (medline /16364743)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Immunol. 2005 Oct 15;175(8):5260-8 (medline /16210631)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Dec 6;102(49):17717-22 (medline /16301520)
COMMENTS: Cites: EMBO J. 2005 Dec 7;24(23):4018-28 (medline /16281057)
COMMENTS: Cites: Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2005 Dec 30;338(4):1682-9 (medline /16289032)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2005 Oct 20;437(7062):1167-72 (medline /16177806)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Gen Virol. 2005 Oct;86(Pt 10):2697-702 (medline /16186222)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Immunol. 2005 Oct;6(10):981-8 (medline /16127453)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Sep 20;102(38):13640-5 (medline /16155125)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell. 2005 Sep 16;19(6):727-40 (medline /16153868)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cell. 2005 Sep 9;122(5):669-82 (medline /16125763)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Immunol. 2005 Sep 1;175(5):2851-8 (medline /16116171)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2005 Sep;79(17):10968-77 (medline /16103148)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Jul 19;102(29):10200-5 (medline /16009940)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2005 Jul;79(14):8707-15 (medline /15994764)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2005 Jun;79(12):7673-81 (medline /15919920)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2005 Jun;79(12):7311-8 (medline /15919885)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2005 Jun;79(11):7239-47 (medline /15890962)
COMMENTS: Cites: PLoS Biol. 2005 May;3(5):e156 (medline /15884975)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2005 May 6;280(18):18321-5 (medline /15753087)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2005 May;79(9):5353-62 (medline /15827150)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2005 Apr;79(7):3969-78 (medline /15767399)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2004 Nov 5;306(5698):1037-40 (medline /15528445)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Feb 22;102(8):2992-7 (medline /15710891)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Mar 1;102(9):3441-6 (medline /15728364)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2005 Feb 4;307(5710):727-31 (medline /15576571)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Immunol. 2005 Feb 1;174(3):1507-12 (medline /15661910)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cell. 2004 Dec 17;119(6):753-66 (medline /15607973)
COMMENTS: Cites: Virology. 2005 Jan 5;331(1):63-72 (medline /15582653)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Dec 7;101(49):17264-9 (medline /15563593)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2004 Dec;78(23):12877-87 (medline /15542640)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2004 Nov 5;306(5698):990-5 (medline /15528435)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell. 1998 Jun;1(7):991-1000 (medline /9651582)
COMMENTS: Cites: EMBO J. 1999 Apr 15;18(8):2273-83 (medline /10205180)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell Biol. 1998 May;18(5):2986-96 (medline /9566918)
COMMENTS: Cites: PLoS Pathog. 2008 May;4(5):e1000077 (medline /18516301)
COMMENTS: Cites: PLoS One. 2008;3(4):e2032 (medline /18446221)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Immunol. 2008 May;45(10):2839-46 (medline /18336912)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2008 Apr;82(7):3500-8 (medline /18216110)
COMMENTS: Cites: EMBO Rep. 2008 Mar;9(3):293-300 (medline /18219313)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell. 2008 Feb 29;29(4):428-40 (medline /18242112)
COMMENTS: Cites: Curr Opin Immunol. 2008 Feb;20(1):23-9 (medline /18262399)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2008 Jan 31;451(7178):573-7 (medline /18200010)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell. 2008 Feb 1;29(2):169-79 (medline /18243112)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2008 Feb;82(3):1474-83 (medline /18057259)
COMMENTS: Cites: Biochem Pharmacol. 2008 Feb 1;75(3):589-602 (medline /17868652)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Gen Virol. 2008 Jan;89(Pt 1):1-47 (medline /18089727)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2008 Jan;82(1):335-45 (medline /17942531)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2007 Dec 7;318(5856):1628-32 (medline /17991829)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cell Microbiol. 2007 Dec;9(12):2921-30 (medline /17991048)
COMMENTS: Cites: Immunol Rev. 2007 Dec;220:214-24 (medline /17979849)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2007 Nov;81(22):12227-37 (medline /17804509)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 28;104(35):14050-5 (medline /17709747)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Jul 10;104(28):11706-11 (medline /17600090)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2007 May 25;282(21):15315-8 (medline /17395582)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 May 1;104(18):7500-5 (medline /17460044)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Immunol. 2007 May 15;178(10):6444-55 (medline /17475874)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Med. 2007 May;13(5):543-51 (medline /17479100)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2007 Jun;81(11):5737-48 (medline /17376932)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Apr 24;104(17):7253-8 (medline /17438296)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cell Mol Life Sci. 2007 May;64(9):1038-42 (medline /17372677)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 2007 Apr 19;446(7138):916-920 (medline /17392790)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cell Microbiol. 2007 Apr;9(4):930-8 (medline /17140406)
ABSTRACT: The recent, rapid progress in our understanding of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral innate immune signaling was initiated by the discovery of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) as a sensor of viral RNA. It is now widely recognized that RIG-I and related RNA helicases, melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5 (MDA5) and laboratory of genetics and physiology-2 (LGP2), can initiate and/or regulate RNA and virus-mediated type I IFN production and antiviral responses. As with other cytokine systems, production of type I IFN is a transient process, and can be hazardous to the host if unregulated, resulting in chronic cellular toxicity or inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In addition, the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) system is a fundamental target for virus-encoded immune suppression, with many indirect and direct examples of interference described. In this article, we review the current understanding of endogenous negative regulation in RLR signaling and explore direct inhibition of RLR signaling by viruses as a host immune evasion strategy.
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: Cytokines/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: DEAD-box RNA Helicases/*physiology
MESH HEADINGS: DNA-Binding Proteins
MESH HEADINGS: Endopeptidases/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Immunity, Innate/*physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Interferon Type I/*biosynthesis
MESH HEADINGS: Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Microtubule-Associated Proteins
MESH HEADINGS: Mitochondrial Proteins/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Nuclear Proteins/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Nuclear Receptor Co-Repressor 1
MESH HEADINGS: Peptidylprolyl Isomerase/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor)/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: RNA Helicases/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: RNA, Viral/*analysis
MESH HEADINGS: Repressor Proteins/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Signal Transduction/*drug effects/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier Proteins/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Tumor Suppressor Proteins/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Ubiquitins/physiology eng

701. Kong, Z; Shan, W; Dong, F; Liu, X; Xu, J; Li, M; Zheng, Y, and Kong, Z. Effect of Home Processing on the Distribution and Reduction of Pesticide Residues in Apples. 2012 Aug 1; 29, (8): 1280-1287.


Rec #: 42639
Keywords: FOOD
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The effect of home processing (washing, peeling, coring and juicing) on residue levels of chlorpyrifos, beta -cypermethrin, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim in apple segments was investigated. The pesticide residues were determined by UPLC-MS/MS and GC with a flame photometric (FPD) and electron capture detection (ECD). The results indicated that the pesticide residue levels in the apple peel and core were higher compared with in the apple flesh. After peeled and cored apple was processed into apple juice and pomace, chlorpyrifos, beta -cypermethrin and tebuconazole were concentrated in the apple pomace. However, residues of acetamiprid and carbendazim were exceptions. The apple pomace was free of acetamiprid, which was mainly present in the apple juice. After washing the mean loss of chlorpyrifos, beta -cypermethrin, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim from apples under recommended dosage and twofold higher dosage were 17-21%, 6.7-7.1%, 13-32%, 42-67% and 47-50%, respectively. The pesticide residues were significantly reduced in the edible part of the apple except for beta -cypermethrin during peeling and coring process. The removal effect of apple juicing was found to be the most pronounced on beta -cypermethrin residue, which was reduced in the range of 81-84%, and the reductions of chlorpyrifos, tebuconazole, acetamiprid and carbendazim upon apple juicing were in the range of 15-36%.
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Risk assessment
Keywords: Risk Abstracts
Keywords: Food additives
Keywords: Pesticide residues
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Malus
Keywords: R2 23060:Medical and environmental health
Date revised - 2013-01-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 1280-1287
ProQuest ID - 1268653711
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Risk assessment; Chlorpyrifos; Food additives; Pesticide residues; Pesticides; Malus
Last updated - 2013-02-08
British nursing index edition - Food Additives & Contaminants: Part A - Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment. Vol. 29, no. 8, pp. 1280-1287. 1 Aug 2012.
Corporate institution author - Kong, Z; Shan, W; Dong, F; Liu, X; Zheng, Y
DOI - 06c7350b-c7f9-491d-9e8amfgefd109; 17485818; 1944-0049; 1944-0057 English

702. Koolen, D. A.; Sharp, A. J.; Hurst, J. A.; Firth, H. V.; Knight, S. J.; Goldenberg, A.; Saugier-Veber, P.; Pfundt, R.; Vissers, L. E.; Destr‚E, A.; Grisart, B.; Rooms, L.; Van Der Aa, N.; Field, M.; Hackett, A.; Bell, K.; Nowaczyk, M. J.; Mancini, G. M.; Poddighe, P. J.; Schwartz, C. E.; Rossi, E.; De Gregori, M.; Antonacci-Fulton, L. L.; Mclellan, M. D. 2nd; Garrett, J. M.; Wiechert, M. A.; Miner, T. L.; Crosby, S.; Ciccone, R.; Willatt, L.; Rauch, A.; Zenker, M.; Aradhya, S.; Manning, M. A.; Strom, T. M.; Wagenstaller, J.; Krepischi-Santos, A. C.; Vianna-Morgante, A. M.; Rosenberg, C.; Price, S. M.; Stewart, H.; Shaw-Smith, C.; Brunner, H. G.; Wilkie, A. O.; Veltman, J. A.; Zuffardi, O.; Eichler, E. E., and De Vries, B. B. Clinical and Molecular Delineation of the 17q21.31 Microdeletion Syndrome.


Rec #: 51569
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Med Genet A. 2007 Jul 1;143A(13):1431-41 (medline /17568414)
COMMENTS: Cites: Eur J Med Genet. 2007 Jul-Aug;50(4):256-63 (medline /17576104)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Med Genet. 2007 Oct;44(10):629-36 (medline /17601928)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet. 2007 Aug 15;145C(3):280-90 (medline /17639596)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Oct;81(4):768-79 (medline /17847001)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Genet. 2008 Mar;40(3):322-8 (medline /18278044)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Genet. 1997 Jan;15(1):70-3 (medline /8988171)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1997 Sep;61(3):660-7 (medline /9326332)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nature. 1998 Jun 18;393(6686):702-5 (medline /9641683)
COMMENTS: Cites: Trends Genet. 1998 Oct;14(10):417-22 (medline /9820031)
COMMENTS: Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 1997 Feb;39(2):125-32 (medline /9062428)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1997 Jul 15;25(14):2745-51 (medline /9207020)
COMMENTS: Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 1999 Apr;8(4):711-5 (medline /10072441)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 May 11;96(10):5598-603 (medline /10318930)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 1999 Dec;58(12):1207-26 (medline /10604746)
COMMENTS: Cites: Ann Neurol. 2000 Dec;48(6):859-67 (medline /11117542)
COMMENTS: Cites: Trends Genet. 2002 Feb;18(2):74-82 (medline /11818139)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2002 Jun 15;30(12):e57 (medline /12060695)
COMMENTS: Cites: Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev. 2002;8(3):117-34 (medline /12216056)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Genet. 2003 Apr;33(4):466-8 (medline /12652298)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Med Genet. 2004 Apr;41(4):241-8 (medline /15060094)
COMMENTS: Cites: Hum Mutat. 2004 Jul;24(1):86-92 (medline /15221792)
COMMENTS: Cites: Hum Genomics. 2004 May;1(4):287-99 (medline /15588488)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Genet. 2005 Feb;37(2):129-37 (medline /15654335)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Med Genet. 2005 Nov;42(11):837-46 (medline /15792962)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2005 Jul;77(1):78-88 (medline /15918152)
COMMENTS: Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2005 Aug 15;14(16):2399-404 (medline /16000317)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cancer Res. 2005 Jul 15;65(14):6071-9 (medline /16024607)
COMMENTS: Cites: Genet Med. 2005 Jul-Aug;7(6):422-32 (medline /16024975)
COMMENTS: Cites: Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2005 Nov;44(3):305-19 (medline /16075461)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2005 Nov;77(5):709-26 (medline /16252233)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Rev Genet. 2006 Feb;7(2):85-97 (medline /16418744)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cytogenet Genome Res. 2006;114(1):89-92 (medline /16717456)
COMMENTS: Cites: Eur J Hum Genet. 2006 Sep;14(9):1009-17 (medline /16773131)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Genet. 2006 Sep;38(9):1038-42 (medline /16906162)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Genet. 2006 Sep;38(9):1032-7 (medline /16906163)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Genet. 2006 Sep;38(9):999-1001 (medline /16906164)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Genet. 2006 Sep;38(9):974-6 (medline /16941003)
COMMENTS: Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2007 Feb;92(2):128-32 (medline /16990350)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Med Genet A. 2006 Dec 15;140(24):2730-41 (medline /17103451)
COMMENTS: Cites: Genome Res. 2007 May;17(5):659-66 (medline /17416743)
COMMENTS: Erratum in: J Med Genet. 2009 Aug;46(8):576
ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The chromosome 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is a novel genomic disorder that has originally been identified using high resolution genome analyses in patients with unexplained mental retardation.
ABSTRACT: AIM: We report the molecular and/or clinical characterisation of 22 individuals with the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome.
ABSTRACT: RESULTS: We estimate the prevalence of the syndrome to be 1 in 16,000 and show that it is highly underdiagnosed. Extensive clinical examination reveals that developmental delay, hypotonia, facial dysmorphisms including a long face, a tubular or pear-shaped nose and a bulbous nasal tip, and a friendly/amiable behaviour are the most characteristic features. Other clinically important features include epilepsy, heart defects and kidney/urologic anomalies. Using high resolution oligonucleotide arrays we narrow the 17q21.31 critical region to a 424 kb genomic segment (chr17: 41046729-41470954, hg17) encompassing at least six genes, among which is the gene encoding microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT). Mutation screening of MAPT in 122 individuals with a phenotype suggestive of 17q21.31 deletion carriers, but who do not carry the recurrent deletion, failed to identify any disease associated variants. In five deletion carriers we identify a < 500 bp rearrangement hotspot at the proximal breakpoint contained within an L2 LINE motif and show that in every case examined the parent originating the deletion carries a common 900 kb 17q21.31 inversion polymorphism, indicating that this inversion is a necessary factor for deletion to occur (p < 10(-5)).
ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: Our data establish the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome as a clinically and molecularly well recognisable genomic disorder.
MESH HEADINGS: *Abnormalities, Multiple/epidemiology/genetics/physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Adolescent
MESH HEADINGS: Adult
MESH HEADINGS: Child
MESH HEADINGS: Child, Preschool
MESH HEADINGS: *Chromosome Deletion
MESH HEADINGS: Chromosome Inversion
MESH HEADINGS: Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17/*genetics
MESH HEADINGS: *Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology/genetics/physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Face/pathology
MESH HEADINGS: Female
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Infant
MESH HEADINGS: Male
MESH HEADINGS: Muscle Hypotonia/epidemiology/genetics/physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
MESH HEADINGS: Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
MESH HEADINGS: Prevalence
MESH HEADINGS: Young Adult
MESH HEADINGS: tau Proteins eng

703. Kopecka-Pilarczyk, Justyna and Kopecka-Pilarczyk, Justyna. In Vitro Effects of Pesticides and Metals on the Activity of Acetylcholinesterase (Ache) From Different Tissues of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus Trossulus L. 2010 Jan; 45, (1): 46-52.


Rec #: 44359
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive comparison of the effect on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from various tissues of Mytilus trossulus caused by in vitro exposure to several pesticides and metals, because results available in the literature are inconsistent, difficult to compare, and sometimes contradict each other. For this purpose, fraction S10 extracted from gills, digestive gland, mantle and muscles, and the whole soft tissue of the mussel was exposed to several pesticides (dichlorvos, chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, carbofuran and carbaryl) and metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg, Pb) at a wide range of concentrations. AChE was inhibited in 50% or more in all the tissues exposed to dichlorvos, Cu, Hg and the mixture of Cu+Cd, and in some tissues exposed to carbaryl and carbofuran. The IC50 was calculated where possible. No inhibition was found in the case of chlorpyrifos, Cd, Pb, and Zn.
Keywords: Mytilus
Keywords: Acetylcholinesterase
Keywords: Carbaryl
Keywords: Mytilus edulis
Keywords: Copper
Keywords: P 6000:TOXICOLOGY AND HEALTH
Keywords: Toxicity tests
Keywords: Environmental factors
Keywords: Lead
Keywords: Agricultural Chemicals
Keywords: Glands
Keywords: Zinc
Keywords: Cadmium
Keywords: Mytilus trossulus
Keywords: Gills
Keywords: Dichlorvos
Keywords: Mantle
Keywords: Marine
Keywords: Metals
Keywords: SW 3050:Ultimate disposal of wastes
Keywords: Carbofuran
Keywords: ASFA 1: Biological Sciences & Living Resources; Toxicology Abstracts; Environment Abstracts; ASFA 3: Aquatic Pollution & Environmental Quality; Water Resources Abstracts; Pollution Abstracts
Keywords: Mussels
Keywords: Agricultural wastes
Keywords: dichlorvos
Keywords: Muscles
Keywords: Wastes
Keywords: X 24320:Food Additives & Contaminants
Keywords: carbofuran
Keywords: Q5 01504:Effects on organisms
Keywords: Fenitrothion
Keywords: Q1 01485:Species interactions: pests and control
Keywords: Food contamination
Keywords: ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Bioaccumulation
Keywords: Digestive glands
Keywords: Water Pollution Effects
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Marine molluscs
Keywords: Soft tissues
Date revised - 2010-11-01
Language of summary - English
Number of references - 27
Pages - 46-52
ProQuest ID - 762272674
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Digestive glands; Pesticides; Wastes; Marine molluscs; Environmental factors; Toxicity tests; Gills; Mantle; Metals; Carbofuran; Acetylcholinesterase; Agricultural wastes; Muscles; Carbaryl; Fenitrothion; Copper; Food contamination; Lead; Chlorpyrifos; Glands; Zinc; Cadmium; Soft tissues; Dichlorvos; dichlorvos; carbofuran; Bioaccumulation; Agricultural Chemicals; Mytilus; Mussels; Water Pollution Effects; Mytilus edulis; Mytilus trossulus; Marine
Last updated - 2012-12-14
British nursing index edition - Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B: Pesticides, Food Contaminants and Agricultural Wastes [J. Environ. Sci. Health, Pt. B: Pestic., Food Contam., Agric. Wastes]. Vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 46-52. Jan 2010.
Corporate institution author - Kopecka-Pilarczyk, Justyna
DOI - 849cc773-99cd-4aef-b31cmfgefd108; 13810500; CS1106438; 0360-1234; 1532-4109
Beauvais, S. L. , Jones, S. B. , Parris, J. T. , Brewer, S. K. andLittle, E. E. (2001) Cholinergic and Behavioral Neurotoxicity of Carbaryl and Cadmium to Larval Rainbow Trout (). Ecotoxicol. Environ. Saf., 49, pp. 84-90.
Binelli, A. , Ricciardi, F. , Riva, C. andProvini, A. (2006) New evidences for old biomarkers: Effects of several xenobiotics on EROD and AChE activities in Zebra mussel (). Chemosphere, 62, pp. 510-519.
Bocquene, G. , Bellanger, C. , Cadiou, Y. andGalgani, F. (1995) Joint action of combinations of pollutants on the acetylcholinesterase activity of several marine species. Ecotoxicology, 4, pp. 266-279.
Bocquene, G. andGalgani, F. (1998) Biological effects of contaminants: Cholinesterase inhibition by organophosphate and carbamate compounds, pp. 1-13. International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen, Denmark
Bocquene, G. , Galgani, F. andTruquet, P. (1990) Characterization and assay conditions for use of AChE activity from several marine species in pollution monitoring. Mar. Environ. Res., 30, pp. 75-89.
Bradford, M. (1976) A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein-dye binding. Anal. Biochem., 772, pp. 248-264.
Caussy, D. , Gochfeld, M. , Gurzau, E. , Neagu, C. andRuedel, H. (2003) Lessons from case studies of metals: investigating exposure, bioavailability and risk. Ecotoxicol. Environ. Saf., 56, pp. 45-51.
Ellman, G. L. , Courtney, K. O. , Andres, V. andFeatherstone, R. M. (1961) A new and rapid colorimetric determination of acetylcholinesterase activity. Biochem. Pharm., 7, pp. 88-95.
Escartin, E. andPorte, C. (1997) The use of cholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities from in pollution monitoring. Environ. Toxicol. Chem., 16:10, pp. 2090-2095.
Galgani, F. andBocquene, G. (1990) Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase from Four Marine Species by Organophosphates and Carbamates. Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol., 45, pp. 243-249.
Galgani, F. andBocquene, G. (2000) Molecular Biomarkers of Exposure of Marine Organisms to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Carbamates. Use of Biomarkers for Environmental Quality Assessment, pp. 113-134. Science Publisher Inc., Enfield, USA
Galloway, T. S. , Millward, N. , Browne, M. A. andDepledge, M. H. (2002) Rapid assessment of organophosphorus/carbamate exposure in the bivalve mollusc using combined esterase activities as biomarkers. Aquat. Toxicol., 61, pp. 169-180.
Guilhermino, L. , Lopes, M. C. , Carvalho, A. P. andSoares, A. M. V. M. (1996) Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity as effect criterion in acute tests with juvenile. Chemosphere, 32:4, pp. 727-738.
Guilhermino, L. , Barros, B. , Silva, M. C. andSoares, A. M. V. M. (1998) Should the use of inhibition of cholinesterases as a specific biomarker for organophosphate and carbamate pesticides be questioned?. Biomarkers, 3, pp. 157-163.
Kopecka, J. , Rybakovas, A. , Barsiene, J. andPempkowiak, J. (2004) AChE Levels in mussels and fish collected off Lithuania and Poland (southern Baltic). Oceanologia, 46:3, pp. 405-418.
Labrot, F. , Ribera, D. , Saint Denis, M. andNarbonne, J. F. (1996) and studies of potential biomarkers of lead and uranium contamination: lipid peroxidation, acetylcholinesterase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in three non-mammalian species. Biomarkers, 1, pp. 21-28.
Langston, W. , Bebianno, M. andBurt, G. (1998) Metal handling strategies in molluscs. Metal Metabolism in Aquatic Environments, pp. 219-284. Chapman and Hall, London
Le Bris, H. , Maffart, P. , Bocquene, G. , Buchet, V. , Galgani, F. andBlanc, G. (1995) Laboratory study on the effect of dichlorvos on two commercial bivalves. Aquaculture, 138, pp. 139-144.
Manahan, S. E. (2003) Organophosphorus Compounds. Toxicological Chemistry and Biochemistry; , Lewis Publishers, CRC Press Company, Boca Raton, Florida, USA
McHenery, J. G. , Linley-Adams, G. E. , Moore, D. C. , Rodger, G. K. andDavies, I. M. (1997) Experimental and field studies of effects of dichlorvos exposure on acetylcholinesterase activity in the gills of the mussel, L. Aquat. Toxicol., 38, pp. 125-143.
Mora, P. , Michel, X. andNarbonne, J. F. (1999) Cholinoesterases activity as potential biomarker in two bivalves. Environ. Toxicol. Pharmacol., 7, pp. 253-260.
Najimi, S. , Bouhaimi, A. , Daubeze, M. , Zekhnini, A. , Pellerin, J. , Narbonne, J. F. andMoukrim, A. (1997) Use of Acetylcholinesterase in and as a Biomarker of Pollution in Agadir Marine Bay (South of Morocco). Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol., 58, pp. 901-908.
Olson, D. L. andChristensen, G. M. (1980) Effects of Water Pollutants and Other Chemicals on Fish Acetylcholinesterase (). Environ. Res., 12, pp. 327-335.
Payne, J. F. , Mathieu, A. , Melvin, W. andFancey, L. L. (1996) Acetylcholinesterase, an old biomarker with a new future? Field trials in association with two urban rivers and a paper mill in Newfoundland. Mar. Pollut. Bull., 32:2, pp. 225-231.
Porte, C. , Escartin, E. andBorghi, V. (2001) Biochemical tools for the assessment of pesticide exposure in a deltaic environment: the use of cholinesterases and carboxylesterases. Biomarkers in Marine Organisms. A Practical Approach, pp. 259-278. BIOMAR, Elsevier, Amsterdam
Valbonesi, P. , Sartor, G. andFabbri, E. (2003) Characterization of cholinesterase activity in three bivalves inhabiting the North Adriatic sea and their possible use as sentinel organisms for biosurveillanceprogrammes. Sci. Total Environ., 312, pp. 79-88.
Viarengo, A. (1989) Heavy metals in marine invertebrates: mechanisms of regulation and toxicity at the cellular level.CRC Critic.. Rev. Aquat. Sci., 1, pp. 295-317. English

704. Koppenhofer, A. M. New Products for Surface Feeding Insect Pests in Turfgrass. 2008; 14, (10): 1-2.


Rec #: 2250
Keywords: NO CONC,NO DURATION
Call Number: NO CONC (ACP,BFT,CBL,CPY,DM,HFZ,IMC,LCYT,PMR,TCF), NO DURATION (ACP,BFT,CBL,CPY,DM,HFZ,IMC,LCYT,PMR,TCF)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: ACP,BFT,CBL,CPY,DM,HFZ,HMN,IMC,LCYT,PMR,SS,TCF

705. Korade, D. L. and Fulekar, M. H. Rhizosphere Remediation of Chlorpyrifos in Mycorrhizospheric Soil Using Ryegrass. SOIL; 2009; 172, (2/3): 1344-1350.


Rec #: 2750
Keywords: FATE
Call Number: NO FATE (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

706. Korth, W.; Thomas, M.; Foster, S.; McCorkelle, G., and Bowmer, K. H. Toxicity of Rice and Maize Pesticides to Ceriodaphnia sp.: Implications for Management of Irrigation Drainage Water in Australia. 6185//: 1995; 1, 55-62.


Rec #: 990
Keywords: EFFLUENT
Call Number: NO EFFLUENT (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

707. Kotonia, C. A.; Liapis, K. S., and Ziogas, V. N. Determination of residues of 14 insecticides and metabolites in grapes and peaches by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. 2007; 16, (3): 223-226.


Rec #: 63049
Keywords: SURVEY
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: In this study, a multiresidue method has been validated for the quantification and confirmation of 14 insecticides and metabolites in grapes and peaches. A system of GC-MS with Ion Trap technology and external ion source, operated in the electron impact mode, was used for pesticide residues. Fourteen pesticides and metabolites of four different chemical groups (organophosphorus, pyrethroides, carbamates and cyclodiene organochlorine) were determined, and both recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were calculated at two concentration levels, at the limit of quantification (LOQ) and ten times higher for peaches, and at the LOQ for grapes. For each compound one ion was selected for quantification and at least two more for identification and confirmation. In the case of peaches and at the lower fortification level, recovery values ranged from 84 to 123% for chlorpyrifos ethyl, parathion methyl, paraoxon methyl and a-cypermethrin with RSD values from 7.9 to 33.3%. At the higher fortification level. recoveries were 81.5-91.3% with RSD values from 2.2 to 6.5%. In the case of grapes, recoveries ranged from 56.8 to 112% for methamidophos, endosulfan sulfate, alpha-endosulfan, paraoxon ethyl and b-endosulfan with RSD values from 1.2 to 10.1%.
Keywords: insecticides, multiresidue method, grapes, peaches, gas-chromatography,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 152LU

708. Koumbi, L. J.; Papadopoulos, N. G.; Anastassiadou, V.; Machaira, M.; Kafetzis, D. A., and Papaevangelou, V. Dendritic Cells in Uninfected Infants Born to Hepatitis B Virus-Positive Mothers.


Rec #: 51539
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Oct 15;172(8):1037-40 (medline /15994468)
COMMENTS: Cites: Thorax. 1998 Nov;53(11):913-4 (medline /10193386)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Feb;20(2):234-42 (medline /15683426)
COMMENTS: Cites: Vaccine. 1998 Aug-Sep;16(14-15):1415-9 (medline /9711781)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Infect Dis. 1985 Apr;151(4):599-603 (medline /3973412)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2004 Mar 5;303(5663):1529-31 (medline /14976261)
COMMENTS: Cites: Allergy. 2009 Mar;64(3):375-86 (medline /19175599)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Immunol. 2004 Nov 15;173(10):5935-43 (medline /15528327)
COMMENTS: Cites: Blood. 1994 Dec 15;84(12):4333-43 (medline /7994049)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1990 Sep;87(17):6599-603 (medline /2395863)
COMMENTS: Cites: Blood. 2004 Feb 1;103(3):1030-2 (medline /14504106)
COMMENTS: Cites: Eur J Immunol. 2001 Oct;31(10):3026-37 (medline /11592079)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Clin Immunol. 2004 Nov;24(6):637-46 (medline /15622448)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Hepatol. 2007 Dec;47(6):751-9 (medline /17920718)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol. 2005 May;79(9):5507-15 (medline /15827165)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1992 Nov 1;89(21):10006-10 (medline /1438190)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1983 Feb;117(2):213-22 (medline /6402925)
COMMENTS: Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2002 Apr;32(4):537-42 (medline /11972599)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 1999 Jun 11;284(5421):1835-7 (medline /10364556)
COMMENTS: Cites: Hum Immunol. 2002 Dec;63(12):1103-10 (medline /12480253)
COMMENTS: Cites: Clin Immunol. 2008 Mar;126(3):243-50 (medline /18201932)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Apr 13;101(15):5598-603 (medline /15034168)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Virol Methods. 2002 May 16;103(2):201-12 (medline /12008014)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Immunol. 2009 Oct 1;183(7):4440-8 (medline /19734213)
COMMENTS: Cites: Clin Immunol. 2006 Dec;121(3):251-9 (medline /17010668)
COMMENTS: Cites: Hepatology. 2003 Nov;38(5):1075-86 (medline /14578844)
COMMENTS: Cites: Pathol Biol (Paris). 2002 Nov;50(9):568-75 (medline /12490422)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cell Immunol. 2002 Jul-Aug;218(1-2):74-86 (medline /12470615)
COMMENTS: Cites: Chin Med J (Engl). 2002 Sep;115(9):1380-2 (medline /12411117)
COMMENTS: Cites: Immunol Cell Biol. 2005 Oct;83(5):571-7 (medline /16174109)
ABSTRACT: Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a central role in antiviral immunity, detecting viruses via Toll-like receptors (TLR) and producing in response vast amounts of type I interferons (IFNs). Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic infection after vertical transmission. This study investigated whether an HBV-infected maternal environment might influence DC numbers and pDC function in uninfected infants. Blood was collected from inactive HBsAg carrier and control mothers and their infants at birth and 1 and 6 months of age. HBV DNA was measured in maternal and neonatal perinatal sera using real-time PCR. The circulating frequencies of myeloid DCs (mDCs) and pDCs were determined in the babies by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and cord blood pDCs were stimulated with resiquimod, and alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) production and the pDC phenotype were assessed. The effect of the common-cold virus, rhinovirus (RV), on resiquimod stimulation was also determined. HBV DNA was detected in 62.3% of the mothers and 41% of their infants. DC numbers and pDC functions were similar between subjects and controls and were not correlated with maternal or neonatal viremia. RV infection did not induce pDC maturation until the age of 6 months, and it reduced TLR7-dependent resiquimod-induced IFN-alpha production similarly in both groups. Although the DC system is immature at birth, DCs of uninfected neonates of HBV-positive mothers are competent to initiate and maintain T-cell responses. RV is a weak inducer of IFN-alpha production until the age of 6 months and inhibits IFN-alpha responses triggered by the TLR7 pathway.
MESH HEADINGS: Adult
MESH HEADINGS: Case-Control Studies
MESH HEADINGS: Dendritic Cells/*immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Female
MESH HEADINGS: Flow Cytometry
MESH HEADINGS: Hepatitis B/immunology/transmission
MESH HEADINGS: Hepatitis B virus/*immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Imidazoles/pharmacology
MESH HEADINGS: Infant
MESH HEADINGS: Infant, Newborn
MESH HEADINGS: Male
MESH HEADINGS: Maternal-Fetal Exchange/*immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Mothers
MESH HEADINGS: Pregnancy
MESH HEADINGS: Viremia eng

709. Koureas, Michalis; Tsakalof, Andreas; Tsatsakis, Aristidis, and Hadjichristodoulou, Christos. Systematic review of biomonitoring studies to determine the association between exposure to organophosphorus and pyrethroid insecticides and human health outcomes: Advances on biomonitoring and exposure assessment for pesticides and persistent organic pollutants. 2012 Apr 25-; 210, (2): 155-168.


Rec #: 3250
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: For the appropriate protection of human health it is necessary to accurately estimate the health effects of human exposure to toxic compounds. In the present review, epidemiological studies on the health effects of human exposure to organophosphorus (OP) and pyrethroid (PYR) insecticides have been critically assessed. This review is focused on studies where the exposure assessment was based on quantification of specific biomarkers in urine or plasma. The 49 studies reviewed used different epidemiological approaches and analytical methods as well as different exposure assessment methodologies. With regard to OP pesticides, the studies reviewed suggested negative effects of prenatal exposure to these pesticides on neurodevelopment and male reproduction. Neurologic effects on adults, DNA damage and adverse birth outcomes were also associated with exposure to OP pesticides. With regard to exposure to PYR pesticides, there are currently few studies investigating the adverse health outcomes due to these pesticides. The effects studied in relation to PYR exposure were mainly male reproductive effects (sperm quality, sperm DNA damage and reproductive hormone disorders). StudiesÇÖ findings provided evidence to support the hypothesis that PYR exposure is adversely associated with effects on the male reproductive system. Biomarkers/ Exposure assessment/ Organophosphates/ Pesticides/ Pesticides health effects/ Pyrethroids

710. Kozawa, K.; Aoyama, Y.; Mashimo, S., and Kimura, H. Toxicity and actual regulation of organophosphate pesticides. 2009; 28, (4): 245-254.


Rec #: 63079
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are widely used as agricultural or domestic insecticides and are necessary for maintaining a good-quality, stable supply of harvested farm products. OPs can, however, exert significant adverse effects on human health. Thus, it may be necessary to regulate usage of OPs and other chemical pesticides. In this review, to better understand the effects of pesticides including OPs on humans, we focus on their toxicity and actual regulation.
Keywords: Acetylcholine esterase, neurotoxicity, malathion, aerial spraying,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 536MH

711. Kramer, Kirsten E; Rice, Pamela J; Horgan, Brian P; Rittenhouse, Jennifer L; King, Kevin W, and Kramer, Kirsten E. Pesticide Transport With Runoff From Turf: Observations Compared With Turfpq Model Simulations. 2009; 38, (6): 2402-2411.


Rec #: 45249
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Pesticides applied to turf grass have been detected in surface waters raising concerns of their effect on water quality and interest in their source, hydrological transport and use of models to predict transport. TurfPQ, a pesticide runoff model for turf grass, predicts pesticide transport but has not been rigorously validated for larger storms. The objective of this study was to determine TurfPQ's ability to accurately predict the transport of pesticides with runoff following more intense precipitation. The study was conducted with creeping bentgrass [Agrostis palustris Huds.] turf managed as a golf course fairway. A pesticide mixture containing dicamba, 2,4-D, MCPP, flutolanil, and chlorpyrifos was applied to six adjacent 24.4 by 6.1 m plots. Controlled rainfall simulations were conducted using a rainfall simulator designed to deliver water droplets similar to natural rain. Runoff flow rates and volume were measured and water samples were collected for analysis of pesticide concentrations. Six simulations yielded 13 events with which to test TurfPQ. Measured mean percentage of applied pesticide recovered in the runoff for dicamba, 2,4-D, MCPP, flutolanil, and chlorpyrifos was 24.6, 20.7, 14.9, 5.9, and 0.8%, respectively. The predicted mean values produced by TurfPQ were 13.7, 15.6, 15.5, 2.5, and 0.2%, respectively. The model produced correlations of r = 0.56 and 0.64 for curve number hydrology and measured hydrology, respectively. Comparisons of the model estimates with our field observations indicate that TurfPQ under predicted pesticide runoff during 69.5 c 11.4 mm, 1.9 c 0.2 h, simulated storms.
Keywords: Q5 01503:Characteristics, behavior and fate
Keywords: water quality
Keywords: Runoff models
Keywords: Q2 02243:Structure, mechanics and thermodynamics
Keywords: Storm Runoff
Keywords: Water sampling
Keywords: Simulators
Keywords: ENA 09:Land Use & Planning
Keywords: Grasses
Keywords: Surface water
Keywords: Water Analysis
Keywords: Pesticide transport
Keywords: Rainfall
Keywords: Correlations
Keywords: SW 3030:Effects of pollution
Keywords: M2 551.578.1:Liquid (551.578.1)
Keywords: Current observations
Keywords: Water quality
Keywords: Environmental factors
Keywords: Storms
Keywords: Flow rates
Keywords: Rainfall simulators
Keywords: Hydrologic Models
Keywords: Agricultural Chemicals
Keywords: Flow Rates
Keywords: Environmental effects
Keywords: 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid
Keywords: Hydrology
Keywords: Pollution Abstracts; Environment Abstracts; Water Resources Abstracts; Aqualine Abstracts; ASFA 3: Aquatic Pollution & Environmental Quality; ASFA 2: Ocean Technology Policy & Non-Living Resources; Meteorological & Geoastrophysical Abstracts
Keywords: Agrostis palustris
Keywords: Hydrologic analysis
Keywords: Rainfall runoff
Keywords: P 2000:FRESHWATER POLLUTION
Keywords: Simulation
Keywords: turf
Keywords: AQ 00003:Monitoring and Analysis of Water and Wastes
Keywords: Precipitation
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Turf Grasses
Keywords: Numerical simulations
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Rainfall-runoff modeling
Keywords: Golf courses
Keywords: Environmental quality
Keywords: Runoff
Date revised - 2010-02-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 2402-2411
ProQuest ID - 21259775
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Simulators; Pesticides; Environmental effects; Hydrology; Simulation; Water quality; Current observations; Environmental factors; Runoff; Runoff models; Hydrologic analysis; Rainfall runoff; Pesticide transport; Correlations; Precipitation; Storms; Rainfall simulators; Numerical simulations; Rainfall-runoff modeling; Environmental quality; water quality; Water sampling; Grasses; Surface water; Rainfall; turf; Flow rates; Chlorpyrifos; 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid; Golf courses; Turf Grasses; Hydrologic Models; Agricultural Chemicals; Flow Rates; Storm Runoff; Water Analysis; Agrostis palustris
Last updated - 2012-03-29
British nursing index edition - Journal of Environmental Quality [J. Environ. Qual.]. Vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 2402-2411. 2009.
Corporate institution author - Kramer, Kirsten E; Rice, Pamela J; Horgan, Brian P; Rittenhouse, Jennifer L; King, Kevin W
DOI - MD-0012662015; 11840061; CS1013667; 0047-2425; 1537-2537 English

712. Kravvariti, Konstantina; Tsiropoulos, Nikolaos G; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G, and Kravvariti, Konstantina. Degradation and Adsorption of Terbuthylazine and Chlorpyrifos in Biobed Biomixtures From Composted Cotton Crop Residues. 2010 Oct; 66, (10): 1122-1128.


Rec #: 40309
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: BACKGROUND: Biobeds have been well studied in northern Europe, whereas little is known regarding their use in southern Europe. The degradation and adsorption of terbuthylazine (TA) and chlorpyrifos (CP) were studied in three different biomixtures composed of composted cotton crop residues, soil and straw in various proportions, and also in sterilised and non-sterilised soil. RESULTS: Compost biomixtures degraded the less hydrophobic TA at a faster rate than soil, while the opposite was evident for the more hydrophobic CP. These results were attributed to the rapid abiotic hydrolysis of CP in the alkaline soil (pH 8.5) compared with the lower pH of the compost (6.6), but also to the increasing adsorption (Kd = 746 mL g-1) and reduced bioavailability of CP in the biomixtures compared with soil (Kd = 17 mL g-1), as verified by the adsorption studies. CONCLUSIONS: Compost had a dual but contrasting effect on degradation that depended on the chemical nature of the pesticide studied: a positive effect towards TA owing to increasing biodegradation and a negative effect towards CP owing to increasing adsorption. Overall, composted cotton crop residues could be potentially used in local biobed systems in Greece, as they promoted the degradation of hydrophilic pesticides and the adsorption of hydrophobic pesticides.
Keywords: Compost
Keywords: SW 3050:Ultimate disposal of wastes
Keywords: Cotton
Keywords: crop residues
Keywords: Greece
Keywords: Degradation
Keywords: AQ 00008:Effects of Pollution
Keywords: Hydrogen Ion Concentration
Keywords: Europe
Keywords: Hydrolysis
Keywords: Crops
Keywords: ENA 06:Food & Drugs
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Soil
Keywords: Agricultural Chemicals
Keywords: Water Resources Abstracts; Environment Abstracts; Aqualine Abstracts
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Adsorption
Keywords: Straw
Keywords: pH
Date revised - 2012-06-01
Language of summary - English
Location - Greece; Europe
Pages - 1122-1128
ProQuest ID - 1020854293
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Chlorpyrifos; Compost; Soil; crop residues; Cotton; Degradation; Pesticides; Adsorption; pH; Agricultural Chemicals; Hydrogen Ion Concentration; Straw; Hydrolysis; Crops; Greece; Europe
Last updated - 2012-07-27
British nursing index edition - Pest Management Science [Pest Manage. Sci.]. Vol. 66, no. 10, pp. 1122-1128. Oct 2010.
Corporate institution author - Kravvariti, Konstantina; Tsiropoulos, Nikolaos G; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G
DOI - e306975b-da97-45d9-9208csamfg201; 16710353; 1526-4998 English

713. Kretschmann, A.; Ashauer, R.; Hollender, J., and Escher, B. I. Toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic model for diazinon toxicity-mechanistic explanation of differences in the sensitivity of Daphnia magna and Gammarus pulex. 2012; 31, (9): 2014-2022.


Rec #: 63129
Keywords: MODELING
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract:
1   ...   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   ...   151


The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2016
send message

    Main page