Appendix 2-5: Rejected ecotox bibliography for Chlorpyrifos



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This review describes the most recent progress in biotechnological approaches for enhancing the capability of microorganisms and plants through the characterization and transfer of pesticide-degrading genes, induction of catabolic pathways, and display of cell surface enzymes.
Keywords: biodegradation, pesticides, phytoremediation, pesticide-degrading genes,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 506WB

586. Ibrahim, H. A.; Abu-Egla, M. H.; El-Sayad, H. I., and El-Gammal, H. Effects of Chlorpyrifos, Methamidophos and Sulprofos on Myelin Sheath Development of Chicken Embryos. 1991; 2, 245-262.


Rec #: 900
Keywords: NO SOURCE
Call Number: NO SOURCE (CPY,MTM)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY,MTM

587. Iizuka, Toshiaki; Maeda, Satoshi, and Shimizu, Akio. Removal of Pesticide Residue in Cherry Tomato by Hydrostatic Pressure. (0).


Rec #: 3360
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: The reduction of Chlorpyrifos (CP) in cherry tomatoes by High Hydrostatic Pressure (HHP) treatment was demonstrated and compared with other washing methods. CP is commonly used as a broad-spectrum insecticide in pest control, and high residual levels have been detected in vegetables. Samples were treated at several pressures (0.1-400 MPa) and at two temperatures (5 or 25-_C) for 30 min. The optimum HHP conditions for reducing CP were around 75 MPa at 5-_C, and the removal rate was about 75%. This removal rate is slightly higher than other treatments such as soaking in ethanol solution and ultrasonic, accompanied by no visual changes (color, size and shape) in appearance. Also, no toxic intermediates were identified in the extracts of the high-pressure treated cherry tomatoes under these experimental conditions. The present results indicate that HHP can be a useful choice for removing residual pesticides. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP)/ Pesticide residues/ Chlorpyrifos/ Cherry tomato

588. Ilyinskii, P. O.; Meriin, A. B.; Gabai, V. L.; Zhirnov, O. P.; Thoidis, G., and Shneider, A. M. Prime-Boost Vaccination With a Combination of Proteosome-Degradable and Wild-Type Forms of Two Influenza Proteins Leads to Augmented Ctl Response.


Rec #: 51269
Keywords: BENEFICIAL EFFECT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: ABSTRACT: Targeting viral antigens for proteosomal degradation has previously been proposed as a means for immunogenicity augmentation. However, utilization of modified unstable antigens may be insufficient for potent T-cell cross-presentation by APCs, a mechanism that requires high levels of the antigenic protein. Therefore, we hypothesized that a recombinant vaccine utilizing a combination of proteosome-sensitive and proteosome-resistant versions of an antigen in a prime-boost regimen may provide the most efficient CTL response. To address this hypothesis, we utilized conserved proteosome-resistant influenza A virus proteins M1 and NS1. Unstable versions of these polypeptides were constructed by destroying their 3D structure via truncations or short insertions into predicted alpha-helical structures. These modified polypeptides were stabilized in the presence of the proteosome inhibitor MG132, strongly suggesting that they are degraded via a ubiquitin-proteosome pathway. Importantly, with both M1 and NS1antigens, homologous DNA vaccination with a mixture of unstable and proteosome-resistant wt forms of these proteins resulted in significantly higher CTL activity than vaccination with either wt or degradable forms. The most dramatic effect was seen with NS1, where homologous immunization with a mixture of these two forms was the only regimen that produced a notable elevation of CTL response, compared to vaccination with the wt NS1. Additionally, for M1 protein, heterologous vaccination utilizing the unstable form as prime and wild-type form as boost, demonstrated significant augmentation of the CTL response. These data indicate that combining proteosome-sensitive and proteosome-resistant forms of an antigen during vaccination is advantageous.
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: Antigens, Viral/genetics/*immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: *Cytotoxicity, Immunologic
MESH HEADINGS: Immunization, Secondary
MESH HEADINGS: Influenza Vaccines/*immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Mice
MESH HEADINGS: Mice, Inbred BALB C
MESH HEADINGS: Mutagenesis, Insertional
MESH HEADINGS: Sequence Deletion
MESH HEADINGS: Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics/immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Viral Matrix Proteins/genetics/*immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics/*immunology/metabolism eng

589. Ion, Alina C; Ion, Ion; Culetu, Alina; Gherase, Dragos; Moldovan, Carmen a; Iosub, Rodica; Dinescu, Adrian, and Ion, Alina C. Acetylcholinesterase Voltammetric Biosensors Based on Carbon Nanostructure-Chitosan Composite Material for Organophosphate Pesticides. 2010 Jul 20; 30, (6): 817-821.


Rec #: 47799
Keywords: METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A sensitive biosensor for chloropyrifos (CPF), an organophosphorus pesticide, was developed by immobilizing acetylcholinesterase (AChE) through covalent bonding to an oxidized exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnPs)-chitosan cross-linked composite. Because of the increased surface area and the conductive properties of the nanomaterial, AChE developed a high affinity for acetylthiocholine (ATCI) and formed thiocholine with a fast response. The response of the sensor was a linear function of ATCI concentration in two segments, one from 0.005 to 0.039mM and the second from 0.064mM to 0.258mM. The corresponding equation for the first range was i p(A)=2.26A-10a5 c +4.39A-10a7 (R 2 =0.992) and the equation for the second was ip(A)=6.80A-10a6 c +1.30A-10a6 (R 2 =1.000), with a detection limit of 1.58A-10a10 M. The fabrication of the sensor was simple, the response was fast and the stability acceptable. This sensor has many potential applications, the foremost being in organophosphorus pesticides.
Keywords: Biosensors
Keywords: Pesticides (organophosphorus)
Keywords: composite materials
Keywords: Graphite
Keywords: Carbon
Keywords: Mathematical models
Keywords: Acetylcholinesterase
Keywords: Surface area
Keywords: Biotechnology and Bioengineering Abstracts
Keywords: W 30920:Tissue Engineering
Date revised - 2011-01-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 817-821
ProQuest ID - 787220863
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Biosensors; Pesticides (organophosphorus); composite materials; Graphite; Carbon; Mathematical models; Acetylcholinesterase; Surface area
Last updated - 2012-03-29
British nursing index edition - Materials Science and Engineering C: Biomimetic and Supramolecular Systems [Mater. Sci. Eng. C Biomimetic Supramol. Syst.]. Vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 817-821. 20 Jul 2010.
Corporate institution author - Ion, Alina C; Ion, Ion; Culetu, Alina; Gherase, Dragos; Moldovan, Carmen A; Iosub, Rodica; Dinescu, Adrian
DOI - 3d65a48e-c711-467b-b7a7csaobj202; 13663912; 0928-4931 English

590. Ippolito, a ; Carolli, M; Varolo, E; Villa, S; Vighi, M, and Ippolito, A. Evaluating Pesticide Effects on Freshwater Invertebrate Communities in Alpine Environment: a Model Ecosystem Experiment. 2012; 21, (7): 2051-2067.


Rec #: 46469
Keywords: MIXTURE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Pesticide loads in streams are potentially one of the most relevant stressors for macroinvertebrate communities. Nevertheless, real effects provoked at the community level are still largely unknown. Model ecosystems are frequently used as tools for the risk assessment of pesticides, especially for their regulation, however, they can be also applied to site-specific risk assessment in order to gain better understanding of the responses of aquatic ecosystems to chemical stress. In the present work, an experimental system was composed of 5 artificial streams that reproduced a mountain lotic environment under controlled conditions. This study was aimed to better understand, whether (and how) the biological community was influenced by pesticides pulse exposures. 5 mixture load events were simulated over the productive season (March-July 2010): biological community was regularly sampled and nominal concentrations of water were tested. The results were interpreted comparing the output of different metrics and statistical methodologies. The sensitivity of different metrics was analyzed considering single exposure events (maximum Toxic Units) as well as overall temporal trends. Results showed how some common taxonomic metrics (e.g. taxa richness, Shannon's index, total abundance of organisms, and the Extended Biotic Index) were not suitable to identify the effects of pesticides at community level. On the contrary EPT%, SPEAR sub(pesticide) and the Principal Response Curve methodology proved to be sensitive to this kind of stress, providing comparable results. Temporal trends of these metrics proved to be related to the concentration of chemicals. Remarkably, the first Principal Response Curve illustrates the trend followed by the most vulnerable species, while the second is more related to the trend of opportunistic species. A high potential risk for the invertebrate community was highlighted by a statistically significant decline of 40 points (comparison with the control) in both SPEAR sub(pesticide) and EPT%.
Keywords: Risk assessment
Keywords: Statistics
Keywords: Ecology Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts; Pollution Abstracts
Keywords: Freshwater environments
Keywords: Abundance
Keywords: Statistical analysis
Keywords: Stress
Keywords: Aquatic ecosystems
Keywords: Streams
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Models
Keywords: Mountains
Keywords: Risk factors
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Controlled conditions
Keywords: Invertebrata
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Alpine environments
Date revised - 2012-09-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 2051-2067
ProQuest ID - 1143574043
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Risk assessment; Statistics; Freshwater environments; Abundance; Statistical analysis; Stress; Aquatic ecosystems; Streams; Models; Mountains; Risk factors; Pesticides; Controlled conditions; Alpine environments; Invertebrata
Last updated - 2012-11-08
Corporate institution author - Ippolito, A; Carolli, M; Varolo, E; Villa, S; Vighi, M
DOI - OB-944a4aee-08e7-4012-b10emfgefd101; 17187662; 0963-9292; 1573-3017 English

591. Ippolito, a ; Todeschini, R; Vighi, M, and Ippolito, A. Sensitivity Assessment of Freshwater Macroinvertebrates to Pesticides Using Biological Traits. 2012 Mar; 21, (2): 336-352.


Rec #: 46829
Keywords: REVIEW,MODELING
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Assessing the sensitivity of different species to chemicals is one of the key points in predicting the effects of toxic compounds in the environment. Trait-based predicting methods have proved to be extremely efficient for assessing the sensitivity of macroinvertebrates toward compounds with non specific toxicity (narcotics). Nevertheless, predicting the sensitivity of organisms toward compounds with specific toxicity is much more complex, since it depends on the mode of action of the chemical. The aim of this work was to predict the sensitivity of several freshwater macroinvertebrates toward three classes of plant protection products: organophosphates, carbamates and pyrethroids. Two databases were built: one with sensitivity data (retrieved, evaluated and selected from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ECOTOX database) and the other with biological traits. Aside from the "traditional" traits usually considered in ecological analysis (i.e. body size, respiration technique, feeding habits, etc.), multivariate analysis was used to relate the sensitivity of organisms to some other characteristics which may be involved in the process of intoxication. Results confirmed that, besides traditional biological traits, related to uptake capability (e.g. body size and body shape) some traits more related to particular metabolic characteristics or patterns have a good predictive capacity on the sensitivity to these kinds of toxic substances. For example, behavioral complexity, assumed as an indicator of nervous system complexity, proved to be an important predictor of sensitivity towards these compounds. These results confirm the need for more complex traits to predict effects of highly specific substances. One key point for achieving a complete mechanistic understanding of the process is the choice of traits, whose role in the discrimination of sensitivity should be clearly interpretable, and not only statistically significant.
Keywords: Intoxication
Keywords: Chemicals
Keywords: D 04070:Pollution
Keywords: Toxic substances
Keywords: ENA 09:Land Use & Planning
Keywords: Plant protection
Keywords: Organophosphates
Keywords: Respiration
Keywords: Statistical analysis
Keywords: body size
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Nervous system
Keywords: intoxication
Keywords: Multivariate analysis
Keywords: Body size
Keywords: Pyrethroids
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Sensitivity
Keywords: Feeding
Keywords: Data processing
Keywords: Freshwater environments
Keywords: P 2000:FRESHWATER POLLUTION
Keywords: Narcotics
Keywords: Ecology Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts; Environment Abstracts; Pollution Abstracts
Keywords: organophosphates
Keywords: Toxicity
Keywords: Pesticides (carbamates)
Keywords: EPA
Keywords: Databases
Keywords: USA
Keywords: Pesticides
Date revised - 2012-04-01
Language of summary - English
Location - USA
Pages - 336-352
ProQuest ID - 922902713
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Intoxication; Feeding; Data processing; Plant protection; Freshwater environments; Respiration; Statistical analysis; Narcotics; Toxicity; organophosphates; Pesticides (carbamates); Databases; Nervous system; Multivariate analysis; Pesticides; Body size; Pyrethroids; Chemicals; EPA; Sensitivity; intoxication; Toxic substances; Organophosphates; body size; USA
Last updated - 2012-04-12
Corporate institution author - Ippolito, A; Todeschini, R; Vighi, M
DOI - OB-861b5eea-3f93-4053-9fe1mfgefd107; 16335286; 0963-9292; 1573-3017 English

592. Ishtiaq, M. and Saleem, M. A. Generating Susceptible Strain and Resistance Status of Field Populations of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Against Some Conventional and New Chemistry Insecticides in Pakistan. 2011; 104, (4): 1343-1348.


Rec #: 2330
Keywords: NO DURATION
Call Number: NO DURATION (CPY,CYP,DM,MFZ,PFF)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: ABM,CPY,CYP,DM,EMMB,IDC,LUF,MFZ,PFF,SS

593. Islam, S. M. A.; Math, R. K.; Cho, K. M.; Lim, W. J.; Hong, S. Y.; Kim, J. M.; Yun, M. G.; Cho, J. J., and Yun, H. D. Organophosphorus Hydrolase (OpdB) of Lactobacillus brevis WCP902 from Kimchi Is Able To Degrade Organophosphorus Pesticides. 2010; 58, (9): 5380-5386.


Rec #: 61939
Keywords: BACTERIA
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Lactobacillus brevis WCP902 that is capable of biodegrading chlorpyrifos was isolated from kimchi. The opdB gene cloned from this strain revealed 825 bp, encoding 274 aa, and an enzyme molecular weight of about 27 kDa. OpdB contains the same Gly-X-Ser-X-Gly motif found in most bacterial and eukaryotic esterase, lipase, and serine hydrolases, yet it is a novel member of the GDSVG family of esterolytic enzymes. Its conserved serine residue, Ser82, is significantly involved with enzyme activity that may have application for removing some pesticides. Optimum organophosphorus hydrolase (OpdB) activity appeared at pH 6.0 and 35 degrees C and during degradation of chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, diazinon, methylparathion, and parathion.
Keywords: Kimchi, pesticide-degrading bacterium, Lactobacillus brevis, opdB gene,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 590OW

594. Ismail, A. A.; Bodner, T. E., and Rohlman, D. S. Neurobehavioral performance among agricultural workers and pesticide applicators: a meta-analytic study. 2012; 69, (7): 457-464.


Rec #: 61949
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Chronic low level exposure of agricultural workers and applicators to pesticides has been found to be associated with different degrees of decrement in cognitive and psychomotor functions. The goal of this study was to use meta-analysis to (1) identify and quantify neurobehavioral deficits among agricultural workers and pesticide applicators, and (2) analyse the potential confounders or moderators of these neurobehavioral deficits. Seventeen studies, reporting on 21 independent cohort groups, were included in the meta-analysis. These studies involved 16 neuropsychological tests providing 23 different performance measures that constitute the neurobehavioral constructs. All tests and measures of the neurobehavioral functions of attention, visuomotor integration, verbal abstraction and perception constructs showed significant decrements for exposed participants. One out of three tests of memory, two of five tests of sustained attention, and four of eight tests of motor speed constructs also showed significant decrements. Nine out of these 15 effect size distributions demonstrated significant heterogeneity across cohorts. A search for cohort-level variables (eg, agricultural workers vs applicators, duration of exposure, age and percentage of male participants) to explain this heterogeneity was largely unsuccessful. However, for one test, Block Design, the duration of exposure was positively associated with performance decrements. Furthermore, it was also found that performance decrements on this test were smaller for older participants. Increasing the number of studies and using more consistent methodologies in field studies are needed.
Keywords: LONG-TERM EXPOSURE, CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM, ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDES,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 958AI

595. Ismail, B. S. and Ngan, C. K. Dissipation of Chlorothalonil, Chlorpyrifos, and Profenofos in a Malaysian Agricultural Soil: A Comparison Between the Field Experiment and Simulation by the PERSIST Model. School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia. ismail@pkrisc.cc.ukm.my//: SOIL; 2005; 40, (2): 341-353.


Rec #: 2230
Keywords: FATE
Call Number: NO FATE (CPY,CTN,PFF)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY,CTN,PFF

596. Istamboulie, Georges; Cortina-Puig, Montserrat; Marty, Jean-Louis, and Noguer, Thierry. The Use of Artificial Neural Networks for the Selective Detection of Two Organophosphate Insecticides: Chlorpyrifos and Chlorfenvinfos. 2009 Jul 15; 79, (2): 507-511.


Rec #: 41109
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Amperometric acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensors have been developed to resolve mixtures of chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) and chlorfenvinfos (CFV) pesticides. Three different biosensors were built using the wild type from electric eel (EE), the genetically modified Drosophila melanogaster AChE B394 and B394 co-immobilized with a phosphotriesterase (PTE). Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) were used to model the combined response of the two pesticides. Specifically two different ANNs were constructed. The first one was used to model the combined response of B394+PTE and EE biosensors and was applied when the concentration of CPO was high and the other, modelling the combined response of B394+PTE and B394 biosensors, was applied with low concentrations of CPO. In both cases, good prediction ability was obtained with correlation coefficients better than 0.986 when the obtained values were compared with those expected for a set of six external test samples not used for training.
Keywords: 2921-88-2
Keywords: Organophosphorus Compounds -- analysis
Keywords: Animals
Keywords: Enzymes, Immobilized
Keywords: 470-90-6
Keywords: Neural Networks (Computer)
Keywords: Acetylcholinesterase
Keywords: Chlorfenvinphos -- analysis
Keywords: Chlorfenvinphos
Keywords: EC 3.1.8.-
Keywords: Biosensing Techniques -- methods
Keywords: Insecticides -- analysis
Keywords: Biosensing Techniques -- standards
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- analysis
Keywords: Organophosphorus Compounds
Keywords: 0
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: Phosphoric Triester Hydrolases
Keywords: EC 3.1.1.7
Keywords: Models, Theoretical
Date completed - 2009-09-09
Date created - 2009-06-29
Date revised - 2012-12-20
Language of summary - English
Pages - 507-511
ProQuest ID - 67437374
Last updated - 2013-01-19
British nursing index edition - Talanta, July 15, 2009, 79(2):507-511
Corporate institution author - Istamboulie, Georges; Cortina-Puig, Montserrat; Marty, Jean-Louis; Noguer, Thierry
DOI - MEDL-19559912; 19559912; 1873-3573 eng

597. Istamboulie, Georges; Durbiano, Romain; Fournier, Didier; Marty, Jean-Louis, and Noguer, Thierry. Biosensor-controlled degradation of chlorpyrifos and chlorfenvinfos using a phosphotriesterase-based detoxification column. 2010 Jan; 78, (1): 1-6.


Rec #: 2080
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: This works presents the development of a detoxification system based on bacterial phosphotriesterase (PTE) for the degradation of organophosphate (OP) insecticides in water. PTE was immobilised on an activated agarose gel via covalent coupling. Two different OPs were studied, chlorpyrifos and chlorfenvinfos, due to their importance in the field of water policy. The efficiency of insecticide degradation was controlled using a highly sensitive biosensor allowing the detection of OP concentration as low as 0.004 ++g LęĆ1. Under optimum conditions, it was shown that a column incorporating 500 IU of PTE was suitable for the detoxification of solutions containing either isolated pesticides or pesticides mixtures, even at concentrations higher than authorized limits. Finally, the method was shown to be adapted to the decontamination of real samples of pesticides with concentrations up to 20 ++g LęĆ1. Decontamination/ Organophosphates/ Phosphotriesterase/ Acetylcholinesterase/ Biosensor

598. Istamboulie, Georges; Fournier, Didier; Marty, Jean-Louis, and Noguer, Thierry. Phosphotriesterase: a Complementary Tool for the Selective Detection of Two Organophosphate Insecticides: Chlorpyrifos and Chlorfenvinfos. 2009 Mar 15; 77, (5): 1627-1631.


Rec #: 41339
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: This work shows the possibility of combining the high sensitivity of genetically-modified Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase (B394) with the ability of phosphotriesterase (PTE) to hydrolyse organophosphate compounds, in the aim of developing a biosensor selective to two insecticides of interest: chlorpyrifos and chlorfenvinfos. The studies clearly demonstrate that chlorfenvinfos is a substrate that acts as competitive inhibitor of PTE, therefore preventing the efficient hydrolysis of other pesticides, including chlorpyrifos. A bi-enzymatic sensor was designed by immobilizing both B394 and PTE in a polyvinylalcohol matrix. The sensor was shown to be able to discriminate between chlorpyrifos and chlorfenvinfos inhibitions.
Keywords: 2921-88-2
Keywords: Organophosphorus Compounds -- analysis
Keywords: Animals
Keywords: 470-90-6
Keywords: Genetic Engineering
Keywords: Chlorfenvinphos -- analysis
Keywords: Chlorfenvinphos
Keywords: EC 3.1.8.-
Keywords: Biosensing Techniques -- methods
Keywords: Phosphoric Triester Hydrolases -- metabolism
Keywords: Insecticides -- analysis
Keywords: Drosophila melanogaster -- enzymology
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- analysis
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Cholinesterase Inhibitors
Keywords: Organophosphorus Compounds
Keywords: 0
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: Cholinesterase Inhibitors -- analysis
Keywords: Phosphoric Triester Hydrolases
Date completed - 2009-02-27
Date created - 2009-01-22
Date revised - 2012-12-20
Language of summary - English
Pages - 1627-1631
ProQuest ID - 66842906
Last updated - 2013-01-19
British nursing index edition - Talanta, March 15, 2009, 77(5):1627-1631
Corporate institution author - Istamboulie, Georges; Fournier, Didier; Marty, Jean-Louis; Noguer, Thierry
DOI - MEDL-19159775; 19159775; 1873-3573 eng

599. Istamboulie, Georges; Sikora, Tomasz; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Marty, Jean-Louis; Noguer, Thierry, and Istamboulie, Georges. Screen-Printed Poly(3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene) (Pedot): a New Electrochemical Mediator for Acetylcholinesterase-Based Biosensors. 2010 Aug 15; 82, (3): 957-961.


Rec #: 47789
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: This work describes the use of a PEDOT:PSS-based conductive polymer for designing AChE-based biosensors. The transducers were obtained directly by screen-printing a PEDOT:PSS suspension on the surface of thick film carbon electrodes. The obtained working electrodes showed a high conductivity when compared with electrodes modified with conventional mediators like cobalt phthalocyanine or tetracyanoquinodimethane. The PEDOT:PSS polymer was shown to be suitable for thiocholine oxidation, allowing the measurement of AChE activity at 100 mV vs Ag/AgCl. The high conductivity of PEDOT:PSS allowed the accurate detection of the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos-oxon at concentrations as low as 4 x 10 super(-9) M, corresponding to an inhibition ratio of 5%.
Keywords: Biosensors
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: Carbon
Keywords: Cobalt
Keywords: Oxidation
Keywords: Electrodes
Keywords: Biotechnology and Bioengineering Abstracts
Keywords: W 30955:Biosensors
Keywords: organophosphates
Date revised - 2010-09-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 957-961
ProQuest ID - 754896436
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Biosensors; Insecticides; Carbon; Cobalt; Oxidation; Electrodes; organophosphates
Last updated - 2011-12-14
British nursing index edition - Talanta [Talanta]. Vol. 82, no. 3, pp. 957-961. 15 Aug 2010.
Corporate institution author - Istamboulie, Georges; Sikora, Tomasz; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Marty, Jean-Louis; Noguer, Thierry
DOI - c47560ae-db14-42ee-a503csaobj202; 13525365; 0039-9140 English

600. Istarnboulie, G.; Andreescu, S.; Marty, J. L., and Noguer, T. Highly sensitive detection of organophosphorus insecticides using magnetic microbeads and genetically engineered acetylcholinesterase. 2007; 23, (4): 506-512.


Rec #: 61969
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: This work presents a biosensor for organophosphorus pesticides based on immobilisation of a highly sensitive genetically engineered acetylcholinesterase (B394) by affinity interactions on metal chelate-functionalised magnetic microbeads. The developed sensor has been compared with those based on the widely used Electric eel cholinesterase and a classical entrapment procedure in a polyvinylalcohol-based matrix. The use of the B394 enzyme allowed lowering both IC50 and LOD by a factor of 100 when compared with Electric eel enzyme sensor. The oriented and site-specific immobilisation combined with the high specificity of the B349 mutant allows a more sensitive detection of insecticides, concentrations as low as 1.3 x 10(-11) M (IC10) being detected for both pesticides chlorpyriphos-oxon and chlorfenvinphos. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: genetically engineered acetylcholinesterase, organophosphorus
ISI Document Delivery No.: 233WE

601. Ito, Y. and Nakajima, T. Pparalpha- and Dehp-Induced Cancers.


Rec #: 51129
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: ABSTRACT: Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a widely used plasticizer and a potentially nongenotoxic carcinogen. Its mechanism had been earlier proposed based on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) because metabolites of DEHP are agonists. However, recent evidence also suggests the involvement of non-PPARalpha multiple pathway in DEHP-induced carcinogenesis. Since there are differences in the function and constitutive expression of PPARalpha among rodents and humans, species differences are also thought to exist in the carcinogenesis. However, species differences were also seen in the lipase activity involved in the first step of the DEHP metabolism, which should be considered in DEHP-induced carcinogenesis. Taken together, it is very difficult to extrapolate the results from rodents to humans in the case of DEHP carcinogenicity. However, PPARalpha-null mice or mice with human PPARalpha gene have been developed, which may lend support to make such a difficult extrapolation. Overall, further mechanical study on DEHP-induced carcinogenicity is warranted using these mice. eng

602. Ivashina, S. A. Interaction of Dursban with Soil Microorganisms. 1987; 3, 75-76(RUS).


Rec #: 910
Keywords: NOT PURSUING,NON-ENGLISH
Call Number: NON-ENGLISH (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

603. Iwai, C B; Noller, B N, and Iwai, C B. Ecotoxicological Assessment of Contaminated Land Using Biomonitoring Tools for Sustainable Land Use in Thailand. 2008 Sep; 14, (2-3): 143-153.


Rec #: 49229
Keywords: REVIEW
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: As a developing country, Thailand has a significant issue with contaminated land and its remediation. Increasing levels of industrial and urban pollution, indiscriminate use of agrichemicals and poorly regulated disposal of a wide variety of hazardous wastes are putting a significant level of pressure on Thailand's ecosystems. There is an urgent need for practical tools to assist with ecological risk assessment of contaminated land in Thailand. Reliance on soil criteria developed for overseas conditions and organisms may provide inadequate protection in Thailand where both soil and ecological receptors are, in many cases, unique to this country. Native soil organisms in Thailand may be more or less sensitive to contaminants compared to overseas test species. Therefore, standardised protocols for evaluating biodiversity and toxicity are being developed using native species with the aim of using locally generated data to better evaluate the ecological risks of contaminants in Thailand.
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