Appendix 2-5: Rejected ecotox bibliography for Chlorpyrifos



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Keywords: Agriculture
Keywords: Occupational Exposure
Keywords: Air Pollutants, Occupational
Keywords: Skin Absorption
Keywords: Humans
Keywords: Insecticides -- urine
Keywords: Insecticides -- analysis
Keywords: Gossypium
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- analysis
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Egypt
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: Half-Life
Keywords: Air Pollutants, Occupational -- analysis
Keywords: Inhalation Exposure
Keywords: Insecticides -- pharmacokinetics
Keywords: Air Pollutants, Occupational -- pharmacokinetics
Keywords: Time Factors
Keywords: Air Pollutants, Occupational -- urine
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- pharmacokinetics
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- urine
Copyright - Copyright Hamilton Hardy Publishing Sep 2012
Language of summary - English
Pages - 198-209
ProQuest ID - 1081330144
Last updated - 2013-01-02
Place of publication - Philadelphia
Corporate institution author - Fenske, Richard A; Farahat, Fayssal M; Galvin, Kit; Fenske, Ellis K; Olson, James R
DOI - 2774688651; 72254902; 49933; NJOH; 23026005; INODNJOH0000615714 English

411. Ferens, W. A. and Hovde, C. J. Escherichia Coli O157:H7: Animal Reservoir and Sources of Human Infection.


Rec #: 50239
Keywords: BACTERIA
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract:
ABSTRACT: This review surveys the literature on carriage and transmission of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 in the context of virulence factors and sampling/culture technique. EHEC of the O157:H7 serotype are worldwide zoonotic pathogens responsible for the majority of severe cases of human EHEC disease. EHEC O157:H7 strains are carried primarily by healthy cattle and other ruminants, but most of the bovine strains are not transmitted to people, and do not exhibit virulence factors associated with human disease. Prevalence of EHEC O157:H7 is probably underestimated. Carriage of EHEC O157:H7 by individual animals is typically short-lived, but pen and farm prevalence of specific isolates may extend for months or years and some carriers, designated as supershedders, may harbor high intestinal numbers of the pathogen for extended periods. The prevalence of EHEC O157:H7 in cattle peaks in the summer and is higher in postweaned calves and heifers than in younger and older animals. Virulent strains of EHEC O157:H7 are rarely harbored by pigs or chickens, but are found in turkeys. The bacteria rarely occur in wildlife with the exception of deer and are only sporadically carried by domestic animals and synanthropic rodents and birds. EHEC O157:H7 occur in amphibian, fish, and invertebrate carriers, and can colonize plant surfaces and tissues via attachment mechanisms different from those mediating intestinal attachment. Strains of EHEC O157:H7 exhibit high genetic variability but typically a small number of genetic types predominate in groups of cattle and a farm environment. Transmission to people occurs primarily via ingestion of inadequately processed contaminated food or water and less frequently through contact with manure, animals, or infected people.
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: *Disease Reservoirs
MESH HEADINGS: Escherichia coli Infections/*transmission
MESH HEADINGS: Escherichia coli O157/*pathogenicity
MESH HEADINGS: Foodborne Diseases/microbiology
MESH HEADINGS: Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome/*microbiology
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Seasons eng

412. Ferguson, A. C.; Bursac, Z.; Biddle, D.; Coleman, S., and Johnson, W. Soil-skin adherence from carpet: Use of a mechanical chamber to control contact parameters. 2008; 43, (12): 1451-1458.


Rec #: 60059
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A computer-controlled mechanical chamber was used to control the contact between carpet samples laden with soil, and human cadaver skin and cotton sheet samples for the measurement of mass soil transfer. Mass soil transfers were converted to adherence factors (mg/cm(2)) for use in models that estimate dermal exposure to contaminants found in soil media. The contact parameters of pressure (10 to 50 kPa) and time (10 to 50 sec) were varied for 369 experiments of mass soil transfer, where two soil types (play sand and lawn soil) and two soil sizes (< 139.7 mu m and >= 139.7 < 381) were used. Chamber probes were used to record temperature and humidity. Log transformation of the sand/soil transfers was performed to normalize the distribution. Estimated adjusted means for experimental conditions were exponentiated in order to express them in the original units. Mean soil mass transfer to cadaver skin (0.74 mg/cm(2)) was higher than to cotton sheets (0.21 mg/cm(2)). Higher pressure (p < 0.0001), and larger particle size (p < 0.0001) were also all associated with larger amounts of soil transfer. The original model was simplified into two by adherence material type (i.e., cadaver skin and cotton sheets) in order to investigate the differential effects of pressure, time, soil size, and soil type on transfer. This research can be used to improve estimates of dermal exposure to contaminants found in home carpets.
Keywords: soil transfer, adherence, soil exposure, mechanical chamber, play sand,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 348QZ

413. Ferguson, D. E. Characteristics and Significance of Resistance to Insecticides in Fishes. 5003//: 1968: 531-536.


Rec #: 1700
Keywords: REFS CHECKED,REVIEW
Call Number: NO REFS CHECKED (AMSV,CPY,DCF,DZ,MLN,MP), NO REVIEW (AMSV,CPY,DCF,DZ,MLN,MP)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: AMSV,CHD,CPY,DCF,DDE,DDT,DZ,EN,MLN,MP,MXC,TXP

414. Ferreira, Enderson P. de B.; Dusi, Andr+ N.; Costa, Jana+ na R.; Xavier, Gustavo R., and Rumjanek, Norma G. Assessing insecticide and fungicide effects on the culturable soil bacterial community by analyses of variance of their DGGE fingerprinting data. 2009 Sep; 45, (5Çô6): 466-472.


Rec #: 4620
Keywords: BACTERIA
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: To assess the effects of three insecticides (aldicarb, chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin) and two fungicides (tebuconazole and metalaxyl-á+-ámancozeb) on the PCR-DGGE fingerprints of culturable soil bacterial communities (CSBC), a greenhouse experiment was carried out with soil samples from an Integrated System for Agroecological Production (ISAP), a Conventional Potato Production Area (CPPA) and a Secondary Forest Area (SFA) close to the CPPA. Samples were obtained at 15 day intervals starting at 32 until 77 days after sowing (DAS) to perform the PCR-DGGE analysis of the CSBC cultured on media amended with soil suspension. Analysis of variance from PCR-DGGE data indicated significant differences among treatments. Regardless the type of pesticide applied, CSBC was disturbed and similarity values varied from 5% to 90% in comparison to the control. Significant shifts on CSBC were only detected among treatments in the first two harvests, while CSBC tended to be more akin to each other at the last two harvest dates. The most significant responses observed were due to different soil sample origins, where values of 5% of similarity to the control were observed on CPPA soil. The use of analysis of variance on PCR-DGGE data was useful to a better understanding of the changes on CSBC induced by pesticides applications. Solanum tuberosum/ 16S rDNA/ Culture-dependent/ Bacterial community structure

415. Ficklin, D. L.; Luo, Y. Z., and Zhang, M. H. Watershed modelling of hydrology and water quality in the Sacramento River watershed, California. 2013; 27, (2): 236-250.


Rec #: 60099
Keywords: MODELING
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Agricultural pollutant runoff is a major source of water contamination in California's Sacramento River watershed where 8500 km2 of agricultural land influences water quality. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrology, sediment, nitrate and pesticide transport components were assessed for the Sacramento River watershed. To represent flood conveyance in the area, the model was improved by implementing a flood routing algorithm. Sensitivity/uncertainty analyses and multi-objective calibration were incorporated into the model application for predicting streamflow, sediment, nitrate and pesticides (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) at multiple watershed sites from 1992 to 2008. Most of the observed data were within the 95% uncertainty interval, indicating that the SWAT simulations were capturing the uncertainties that existed, such as model simplification, observed data errors and lack of agricultural management data. The monthly NashSutcliffe coefficients at the watershed outlet ranged from 0.48 to 0.82, indicating that the model was able to successfully predict streamflow and agricultural pollutant transport after calibration. Predicted sediment loads were highly correlated to streamflow, whereas nitrate, chlorpyrifos and diazinon were moderately correlated to streamflow. This indicates that timing of agricultural management operations plays a role in agricultural pollutant runoff. Best management practices, such as pesticide use limits during wet seasons, could improve water quality in the Sacramento River watershed. The calibrated model establishes a modelling framework for further studies of hydrology, water quality and ecosystem protection in the study area. Copyright (C) 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Keywords: California, SWAT, agricultural runoff, water quality, calibration,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 071LF

416. Ficklin, Darren L.; Luo, Yuzhou; Luedeling, Eike; Gatzke, Sarah E., and Zhang, Minghua. Sensitivity of agricultural runoff loads to rising levels of CO2 and climate change in the San Joaquin Valley watershed of California. 2010 Jan; 158, (1): 223-234.


Rec #: 4000
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to assess the impact of climate change on sediment, nitrate, phosphorus and pesticide (diazinon and chlorpyrifos) runoff in the San Joaquin watershed in California. This study used modeling techniques that include variations of CO2, temperature, and precipitation to quantify these responses. Precipitation had a greater impact on agricultural runoff compared to changes in either CO2 concentration or temperature. Increase of precipitation by -_10% and -_20% generally changed agricultural runoff proportionally. Solely increasing CO2 concentration resulted in an increase in nitrate, phosphorus, and chlorpyrifos yield by 4.2, 7.8, and 6.4%, respectively, and a decrease in sediment and diazinon yield by 6.3 and 5.3%, respectively, in comparison to the present-day reference scenario. Only increasing temperature reduced yields of all agricultural runoff components. The results suggest that agricultural runoff in the San Joaquin watershed is sensitive to precipitation, temperature, and CO2 concentration changes. Watershed modeling/ Climate change/ Agricultural pollution/ Pesticides/ California/ SWAT

417. Ficklin, Darren L. and Zhang, Minghua. Modeling the Impacts of Climate Change on Hydrology and Agricultural Pollutant Runoff in California's Central Valley. 2010: (UMI# 3444013 ).


Rec #: 51729
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Quantifying the hydrologic and agricultural pollutant runoff response to an increased atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate change is critical for proper management of water resources within agricultural systems. This research takes this challenge by simulating the effects of climate change on the hydrologic cycle and agricultural pollutant transport in the Central Valley of California using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) water quality model and the HYDRUS soil water transport model. Specifically, changes in hydrology (streamflow, surface runoff, groundwater recharge, evapotranspiration, and irrigation water use) and agricultural pollutant runoff (sediment, nitrate, phosphorus, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon) were assessed. For the first three studies, hydrological responses were modeled in the San Joaquin River watershed using variations of atmospheric CO 2 (550 and 970 ppm), temperature (+1.1 and +6.4°C), and precipitation (0%, ±10%, and ±20%) based on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projections. The fourth study used a calibration and an uncertainty analysis technique for the calibration of the Sacramento River watershed. This study confirmed that SWAT was able to capture the large amount of uncertainty within the Sacramento River watershed and successfully simulate streamflow, sediment, nitrate, chlorpyrifos and diazinon loads. The final study uses a novel stochastic climate change analysis technique to bracket the 95% confidence interval of potential climate changes. For all studies, increases in precipitation generally changed the hydrological cycle and agricultural runoff proportionally, where increases in precipitation resulted in increases in surface runoff and thus agricultural runoff and vice-versa. Also, for all studies, increasing temperature caused a temporal shift in plant growth patterns and redistributed evapotranspiration and irrigation water demand earlier in the year. This lead to an increase in streamflow during the summer months compared to the present-day climate due to decreased irrigation demand. Increasing CO 2 concentration to 970 ppm and temperature by 6.4°C in the San Joaquin River watershed caused watershed-wide average evapotranspiration, averaged over 50 simulated years, to decrease by 37.5%, resulting in increases of water yield by 36.5% and stream flow by 23.5% compared to the present-day climate. Solely increasing CO 2 concentration in the San Joaquin River watershed resulted in an increase in nitrate, phosphorus, and chlorpyrifos yield by 4.2, 7.8, and 6.4%, respectively, and a decrease in sediment and diazinon yield by 6.3 and 5.3%, respectively, in comparison to the presentday reference scenario. Only increasing temperature reduced yields of all agricultural runoff components. Elevating atmospheric CO 2 concentrations generally decreased groundwater recharge under almonds, alfalfa, and tomatoes in the San Joaquin Valley due to decreased evapotranspiration resulting in decreased irrigation water use. Increasing average daily temperature by 1.1 and 6.4°C and atmospheric CO 2 concentration to 550 and 970 ppm led to a decrease in cumulative groundwater recharge for most scenarios. For the final study, 95% confidence interval (CI) results from stochastic climate change simulations indicate that streamflow (3% for the upper CI limit, 9.5% for the lower CI limit) and sediment runoff (20% for the upper CI limit, 26% for the lower CI limit) in the Sacramento River watershed is more likely to decrease under climate changes compared to present-day, while the increase and decrease for nitrate runoff was found to be equal (13% for the upper CI limit, 13% for the lower CI limit). For the San Joaquin River watershed, streamflow slightly decreased under climate change (27% for the upper CI limit, 28% for the lower CI limit), while sediment (73% for the upper CI limit, 49% for the lower CI limit) and nitrate (28% for the upper CI limit, 26% for the lower CI limit) increased compared to present-day climate. Comparisons of watershed sensitivities indicate that San Joaquin River watershed is more sensitive to climate changes than the Sacramento River watershed largely due to differences in land use and soil properties. This research improves the understanding between climate change and hydrology and agricultural pollutant runoff within the Central Valley of California. Theses climate change analyses may be used by water resource managers to evaluate the potential effects of climate change.
Start Page: 233
ISSN/ISBN: 9781124508566
Keywords: California
Keywords: 0388:Hydrologic sciences
Keywords: Climate change
Keywords: 0404:Climate Change
Keywords: 0595:Water Resource Management
Keywords: Watersheds
Keywords: Agricultural runoff
Keywords: Earth sciences
53026371
9781124508566
3444013
2297697841
0388: Hydrologic sciences
Climate change
0595: Water Resource Management
66569
Watersheds
n/a
English
Ficklin, Darren L.
857919212
2011-03-24
California
Copyright ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing 2010
2010
0404: Climate Change
Earth sciences
Agricultural runoff English

418. Fiedler, H.; Herrmann, G.; Schramm, K. W., and Hutzinger, O. Application of QSARs to Predict Potential Aquatic Toxicities of Organochlorine Pesticides. 1990; 26, (1-4): 157-160.


Rec #: 780
Keywords: MODELING,NO SPECIES,REFS CHECKED
Call Number: NO MODELING (24D,24DXY,ATZ,CAP,CLP,CPY,CTN,Captan,DCF,DDVP,DU,ES,FNV,FRM,IPD,MCPB,MTL,PCP,PMR,PPN,TBC,TBZ), NO REFS CHECKED (24D,24DXY,ATZ,CAP,CLP,CPY,CTN,Captan,DCF,DDVP,DU,ES,FNV,FRM,IPD,MCPB,MTL,PCP,PMR,PPN,TBC,TBZ), NO SPECIES (24D,24DXY,ATZ,CAP,CLP,CPY,CTN,Captan,DCF,DDVP,DU,ES,FNV,FRM,IPD,MCPB,MTL,PCP,PMR,PPN,TBC,TBZ)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: 24D,24DB,24DXY,AND,ATZ,CAP,CHD,CLP,CPY,CTN,Captan,Cl,DCF,DDT,DDVP,DLD,DU,EN,ES,FNV,FRM,HCCH,HPT,IPD,MCPA,MCPB,MTL,MTZ,MXC,PCH,PCP,PMR,PPCP,PPN,TBC,TBZ

419. Fieten, K. B.; Kromhout, H.; Heederik, D., and de Joode, B. V. Pesticide Exposure and Respiratory Health of Indigenous Women in Costa Rica. 2009; 169, (12): 1500-1506.


Rec #: 60109
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2007 to evaluate the relation between pesticide exposure and respiratory health in a population of indigenous women in Costa Rica. Exposed women (n = 69) all worked at plantain plantations. Unexposed women (n = 58) worked at organic banana plantations or other locations without pesticide exposure. Study participants were interviewed using questionnaires to estimate exposure and presence of respiratory symptoms. Spirometry tests were conducted to obtain forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Among the exposed, prevalence of wheeze was 20% and of shortness of breath was 36% versus 9% and 26%, respectively, for the unexposed. Prevalence of chronic cough, asthma, and atopic symptoms was similar for exposed and unexposed women. Among nonsmokers (n = 105), reported exposures to the organophosphate insecticides chlorpyrifos (n = 25) and terbufos (n = 38) were strongly associated with wheeze (odd ratio = 6.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.6, 28.0; odds ratio = 5.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 25.6, respectively). For both insecticides, a statistically significant exposure-effect association was found. Multiple organophosphate exposure was common; 81% of exposed women were exposed to both chlorpyrifos and terbufos. Consequently, their effects could not be separated. All findings were based on questionnaire data. No relation between pesticide exposure and ventilatory lung function was found.
Keywords: Costa Rica, occupational exposure, pesticides, respiratory function
ISI Document Delivery No.: 457SN

420. Filbert, E. L.; Nguyen, A.; Markiewicz, M. A.; Fowlkes, B. J.; Huang, Y. H., and Shaw, A. S. Kinase Suppressor of Ras 1 Is Required for Full Erk Activation in Thymocytes but Not for Thymocyte Selection.


Rec #: 50419
Keywords: NO TOXICANT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: The scaffold protein kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) is critical for efficient activation of ERK in a number of cell types. Consistent with this, we observed a defect in ERK activation in thymocytes that lack KSR1. Interestingly, we found that the defect was much greater after PMA stimulation than by CD3 activation. Since ERK activation is believed to be important for thymocyte development, we analyzed thymocyte selection in KSR1-deficient (KSR1(-/-) ) mice. We found that positive selection in two different TCR transgenic models, HY and AND, was normal. On the other hand, negative selection in the HY model was slightly impaired in KSR1(-/-) mice. However, a defect in negative selection was not apparent in the AND TCR model system or in an endogenous superantigen-mediated model of negative selection. These results suggest that, despite a requirement for KSR1 for full ERK activation in thymocytes, full and efficient ERK activation is not essential for the majority of thymocyte selection events.
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: Antigens, CD3/genetics/immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Carcinogens/pharmacology
MESH HEADINGS: Enzyme Activation/drug effects/genetics/immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/genetics/*immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Mice
MESH HEADINGS: Mice, Knockout
MESH HEADINGS: *Models, Immunological
MESH HEADINGS: Protein Kinases/genetics/*immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate/pharmacology
MESH HEADINGS: Thymus Gland/cytology/*immunology/metabolism eng

421. Fimmel, S. and Zouboulis, C. C. Comorbidities of Hidradenitis Suppurativa (Acne Inversa).


Rec #: 50389
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: ABSTRACT: Comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa (acne inversa) were reviewed by extracting original and review publications included in MEDLINE, EMBASE and COCHRANE libraries using the terms "hidradenitis," "Verneuil" and "acne inversa." Follicular occlusion disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases, especially Crohn disease, spondylarthropathy, other hyperergic diseases, genetic keratin disorders associated with follicular occlusion and squamous cell carcinoma were the most common hidradenitis suppurativa comorbid diseases. A first classification of these major comorbidities and their possible genetic background reveals a list of chromosome loci and genes, which could be hidradenitis suppurativa candidates. Most of these diseases belong to the group of autoinflammatory disorders, where th17 cell cytokines seem to play a central role. eng

422. Fink, R.; Beavers, J. B., and Brown, R. Final Report: Eleven-Day Toxicant 1 X LC50, with Five-day Half-life, Decreasing Concentrations- Mallard Ducks: Chlorpyrifos. 1978.


Rec #: 810
Keywords: NO SOURCE
Call Number: NO SOURCE (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

423. ---. Final Report: Eleven-Day Toxicant 2 X LC50, with Five-Day Half-life, Decreasing Concentrations- Mallard Duck: Chlorpyrifos. 1978.


Rec #: 820
Keywords: NO SOURCE
Call Number: NO SOURCE (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

424. ---. Final Report: Eleven-day Toxicant Dietary 2 X LC50 Option with Untreated Feed--Mallard Duck: Chlorpyrifos. 1978.


Rec #: 790
Keywords: NO SOURCE
Call Number: NO SOURCE (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

425. ---. Final Report: Elevenday Toxicant Dietary LC50-Mallard Duck: Chlorpyrifos. 1978.


Rec #: 800
Keywords: NO SOURCE
Call Number: NO SOURCE (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

426. Finlay-Schultz, J.; Canastar, A.; Short, M.; El Gazzar, M.; Coughlan, C., and Leonard, S. Transcriptional Repression of the Α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunit Gene (Chrna7) by Activating Protein-2Α (Ap-2Α).


Rec #: 49909
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: The CHRNA7 gene, which encodes the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7*nAChR), has been implicated as a candidate gene in schizophrenia. Expression of the α7*nAChR mRNA and protein are reduced in multiple regions of post-mortem brain from patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Transcriptional regulation may therefore be an important mechanism for the regulation of this gene. A 230-bp proximal promoter fragment, necessary for transcription in cultured neuroblastoma cells, was used to study a putative AP-2α binding site. Mutation of the site indicates that AP-2α plays a negative role in regulating CHRNA7 transcription. This was confirmed through knockdown and overexpression of AP-2α. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) identified positive DNA-protein interaction at this same site, and supershift assays indicate that the complex includes AP-2α. The interaction was confirmed in cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). DNA methylation was discovered as an anomalous mechanism for CHRNA7 regulation in one cell line. These studies suggest a role for AP-2α regulation of CHRNA7 mRNA expression in multiple tissues during development.
MESH HEADINGS: Cell Line, Tumor
MESH HEADINGS: DNA Methylation
MESH HEADINGS: *Gene Expression Regulation
MESH HEADINGS: Genetic Vectors
MESH HEADINGS: HeLa Cells
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Mutagenesis, Site-Directed
MESH HEADINGS: Mutation
MESH HEADINGS: Promoter Regions, Genetic
MESH HEADINGS: RNA, Messenger/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Receptors, Nicotinic/*biosynthesis/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Schizophrenia/*genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Transcription Factor AP-2/*metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Transcription, Genetic eng

427. Fishman, M. J. and Erdmann, D. E. Water Analysis. Analytical Chemisty Review//: 1975; 47, (5): 334-361.


Rec #: 2080
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Call Number: NO CHEM METHODS (ATZ,Ag,As,CBNDO,CN,CPY,Cr,Cr element,Cu,ES,LQN,NH3,SLCD,TCF,Zn,Zn element)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: AMTR,ATZ,Ag,Al,As,BORON,CBNDO,CN,CPY,Cl2,Cr,Cu,DDE,DDT,ES,LQN,NH3,NO3,SLCD,SULF,TCF,Zn

428. Flaskos, J; Nikolaidis, E; Harris, W; Sachana, M; Hargreaves, a J, and Flaskos, J. Effects of Sub-Lethal Neurite Outgrowth Inhibitory Concentrations of Chlorpyrifos Oxon on Cytoskeletal Proteins and Acetylcholinesterase in Differentiating N2a Cells. 2011 Nov 1; 256, (3): 330-336.


Rec #: 39329
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 mu M) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 mu M) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH.
Keywords: Neurofilaments
Keywords: Cytoskeleton
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Differentiation
Keywords: Phosphorylation
Keywords: Acetylcholinesterase
Keywords: Neuroblastoma cells
Keywords: Axonogenesis
Keywords: Immunofluorescence
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Diazinon
Keywords: Toxicology Abstracts
Date revised - 2011-12-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 330-336
ProQuest ID - 911153076
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Neurofilaments; Cytoskeleton; Chlorpyrifos; Differentiation; Phosphorylation; Acetylcholinesterase; Neuroblastoma cells; Axonogenesis; Immunofluorescence; Diazinon
Last updated - 2012-03-29
British nursing index edition - Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology [Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.]. Vol. 256, no. 3, pp. 330-336. 1 Nov 2011.
Corporate institution author - Flaskos, J; Nikolaidis, E; Harris, W; Sachana, M; Hargreaves, A J
DOI - 2ff6dd08-d60c-477d-b530csamfg201; 15964957; 0041-008X English

429. Flaskos, John and Flaskos, John. The Developmental Neurotoxicity of Organophosphorus Insecticides: a Direct Role for the Oxon Metabolites. 2012 Feb 25; 209, (1): 86-93.


Rec #: 42869
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Several extensively used organophosphorus ester (OP) insecticides are phosphorothionates. The oxon metabolites of phosphorothionates have long been known to be responsible for the acute cholinergic neurotoxicity associated with OP poisoning. In addition, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest that the oxon metabolites may also be directly responsible for the particular neurotoxicity that phosphorothionate insecticides, and especially chlorpyrifos (CP) and diazinon (DZ), are known to inflict on the developing organism. In vitro data reveal that the oxons, which are present at increased levels in the developing brain, have the ability to directly disrupt, at toxicologically relevant doses, separately a number of neurodevelopmental processes, including those of neuronal proliferation, neuronal differentiation, gliogenesis and apoptosis. In most cases, the effects of the oxons are very potent. Inhibition of neuronal and glial cell differentiation by the oxons in particular is up to 1000-times stronger than that caused by their parent phosphorothionates. The neurodevelopmental toxicity of the oxons is not related to the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but may be due to direct oxon interference with the morphogenic activity that AChE normally shows during neurodevelopment. Other possible direct targets of the oxons include neurodevelopmentally important cell signaling molecules and cytoskeletal proteins which have been found to be affected by the oxons and to which covalent binding of the oxons has been recently shown. Future studies should aim at confirming the developmental neurotoxic capacity of the oxons under in vivo conditions and they must also be extended to include OP parent insecticides with a PO moiety.
Keywords: Environment Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Pharmacy And Pharmacology
Keywords: Apoptosis
Keywords: Data processing
Keywords: Acetylcholinesterase
Keywords: Glial cells
Keywords: Brain
Keywords: Poisoning
Keywords: Metabolites
Keywords: Toxicity
Keywords: Esters
Keywords: ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Cytoskeleton
Keywords: Differentiation
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: Neurotoxicity
Keywords: Proteins
Keywords: Enzymatic activity
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Diazinon
Keywords: Gliogenesis
Date revised - 2012-03-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 86-93
ProQuest ID - 919296020
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Apoptosis; Data processing; Acetylcholinesterase; Glial cells; Brain; Poisoning; Metabolites; Esters; Chlorpyrifos; Cytoskeleton; Differentiation; Insecticides; Neurotoxicity; Enzymatic activity; Diazinon; Gliogenesis; Proteins; Toxicity
Last updated - 2012-03-22
Corporate institution author - Flaskos, John
DOI - OB-0b9ae86d-829e-4210-bbc6csamfg201; 16208962; 0378-4274 English

430. Fortenberry, Gamola Z.; Hu, Howard; Turyk, Mary; Barr, Dana Boyd, and Meeker, John D. Association between urinary 3, 5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, a metabolite of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl, and serum T4 and TSH in NHANES 1999Çô2002. 2012 May 1-; 424, (0): 351-355.


Rec #: 1950
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Thyroid hormones are vital to a host of human physiological functions in both children and adults. Exposures to chemicals, including chlorpyrifos, have been found to modify thyroid signaling at environmentally relevant levels in animal studies. The aim of this study was to examine circulating T4 and TSH levels in relation to urinary concentrations of 3, 5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPY), a metabolite of the organophosphorus insecticides chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl, using data from individuals 12 years and older from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). NHANES datasets from 1999 to 2000 and 2001Çô2002 were combined, and individuals with thyroid disease, those taking thyroid medications, and pregnant women were excluded (N = 3249). Multivariable linear regression models for relationships between log-transformed urinary TCPY and serum total T4 or log (TSH) were constructed adjusting for important covariates. Models were stratified by sex and a categorical age variable (12Çô18, 18Çô40, 40Çô60, and > 60 years). In male participants, an interquartile range (IQR) increase in urinary TCPY was associated with statistically significant increases in serum T4 of 3.8% (95th CI 0.75 to 7.0) among those 12Çô18 years of age and 3.5% (95th CI 0.13 to 7.0) in the 18Çô40 year age group, relative to median T4 levels using unweighted models. An IQR increase in TCPY was also associated with decreases in TSH of 10.7% (êÆ 18.7Çô2.05) among men 18Çô40 years old and 20.0% (95th CI êÆ 28.9 to êÆ 9.86) among men > 60 years old. Conversely, urinary TCPY was positively associated with TSH in females > 60 years of age. Further research to confirm these findings, elucidate mechanisms of action, and explore the clinical and public health significance of such alterations in thyroid hormones is needed. Biomarker/ Endocrine disruption/ Exposure/ Pesticides/ Human

431. Fortenberry, Gamola Z; Hu, Howard; Turyk, Mary; Barr, Dana Boyd; Meeker, John D, and Fortenberry, Gamola Z. Association Between Urinary 3, 5, 6-Trichloro-2-Pyridinol, a Metabolite of Chlorpyrifos and Chlorpyrifos-Methyl, and Serum T4 and Tsh in Nhanes 1999-2002. 2012 May 1; 424, 351-355.


Rec #: 38839
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Thyroid hormones are vital to a host of human physiological functions in both children and adults. Exposures to chemicals, including chlorpyrifos, have been found to modify thyroid signaling at environmentally relevant levels in animal studies. The aim of this study was to examine circulating T4 and TSH levels in relation to urinary concentrations of 3, 5, 6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPY), a metabolite of the organophosphorus insecticides chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl, using data from individuals 12years and older from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). NHANES datasets from 1999 to 2000 and 2001-2002 were combined, and individuals with thyroid disease, those taking thyroid medications, and pregnant women were excluded (N=3249). Multivariable linear regression models for relationships between log-transformed urinary TCPY and serum total T4 or log (TSH) were constructed adjusting for important covariates. Models were stratified by sex and a categorical age variable (12-18, 18-40, 40-60, and >60years). In male participants, an interquartile range (IQR) increase in urinary TCPY was associated with statistically significant increases in serum T4 of 3.8% (95th CI 0.75 to 7.0) among those 12-18years of age and 3.5% (95th CI 0.13 to 7.0) in the 18-40year age group, relative to median T4 levels using unweighted models. An IQR increase in TCPY was also associated with decreases in TSH of 10.7% (-18.7-2.05) among men 18-40years old and 20.0% (95th CI -28.9 to -9.86) among men >60years old. Conversely, urinary TCPY was positively associated with TSH in females >60years of age. Further research to confirm these findings, elucidate mechanisms of action, and explore the clinical and public health significance of such alterations in thyroid hormones is needed.
Keywords: Environmental Engineering Abstracts (EN); CSA / ASCE Civil Engineering Abstracts (CE)
Date revised - 2012-08-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 351-355
ProQuest ID - 1017976296
Last updated - 2012-08-07
British nursing index edition - Science of the Total Environment [Sci. Total Environ.]. Vol. 424, pp. 351-355. 1 May 2012.
Corporate institution author - Fortenberry, Gamola Z; Hu, Howard; Turyk, Mary; Barr, Dana Boyd; Meeker, John D
DOI - 2270cb05-b75f-446f-b397csamfg201; 16724760; 0048-9697 English

432. Fortes, C. Lupus erythematosus. Are residential insecticides exposure the missing link? 2010; 75, (6): 590-593.


Rec #: 60159
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Although the etiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains to be fully elucidated, it is now apparent that multiple genetic and environmental factors are at play. Because lupus has a strong female preponderance, several studies have examined the role of female hormones in disease etiology. Yet this knowledge has not helped to explain lupus etiology or to prevent it. Estrogens exist not only as natural or drug compounds, but also as environmental chemical contaminant and women are highly exposed to all of them. Estrogenic activity has been found in a number of pesticides including pyrethroids that are largely used in the household. Although there is only a small amount of published data examining a possible causal relationship between lupus and pesticides it can be hypothesized that pesticides, in particular insecticides, through their estrogenic activity and capacity to induce oxidative stress provoke autoimmune reaction influencing lupus development. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: RISK-FACTORS, CYTOKINE PRODUCTION, IN-VITRO, IMMUNOLOGICAL
ISI Document Delivery No.: 715VO

433. Fountain, Michelle T.; Harris, Adrian L.; Xu, Xiangming, and Cross, Jerry V. Timing and efficacy of insecticides for control of mussel scale, Lepidosaphes ulmi, on apple using predictive models. 2012 Jan; 31, (1): 58-66.


Rec #: 3610
Keywords: NO TOXICANT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: The timing and pattern of mussel scale (Lepidosaphes ulmi (L.)) crawler emergence was monitored in relation to air and bark-surface temperatures using sticky band traps around branches in apple orchards in Kent, UK in three successive years, 2007Çô2009. The emergence and migration of the crawlers lasted for over 4 weeks at a high level, much longer than had been previously reported. In all three years, there were clearly two peaks of emergence of the crawlers, possibly because there is a diapausing and non-diapausing form of the insect. A temperature sum model developed in the 1990s in The Netherlands using air temperatures predicted the peak emergence of crawlers to within 5Çô16 days; however, the model was less accurate when tree bark temperatures for the north or south of the tree were used. We have developed two models to predict the emergence of the crawlers by revising the original Dutch model. The observed emergence period (5Çô95%) was longer than the predicted in all three years but the two revised models performed better than the original Dutch model. Apple/ Mussel scale/ Lepidosaphes ulmi/ Winter oil/ Insecticide

434. Fox, Garey A.; Mu+_oz-Carpena, Rafael, and Sabbagh, George J. Influence of flow concentration on parameter importance and prediction uncertainty of pesticide trapping by vegetative filter strips. 2010 Apr 15-; 384, (1Çô2): 164-173.


Rec #: 5300
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Summary Concentrated flow/ Pesticides/ Sensitivity analysis/ Uncertainty analysis/ Uniform flow/ Vegetative filter strips

435. Fox, J. H.; Connor, T.; Stiles, M.; Kama, J.; Lu, Z.; Dorsey, K.; Lieberman, G.; Liebermann, G.; Sapp, E.; Cherny, R. A.; Banks, M.; Volitakis, I.; Difiglia, M.; Berezovska, O.; Bush, A. I., and Hersch, S. M. Cysteine Oxidation Within N-Terminal Mutant Huntingtin Promotes Oligomerization and Delays Clearance of Soluble Protein.


Rec #: 50209
Keywords: NO TOXICANT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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COMMENTS: Erratum in: J Biol Chem. 2011 Jul 29;286(30):27068: Liebermann, Gregory [corrected to Lieberman, Gregory]
ABSTRACT: Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expression of polyglutamine-expanded mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt). Most evidence indicates that soluble mhtt species, rather than insoluble aggregates, are the important mediators of HD pathogenesis. However, the differential roles of soluble monomeric and oligomeric mhtt species in HD and the mechanisms of oligomer formation are not yet understood. We have shown previously that copper interacts with and oxidizes the polyglutamine-containing N171 fragment of huntingtin. In this study we report that oxidation-dependent oligomers of huntingtin form spontaneously in cell and mouse HD models. Levels of these species are modulated by copper, hydrogen peroxide, and glutathione. Mutagenesis of all cysteine residues within N171 blocks the formation of these oligomers. In cells, levels of oligomerization-blocked mutant N171 were decreased compared with native N171. We further show that a subset of the oligomerization-blocked form of glutamine-expanded N171 huntingtin is rapidly depleted from the soluble pool compared with "native " mutant N171. Taken together, our data indicate that huntingtin is subject to specific oxidations that are involved in the formation of stable oligomers and that also delay removal from the soluble pool. These findings show that inhibiting formation of oxidation-dependent huntingtin oligomers, or promoting their dissolution, may have protective effects in HD by decreasing the burden of soluble mutant huntingtin.
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: COS Cells
MESH HEADINGS: Cercopithecus aethiops
MESH HEADINGS: Cysteine/genetics/*metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Disease Models, Animal
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Huntington Disease/genetics/*metabolism/pathology
MESH HEADINGS: Mice
MESH HEADINGS: *Mutation, Missense
MESH HEADINGS: Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics/*metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Nuclear Proteins/genetics/*metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Oxidation-Reduction
MESH HEADINGS: *Protein Multimerization
MESH HEADINGS: Protein Structure, Tertiary
MESH HEADINGS: Solubility eng

436. Foxenberg, Robert J; Ellison, Corie a; Knaak, James B; Ma, Changxing; Olson, James R, and Foxenberg, Robert J. Cytochrome P450-Specific Human Pbpk/Pd Models for the Organophosphorus Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos and Parathion. 2011 Jul 11; 285, (1-2): 57-66.


Rec #: 39609
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) remain a potential concern to human health because of their continuing use worldwide. Phosphororthioate OPs like chlorpyrifos and parathion are directly activated and detoxified by various cytochrome P450s (CYPs), with the primary CYPs involved being CYP2B6 and CYP2C19. The goal of the current study was to convert a previously reported human pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model for chlorpyrifos, that used chlorpyrifos metabolism parameters from rat liver, into a human CYP based/age-specific model using recombinant human CYP kinetic parameters (Vmax, Km), hepatic CYP content and plasma binding measurements to estimate new values for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibition and to use the model as a template for the development of a comparable parathion PBPK/PD model. The human CYP based/age-specific PBPK/PD models were used to simulate single oral exposures of adults (19 year old) and infants (1 year) to chlorpyrifos (10,000, 1000 and 100 mu g/kg) or parathion (100, 25 and 5 mu g/kg). Model simulations showed that there is an age dependency in the amount of blood cholinesterase inhibition observed, however additional age-dependent data are needed to further optimize age-specific human PBPK/PD modeling for these OP compounds. PBPK/PD model simulations estimated that a 4-fold increase or decrease in relative CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 content would produce a 9-22% inhibition in blood AChE activity following exposure of an adult to chlorpyrifos (1000 mu g/kg). Similar model simulation produced an 18-22% inhibition in blood AChE activity following exposure of an adult to parathion (25 mu g/kg). Individuals with greater CYP2B6 content and lower CYP2C19 content were predicted to be most sensitive to both OPs. Changes in hepatic CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 content had more of an influence on cholinesterase inhibition for exposures to chlorpyrifos than parathion, which agrees with previously reported literature that these CYPs are more reaction biased for desulfurization (activation) and dearylation (detoxification) of chlorpyrifos compared to parathion. The data presented here illustrate how PBPK/PD models with human enzyme-specific parameters can assist ongoing risk assessment efforts and aid in the identification of sensitive individuals and populations.
Keywords: Detoxification
Keywords: Risk assessment
Keywords: Age
Keywords: Acetylcholinesterase
Keywords: Cholinesterase
Keywords: Models
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Pharmacodynamics
Keywords: Pesticides (organophosphorus)
Keywords: Environment Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Data processing
Keywords: Pharmacy And Pharmacology
Keywords: desulfurization
Keywords: Simulation
Keywords: Pharmacokinetics
Keywords: ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety
Keywords: Blood levels
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Blood
Keywords: Cytochrome
Keywords: Kinetics
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Liver
Keywords: Cytochrome P450
Keywords: Metabolism
Keywords: Infants
Keywords: Parathion
Date revised - 2011-10-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 57-66
ProQuest ID - 886209592
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Detoxification; Risk assessment; Pesticides (organophosphorus); Age; Data processing; Acetylcholinesterase; desulfurization; Cholinesterase; Pharmacokinetics; Models; Chlorpyrifos; Blood; Kinetics; Liver; Cytochrome P450; Metabolism; Pharmacodynamics; Parathion; Infants; Cytochrome; Pesticides; Simulation; Blood levels
Last updated - 2011-12-15
Corporate institution author - Foxenberg, Robert J; Ellison, Corie A; Knaak, James B; Ma, Changxing; Olson, James R
DOI - OB-ab54c480-adac-4618-816ecsaobj201; 14991206; 0300-483X English

437. Fragkiadaki, Persefoni; Germanakis, Ioannis; Zafeiropoulos, Alexandros; Kalogeraki, Aleka; Tsarouchas, Konstantinos; Tsitsimpikou, Christina ; Dolapsakis, George; Tsatsakis, Aristidis, and Kouretas, Demetrios. Histopathological findings, oxidative stress and ultrasound measurements in heart tissues after long term rabbits exposure to chlorpyrifos. 2012 Jun 17-; 211, Supplement, (0): S164-S165.


Rec #: 2650
Keywords: ABSTRACT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

438. Frank, R.; Braun, H. E.; Suda, P.; Ripley, B. D.; Clegg, B. S.; Beyaert, R. P., and Zilkey, B. F. Pesticide Residues and Metal Contents in Flue-Cured Tobacco and Tobacco Soils of Southern Ontario, Canada 1980-85. SOIL; 1987; 31, 40-45.


Rec #: 830
Keywords: NO DURATION,SURVEY
Call Number: NO DURATION (ACP,CPY,CYP,DM,DZ,ES,MLN,MLX,MOM,OXD,PMR,TCF), NO SURVEY (ACP,CPY,CYP,DM,DZ,ES,MLN,MLX,MOM,OXD,PMR,TCF)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: ACP,CPY,CYP,DM,DZ,ES,MLN,MLX,MOM,OXD,PIM,PMR,TCF

439. Freire, Carmen and Koifman, Sergio. Pesticide exposure and Parkinson's disease: Epidemiological evidence of association. 2012 Oct; 33, (5): 947-971.


Rec #: 4090
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: It has been suggested that exposure to pesticides might be involved in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted an updated systematic review of the epidemiologic literature over the past decade on the relationship between pesticide exposure and PD, using the MEDLINE database. Despite methodological differences, a significantly increased PD risk was observed in 13 out of 23 caseÇôcontrol studies that considered overall exposure to pesticides (risk estimates of 1.1Çô2.4) and in 10 out of 12 studies using other research designs (risk estimates of 2 or higher). Various studies found stronger associations in genetically susceptible individuals. Among a growing number of studies on the effects of exposure to specific pesticides (n = 20), an increased PD risk has been associated with insecticides, especially chlorpyrifos and organochlorines, in six studies (odds ratios of 1.8Çô4.4), and with the herbicide paraquat, the fungicide maneb or the combination of both. Findings considerably strengthen the evidence that exposure to pesticides in well water may contribute to PD, whereas studies of farming and rural residence found inconsistent or little association with the disease. Taken together, this comprehensive set of results suggests that the hypothesis of an association between pesticide exposure and PD cannot be ruled out. However, inadequate data on consistent responses to exposure hinder the establishment of a causal relationship with PD. Given the extensive worldwide use of many pesticides, further studies are warranted in larger populations that include detailed quantitative data on exposure and determination of genetic polymorphisms. Pesticides/ Parkinson's disease/ Organochlorines/ Organophosphates/ CaseÇôcontrol/ Cohort studies/ Incidence

440. Freire, Carmen and Koifman, Sergio. Pesticides, depression and suicide: A systematic review of the epidemiological evidence. (0).


Rec #: 3780
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: It has been suggested that high exposure to pesticides, including poisoning, experienced by agriculture workers and rural residents may result in an elevated risk of psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior. Epidemiological data supporting this hypothesis are very limited. An updated systematic review was conducted in epidemiologic literature on the relationship of pesticide exposure with depression and suicide published over the last 15 years by using MEDLINE database. A total of 11 studies on depression and 14 studies on suicide met inclusion criteria. Depression or other psychiatric disorders have shown increased risks associated with previous pesticide poisoning in 5 studies, with statistically significant odds ratios (OR) ranging from 2.08 to 5.95. Lower risk estimates have been found for chronic pesticide exposure. Among studies on suicide, 4 reports found increased suicide rates in areas with intensive pesticide use (OR between 1.60 and 2.61) compared to areas with lower pesticide use. Occupation in agriculture has shown a significant association with higher suicide risk than other occupational groups in 4 studies (OR between 1.30 and 4.13), but not in one recent report. Regarding specific pesticides, lifetime use of chlorpyrifos was related with increased suicide mortality (OR = 2.37) in one study. Scientific evidence of association between pesticide exposure and either depression or suicide has been shown in some populations, in studies using varying epidemiological approaches, but is still very limited and inconclusive. Review of the literature warrants further research to explore such relationships, in particular prospective studies among large samples of high- and low-dose-exposed workers, using detailed exposure assessments, and evaluating other potential sources of psychological stress. Pesticides/ Organophosphates/ Psychiatric disorders/ Depression/ Suicide

441. Frenich, A. G.; Vidal, J. L. M.; Moreno, J. L. F., and Romero-Gonzalez, R. Compensation for matrix effects in gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a single point standard addition. 2009; 1216, (23): 4798-4808.


Rec #: 60259
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: One of the major problems in quantitative analysis of pesticide residues in food samples by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) is the enhancement or the suppression, of the target analyte signals in matrix extracts. Potentially positive samples, which had previously been identified by a rapid screening method, were quantified using standard addition to compensate matrix effects. As example we performed a systematic study on the application of the standard addition calibration (SAC) method for the determination of 12 pesticides (acephate, bromopropylate, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, diazinon, etrimfos, heptenophos, iprodione, methamidophos, procymidone, tetradifon, and triadimefon) in two matrices (cucumber and orange) in the range of initial concentrations of 10-200 mu g kg(-1). The influence of some factors, such as the minimum number of standard additions used (single, two, three or four points calibration), as well as the known amount of analyte added to the sample, is evaluated in order to obtain reliable results. Accurate quantification is achieved when a single point SAC at 200 mu g kg(-1) was used. obtaining for all the cases recoveries between 70 and 120%. The proposed analytical approach only needs two injections per sample (blank and spiked extracted sample) to determine the final concentration of pesticide in positive samples. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Standard addition calibration, Matrix effect, Pesticide, Gas
ISI Document Delivery No.: 451DB

442. Frishman, Austin M. A Chemical Historical Review of German Cockroach Management. 2010 Jun; 78, (6): 35.


Rec #: 44109
Keywords: REVIEW
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Frishman identifies several pesticides used to control cockroaches. He argues that prior to World War Il, pest management professionals (PMPs) relied heavily on sodium fluoride powder or a combing with pyrethrin. After World War II, however, chlordane and spraying took the industry by storm. Within five years of chlordane's introduction, some cockroaches were documented as being resistant to such treatments. By the 1950s, diazinon became the preferred material of many PMPs. Prior to the steep increase of petroleum, some oil-based materials also were used. When cockroaches developed resistance to diazinon in the 1960s, another organophosphate, chlorpyrifos (Dursban), took its place. About the same time, carbamates in the form of Baygon and Ficam became favorites. In each instance, the chemical was mixed in a compressed sprayer and applied to surfaces.
Keywords: Agriculture--Crop Production And Soil
Copyright - Copyright Questex Media Group Jun 2010
Language of summary - English
ProQuest ID - 609240658
Last updated - 2010-07-18
Place of publication - Cleveland
Corporate institution author - Frishman, Austin M
DOI - 2079897381; 53327421; 36056; PECL; INODPECL0000396670 English

443. Fu, Z. F.; Shao, G. C.; Wang, J.; Lu, D. L.; Wang, W. J., and Lin, Y. H. Microfabricated Renewable Beads-Trapping/Releasing Flow Cell for Rapid Antigen-Antibody Reaction in Chemiluminescent Immunoassay. 2011; 83, (7): 2685-2690.


Rec #: 60269
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A renewable flow cell integrating a microstructured pillar-array filter and a pneumatic microvalve was microfabricated to trap and release beads. A bead-based immunoassay using this device was also developed. This microfabricated device consists of a microfluidic channel connecting to a beads chamber in which the pillar-array filter is built. Underneath the filter, there is a pneumatic microvalve built across the chamber. Such a device can trap and release beads in the chamber by "closing" or "opening" the microvalve. On the basis of the pneumatic microvalve, the device can trap beads in the chamber before performing an assay and release the used beads after the assay. Therefore, this microfabricated device is suitable for "renewable surface analysis". A model analyte, 3,5,6-trichloropyridinol (TCP), was chosen to demonstrate the analytical performance of the device. The entire fluidic assay process, including beads trapping, immuno binding, beads washing, beads releasing, and chemiluminesence signal collection, could be completed in 10 min. The immunoassay of TCP using this microfabricated device showed a linear range of 0.20-70 ng/mL with a limit of detection of 0.080 ng/mL. The device was successfully used to detect TCP spiked in human plasma at the concentration range of 1.0-50 ng/mL, with an analytical recovery of 81-110%. The results demonstrated that this device can provide a rapid, sensitive, reusable, low-cost, and automatic tool for detecting various biomarkers in biological fluids.
Keywords: MICROFLUIDIC IMMUNOSENSOR, INJECTION-ANALYSIS, ASSAY, CHIP,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 741TM

444. Fuentes, E. ; Baez, M. E., and Diaz, J. Survey of organophosphorus pesticide residues in virgin olive oils produced in Chile. 2010; 3, (2): 101-107.


Rec #: 60279
Keywords: FOOD
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Dimethoate, diazinon, parathion methyl, pirimiphos methyl, malathion, fenthion, chlorpyriphos, methidathion and azinphos methyl were determined in 71 olive oil samples produced in Chile from different varieties of olives (arbequina, frantoio, picual, lechino and blend) at three different harvest periods (2007, 2008 and 2009). The target pesticides were determined using a validated analytical method based on microwave-assisted liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction with subsequent GC-FPD detection and GC-MS/MS for confirmation purposes. In 79% of the samples, five of the nine pesticides tested were detected with a frequency of one pesticide per sample. The highest detection rates were observed for the residues of chlorpyriphos and diazinon. The average concentration of chlorpyriphos, diazinon, azinphos methyl and methidathion were 0.084, 0.057, 0.024 and 0.010 mu g g-1, respectively. Higher contents of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) were found in regions where intensive agriculture is practiced. However, the levels of OPPs were reassuringly low and indicate that olive oil produced and exported from Chile does not currently represent any risk for consumers.
Keywords: organophosphorus pesticides, olive oil, monitoring, microwave-assisted
ISI Document Delivery No.: 610ID

445. Fuentes, E. ; Baez, M. E., and Quinones, A. Suitability of microwave-assisted extraction coupled with solid-phase extraction for organophosphorus pesticide determination in olive oil. 2008; 1207, (1-2): 38-45.


Rec #: 60289
Keywords: FOOD
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A systematic study of the microwave-assisted extraction coupled to solid-phase extraction of nine organophosphorus pesticides (dimethoate, diazinon, pirimiphos methyl, parathion methyl, malathion, fenthion, chlorpyriphos, methidathion and azinphos methyl) from olive oil is described. The method is based on microwave-assisted liquid-liquid extraction with partition of organophosphorus pesticides between an acetonitrile-dichloromethane mixture and oil. Cleanup of extracts was performed with ENVI-Carb solid-phase extraction cartridge using dichloromethane as the elution solvent. The determination of pesticides in the final extracts was carried out by gas chromatography-flame photometric detection and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, using a triple quadrupole mass analyzer, for confirmative purposes. The study and optimization of the method was achieved through experimental design where recovery of compounds using acetonitrile for partition ranged from 62 to 99%. By adding dichloromethane to the extracting solution, the recoveries of more hydrophobic compounds were significantly increased. Under optimized conditions recoveries of pesticides from oil were equal to or higher than 73%, except for fenthion and chlorpyriphos at concentrations higher than 0.06 mu g g(-1) and diazinon at 0.03 mu g g-1, with RSDs equal to or lower than 11% and quantification limits ranging from 0.007 to 0.020 mu g g(-1). The proposed method was applied to residue determination of the selected pesticides in commercial olive and avocado oil produced in Chile. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Organophosphorus pesticides, Olive oil, Microwave-assisted extraction,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 365HX

446. Fujikawa, M.; Nakao, K.; Shimizu, R., and Akamatsu, M. QSAR study on permeability of hydrophobic compounds with artificial membranes. 2007; 15, (11): 3756-3767.


Rec #: 60299
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: We previously reported a classical quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) equation for permeability coefficients (P(app-pampa)) by parallel artificial membrane permeation assay (PAMPA) of structurally diverse compounds with simple physicochemical parameters, hydrophobicity at a particular pH (log P(oct) and vertical bar pK(a) - pH vertical bar), hydrogen-accepting ability (SA(HA)), and hydrogen-donating ability (SA(HD)); however, desipramine, imipramine, and testosterone, which have high log P(oct) values, were excluded from the derived QSAR equation because their measured P(app-pampa) values were lower than calculated. In this study, for further investigation of PAMPA permeability of hydrophobic compounds, we experimentally measured the P(app-pampa) of more compounds with high hydrophobicity, including several pesticides, and compared the measured P(app-pampa) values with those calculated from the QSAR equation. As a result, compounds having a calculated log P(app-pampa) > -4.5 showed lower measured log P(app-pampa) than calculated because of the barrier of the unstirred water layer and the membrane retention of hydrophobic compounds. The bilinear QSAR model explained the PAMPA permeability of the whole dataset of compounds, whether hydrophilic or hydrophobic, with the same parameters as the equation in the previous study. In addition, PAMPA permeability coefficients correlated well with Caco-2 cell permeability coefficients. Since Caco-2 cell permeability is effective for the evaluation of human oral absorption of compounds, the proposed bilinear model for PAMPA permeability could be useful for not only effective screening for several drug candidates but also the risk assessment of chemicals and agrochemicals absorbed by humans. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: PAMPA, unstirred water layer, membrane retention, structure-property
ISI Document Delivery No.: 170FV

447. Fulton, M. H. and Key, P. B. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition in Estuarine Fish and Invertebrates as an Indicator of Organophosphorus Insecticide Exposure and Effects. 2001; 20, (1): 37-45.


Rec #: 80
Keywords: REVIEW
Call Number: NO REVIEW (AZ,CBF,CBL,CPY,DDVP,DMT,DZ,FNT,MLN,MP,Naled,PRT,TBF)
Notes: EcoReference No.: 152621
Chemical of Concern: AZ,CBF,CBL,CPY,DDVP,DMT,DZ,EPRN,FNT,MLN,MP,Naled,PHSL,PPHD,PRN,PRT,TBF

448. Furlong, C. E.; Suzuki, S. M.; Stevens, R. C.; Marsillach, J.; Richter, R. J.; Jarvik, G. P.; Checkoway, H.; Samii, A.; Costa, L. G.; Griffith, A.; Roberts, J. W.; Yearout, D., and Zabetian, C. P. Human PON1, a biomarker of risk of disease and exposure. 2010; 187, (1-3): 355-361.


Rec #: 60339
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated serum enzyme that exhibits a broad substrate specificity. In addition to protecting against exposure to some organophosphorus (OP) pesticides by hydrolyzing their toxic oxon metabolites. PON1 is important in protecting against vascular disease by metabolizing oxidized lipids. Recently, PON1 has also been shown to play a role in inactivating the quorum sensing factor N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Native, untagged engineered recombinant human PON1 (rHuPON1) expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by conventional column chromatographic purification is stable, active, and capable of protecting PON1 knockout mice (PON1(-/-)) from exposure to high levels of the OP compound diazoxon. The bacterially derived rHuPON1 can be produced in large quantities and lacks the glycosylation of eukaryotic systems that can produce immunogenic complications when inappropriately glycosylated recombinant proteins are used as therapeutics. Previous studies have shown that the determination of PON1 status, which reveals both PON1(192) functional genotype and serum enzyme activity level, is required for a meaningful evaluation of PON1's role in risk of disease or exposure. We have developed a new two-substrate assay/analysis protocol that provides PON1 status without use of toxic OP substrates, allowing for use of this protocol in non-specialized laboratories. Factors were also determined for inter-converting rates of hydrolysis of different substrates. PON1 status also plays an important role in revealing changes in HDL-associated PON1 activities in male patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Immunolocalization studies of PONs 1, 2 and 3 in nearly all mouse tissues suggest that the functions of PONs 1 and 3 extend beyond the plasma and the HDL particle. (C) 2010 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Keywords: Paraoxonase 1, Parkinson disease, Organophosphate, Therapy for OP
ISI Document Delivery No.: 641EW

449. Gaidukov, Leonid; Bar, Dganit; Yacobson, Shiri; Naftali, Esmira; Kaufman, Olga; Tabakman, Rinat; Tawfik, Dan S, and Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar. In Vivo Administration of Bl-3050: Highly Stable Engineered Pon1-Hdl Complexes. 2009; 9, 18.


Rec #: 45149
Keywords: NO TOXICANT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Serum paraoxonase (PON1) is a high density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated enzyme involved in organophosphate (OP) degradation and prevention of atherosclerosis. PON1 comprises a potential candidate for in vivo therapeutics, as an anti-atherogenic agent, and for detoxification of pesticides and nerve agents. Because human PON1 exhibits limited stability, engineered, recombinant PON1 (rePON1) variants that were designed for higher reactivity, solubility, stability, and bacterial expression, are candidates for treatment.
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