Appendix 2-5: Rejected ecotox bibliography for Chlorpyrifos



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frog tadpole tissue at 31 sites where Cascades frogs had disappeared and sites where Cascades frogs are still present across the Lassen and Klamath regions. Pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla) were tested and used as surrogates for residue concentrations in Cascades frogs. We analyzed a total of 79 tadpole samples for 73 semivolatile contaminants including pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The most frequently detected residue was endosulfan sulfate, followed by dacthal, chlorpyrifos, PCB 187, endosulfan II, trans-chlordane, and trans-nonachlor. Chorus frogs had similar residue concentrations as Cascades frogs for most but not all chemicals, indicating that chorus frogs can serve as a reasonable proxy for chemical concentrations in Cascades frogs. None of the contaminants in tissue or sediment had significantly higher concentrations at sites where Cascades frogs have disappeared than at sites where Cascades frogs are still present. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that the contaminants analyzed have contributed to the decline of Cascades frogs in northern California, although we were able to analyze only a handful of the over 300 pesticides currently used in the area. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2012; 31: 18951902. (c) 2012 SETAC
Keywords: Amphibian declines, Pesticides, Rana cascadae, Pseudacris regilla
ISI Document Delivery No.: 974ZL

292. Davidson, C. M.; Northrup, H.; King, T. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Townsend, I.; Tyerman, G. H., and Au, K. S. Genes in Glucose Metabolism and Association With Spina Bifida.


Rec #: 51579
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Mar;64(3):861-70 (medline /10053021)
COMMENTS: Cites: Nat Med. 1998 Dec;4(12):1421-4 (medline /9846581)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Oct;65(4):1208-10 (medline /10486344)
COMMENTS: Cites: Semin Reprod Endocrinol. 1999;17(2):153-65 (medline /10528366)
COMMENTS: Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Nov 11;341(20):1509-19 (medline /10559453)
COMMENTS: Cites: Diabetes. 1999 Dec;48(12):2454-62 (medline /10580436)
COMMENTS: Cites: Teratology. 2000 Mar;61(3):231-5 (medline /10661913)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Biol Chem. 2000 Dec 22;275(51):40252-7 (medline /10995754)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mech Dev. 2000 Dec;99(1-2):159-62 (medline /11091085)
COMMENTS: Cites: Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2001 Mar;12(2):78-82 (medline /11167126)
COMMENTS: Cites: Hum Genet. 2001 Jan;108(1):14-9 (medline /11214902)
COMMENTS: Cites: Genes Dev. 2001 Jun 1;15(11):1406-18 (medline /11390360)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell Biol. 2001 Sep;21(17):5899-912 (medline /11486029)
COMMENTS: Cites: Epidemiology. 2001 Nov;12(6):630-5 (medline /11679789)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Med Genet. 2001 Dec;38(12):863-7 (medline /11768390)
COMMENTS: Cites: Genes Dev. 2002 Mar 15;16(6):676-80 (medline /11914272)
COMMENTS: Cites: Endocrinology. 2002 May;143(5):1922-31 (medline /11956175)
COMMENTS: Cites: Science. 2002 Aug 9;297(5583):1007-13 (medline /12114529)
COMMENTS: Cites: Br J Nutr. 2003 Jan;89(1):3-9 (medline /12568659)
COMMENTS: Cites: Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2003 Jun;67(6):429-37 (medline /12962287)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell Biol. 2003 Oct;23(20):7315-28 (medline /14517300)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):972-8 (medline /14594784)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Dec 23;100(26):15613-8 (medline /14673082)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Dec;189(6):1713-9 (medline /14710103)
COMMENTS: Cites: Genes Dev. 2004 Jun 1;18(11):1241-50 (medline /15145827)
COMMENTS: Cites: Diabetes. 2004 Jun;53(6):1603-8 (medline /15161768)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell. 2004 Dec 3;16(5):819-30 (medline /15574336)
COMMENTS: Cites: Cell. 2004 Dec 17;119(6):831-45 (medline /15607979)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2005 Mar 8;102(10):3846-51 (medline /15731347)
COMMENTS: Cites: Mol Cell Biol. 2005 Aug;25(16):7323-32 (medline /16055740)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Hum Genet. 2006;51(2):85-91 (medline /16333525)
COMMENTS: Cites: Diabetologia. 2006 May;49(5):1027-38 (medline /16508779)
COMMENTS: Cites: Hum Mol Genet. 2006 Aug 15;15(16):2490-508 (medline /16825284)
COMMENTS: Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007 Aug;161(8):745-50 (medline /17679655)
COMMENTS: Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Oct;173(4):1036-41 (medline /7485290)
COMMENTS: Cites: Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1995 Apr 6;209(1):95-102 (medline /7726869)
COMMENTS: Cites: Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1994 Mar 30;199(3):1525-31 (medline /8147898)
COMMENTS: Cites: Endocrinology. 1994 Feb;134(2):869-78 (medline /8299581)
COMMENTS: Cites: JAMA. 1996 Apr 10;275(14):1093-6 (medline /8601928)
COMMENTS: Cites: Diabetes. 1997 Feb;46(2):313-6 (medline /9000710)
COMMENTS: Cites: Diabetes. 1997 Jul;46(7):1189-97 (medline /9200655)
COMMENTS: Cites: Endocrinology. 1997 Aug;138(8):3395-401 (medline /9231793)
COMMENTS: Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 May 11;96(10):5598-603 (medline /10318930)
ABSTRACT: The authors test single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in coding sequences of 12 candidate genes involved in glucose metabolism and obesity for associations with spina bifida. Genotyping was performed on 507 children with spina bifida and their parents plus anonymous control DNAs from Hispanic and Caucasian individuals. The transmission disequilibrium test was performed to test for genetic associations between transmission of alleles and spina bifida in the offspring (P < .05). A statistically significant association between Lys481 of HK1 (G allele), Arg109Lys of LEPR (G allele), and Pro196 of GLUT1 (A allele) was found ( P = .019, .039, and .040, respectively). Three SNPs on 3 genes involved with glucose metabolism and obesity may be associated with increased susceptibility to spina bifida.
MESH HEADINGS: Catalase/genetics
MESH HEADINGS: European Continental Ancestry Group/statistics &
MESH HEADINGS: numerical data
MESH HEADINGS: Female
MESH HEADINGS: Gene Expression Profiling
MESH HEADINGS: Genes, p53
MESH HEADINGS: Genetic Predisposition to Disease
MESH HEADINGS: Genotype
MESH HEADINGS: Glucose Metabolism Disorders/ethnology/*genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Glucose Transporter Type 1/*genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Hexokinase/*genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Hispanic Americans/statistics &
MESH HEADINGS: numerical data
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Leptin/genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Male
MESH HEADINGS: Obesity/ethnology/genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
MESH HEADINGS: Receptor, Insulin/genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Receptors, Leptin/*genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Spinal Dysraphism/ethnology/*genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Superoxide Dismutase/genetics eng

293. Davies, J; Roberts, D; Eyer, P; Buckley, N; Eddleston, M, and Davies, J. Hypotension in Severe Dimethoate Self-Poisoning. 2008 Nov; 46, (9): 880-884.


Rec #: 45419
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Introduction. Acute self-poisoning with the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide dimethoate has a human case fatality three-fold higher than poisoning with chlorpyrifos despite similar animal toxicity. The typical clinical presentation of severe dimethoate poisoning is quite distinct from that of chlorpyrifos and other OP pesticides: many patients present with hypotension that progresses to shock and death within 12-48 h post-ingestion. The pathophysiology of this syndrome is not clear. Case reports. We present here three patients with proven severe dimethoate poisoning. Clinically, all had inappropriate peripheral vasodilatation and profound hypotension on presentation, which progressed despite treatment with atropine, i.v. fluids, pralidoxime chloride, and inotropes. All died 2.5-32 h post-admission. Continuous cardiac monitoring and quantification of troponin T provided little evidence for a primary cardiotoxic effect of dimethoate. Conclusion. Severe dimethoate self-poisoning causes a syndrome characterized by marked hypotension with progression to distributive shock and death despite standard treatments. A lack of cardiotoxicity until just before death suggests that the mechanism is of OP-induced low systemic vascular resistance (SVR). Further invasive studies of cardiac function and SVR, and post-mortem histology, are required to better describe this syndrome and to establish the role of vasopressors and high-dose atropine in therapy.
Keywords: Heart
Keywords: Hypotension
Keywords: Troponin T
Keywords: Carcinoembryonic antigen
Keywords: Poisoning
Keywords: Chloride
Keywords: Toxicity
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Case reports
Keywords: Shock
Keywords: Vasodilation
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Dimethoate
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Atropine
Keywords: Vascular system
Date revised - 2009-01-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 880-884
ProQuest ID - 19801043
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Dimethoate; Hypotension; Poisoning; Chlorpyrifos; Atropine; Shock; Pesticides; Heart; Toxicity; Case reports; Chloride; Carcinoembryonic antigen; Vascular system; Troponin T; Vasodilation
Last updated - 2011-12-14
British nursing index edition - Clinical Toxicology [Clin. Toxicol.]. Vol. 46, no. 9, pp. 880-884. Nov 2008.
Corporate institution author - Davies, J; Roberts, D; Eyer, P; Buckley, N; Eddleston, M
DOI - MD-0009045524; 8859300; 1556-3650 English

294. Davis, M. K.; Boone, J. S.; Moran, J. E.; Tyler, J. W., and Chambers, J. E. Assessing intermittent pesticide exposure from flea control collars containing the organophosphorus insecticide tetrachlorvinphos. 2008; 18, (6): 564-570.


Rec #: 58789
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Fleas are a persistent problem for pets that require implementation of control measures. Consequently, pesticide use by homeowners for flea control is common and may increase pesticide exposure for adults and children. Fifty-five pet dogs (23 in study 1; 22 in study 2) of different breeds and weights were treated with over-the-counter flea collars containing tetrachlorvinphos (TCVP). During study 1, fur of treated dogs was monitored for transferable TCVP residues using cotton gloves to pet the dogs during 5-min rubbings post-collar application. Plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity was also measured in treated dogs. Average amounts of TCVP transferred from the fur of the neck (rubbing over the collar) and from the back to gloves at 3 days post-collar application were 23,700 +/- 2100 and 260 +/- 50 mu g/glove, respectively. No inhibition of plasma ChE was observed. During study 2, transferable TCVP residues to cotton gloves were monitored during 5-min rubbings post-collar application. Transferable residues were also monitored on cotton tee shirts worn by children and in the first morning urine samples obtained from adults and children. Average amounts of TCVP transferred to gloves at 5 days post-collar application from the neck (over the collar) and from the back were 22,400 +/- 2900 and 80 +/- 20 mu g/glove, respectively. Tee shirts worn by children on days 7-11 contained 1.8 +/- 0.8 mu g TCVP/g shirt. No significant differences were observed between adults and children in urinary 2,4,5-trichloromandelic acid (TCMA) levels; however, all TCMA residues (adults and children) were significantly greater than pretreatment concentrations (alpha=0.05). The lack of ChE inhibition in dogs and the low acute toxicity level of TCVP (rat oral LD(50) of 4-5 g/kg) strongly suggest that TCVP is rapidly detoxified and excreted and therefore poses a very low toxicological risk, despite these high residues.
Keywords: tetrachlorvinphos, human pesticide exposure, flea control, transferable
ISI Document Delivery No.: 364CJ

295. Davis, R. W. and Kamble, S. T. Dispersal of permethrin and a water-soluble dye affected by soil types and rodding tips after subsoil applications to control subterranean termites (Isoptera : Rhinotermitidae). 2008; 52, (2): 323-344.


Rec #: 58799
Keywords: METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Dispersal of permethrin (Dragent (R) FT) affected by soil types (sandy loam and silty clay loam) and rodding tips (straight, 360 degrees, 180 degrees [3.8 and 7.6 liters/min]) was investigated. Dragnet FT diluted in water (0.5% active ingredient [At]) was applied to soil at 6.06 liters per rodding point with a B&G rodding application tool (1.22 m depth) using a constant application pressure (172.4 kPa). Neither rodding tool tips nor soils provided significant differences in permethrin dispersal. The cis- and trans-permethrin isomers distributed similarly in both soils. The largest permethrin concentrations were observed in all applications within 15 cm of the rodding point (> 100 mu g/g [ppm]) and 0.0-1.22 m below the soil surface. Smaller quantities were generally detected in the soil with increase in distance from the rodding point (0-100 mu g/g). To provide sufficient permethrin overlap, rodding spacing should be positioned 15 cm apart. This will create a continuous termiticide barrier from 0.0-1.22 in beneath the soil surface along a structure's foundation for protection from subterranean termites. Rodding spacing of 30 cm will provide a barrier 0.61-1.22 m below the surface, but it may result in untreated areas between the soil surface and the treated soil (0.0-0.61m). Significant differences in permethrin dispersal are not expected regardless of the rodding tips or soil types. The validity of using a water-soluble fluorescent dye to estimate the dispersal patterns of permethrin in soils after rodding was also studied. Dragnet FT (0.5% At) and Pylam D&C Green #8 (hidacid uranine 0.5% AI) dye were concurrently applied in the sandy loam and silty clay loam soils. The dye was easier to visually detect in the sandy loam soil (> 83 mu g/g@ 90% probability) than in the silty clay loam soil (> 143 mu g/g@ 90% probability). The dye dispersal patterns were similar in both soils to those observed for permethrin. Visualdye (>83 mu g/g) and permethrin (> 10.00 mu g/g) were dispersed similarly in 83.7% of the sandy loam soil samples. However, in Silty clay loam, visual dye (> 143 mu g/g) and permethrin (> 10.00 mu g/g) were distributed similarly In 79.7% of the soil samples. Visual dye may be used as a conservative estimator of permethrin (> 10.00 mu g/g) dispersal in the silty clay loam. However, caution should be used when predicting permethrin distribution in sandy loam with a Visual dye because the dye may overestimate permethrin lateral dispersal.
Keywords: permethrin, subterranean termites, termiticide, dispersal, distribution,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 347TF

296. Davis, R. W. and Kamble, S. T. Distribution of Chlorpyrifos and a Water-Soluble Dye Affected by Rodding Tips and Soil Types Following Subsoil Applications to Control Subterranean Termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). SOIL; 2009; 54, (1): 175-198.


Rec #: 2910
Keywords: FATE
Call Number: NO FATE (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

297. Davis, R. W. and Kamble, S. T. Effect of rod tips and soil types on the distribution of imidacloprid and a water soluble dye following subsoil rodding application for subterranean termite control (Isoptera : Rhinotermitidae). 2008; 51, (2): 437-460.


Rec #: 58809
Keywords: METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The effects of soil type (sandy loam and silty clay loam), and rodding tool tip (straight, 360 degrees, 180 degrees [3.8 and 7.6 liters/min]) on the distribution of Premise (R) 75 (imidacloprid) were studied. Water diluted Premise 75 (0.05% AI, 6.06 liters) was applied to the soils per rodding point with a B&G (R) rodding application tool (1.22 m) using a constant application pressure (172.4 kPa). No significant differences in imidacloprid distribution resulted from the rodding tip or soil type. In all applications, the largest imidacloprid concentrations were located within 0.15 m of the injection site (> 10 mu g/g) 0-1.22 m below the soil surface. Generally, lesser termiticide quantities were detected in the soil with an increase in distance from the injection point (0-10 mu g/g). Based on these results, rodding hole spacing 15 cm apart will provide sufficient imidacloprid overlap. This will create a continuous soil termiticide barrier from 0.0-1.22 m beneath the soil surface along a structure's foundation for protection from subterranean termites. Rodding spacing of 30 cm will provide a continuous barrier 0.61-1.22 m below the surface, but may result in untreated soil areas between the soil surface and the treated soil (0.0-61.0 m). Important differences in imidacloprid distribution are not expected regardless of the rodding tip selection or these soil types. The validity of using a water soluble fluorescent dye to estimate the distribution patterns of a termiticide active ingredient in Nebraska soils after rodding also was investigated. Premise 75 (imidacloprid 0.05% AI) and Pylam D&C Green #8 (hidacid uranine 0.5% AI) were concurrently applied. The dye was easier to visually detect in the sandy loam (>83ppm @ 90% probability) than in the silty clay loam (> 143 ppm @ 90% probability). The dye distribution patterns in the soils were similar to those observed for imidacloprid. In the sandy loam, visual dye (>83 ppm) and imidacloprid (> 1.00 mu g/g) were distributed similarly in 88.8% of the soil samples. In the silty clay loam, visual dye (> 143 ppm) and imidacloprid (> 1.00 mu g/g) were distributed similarly in 83.7% of the soil samples. The dye (visual) may be used as a conservative estimator of imidacloprid (> 1.00 mu g/g) distribution in the silty clay loam. However, caution should be exercised when using dye in predicting imidacloprid distribution in sandy loam soils since it may overestimate insecticide lateral dispersion.
Keywords: subterranean termites, imidacloprid, termiticide distribution, dye,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 280IL

298. Dayton, S B; Sandler, D P; Blair, a; Alavanja, M; Freeman, Leb; Hoppin, Ja, and Dayton, S B. Pesticide Use and Myocardial Infarction Incidence Among Farm Women in the Agricultural Health Study. 2010 Jul; 52, (7): 693-697.


Rec #: 44029
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the relationship between pesticide use and myocardial infarction (MI) among farm women. Background: Little is known about the potential association between pesticide use and cardiovascular outcomes. Methods: We used logistic regression to evaluate pesticide use and self-reported incident nonfatal MI among women in the Agricultural Health Study. Results: Of those Mi-free at enrollment (n = 22,425), 168 reported an MI after enrollment. We saw no association with pesticide use overall. Six of 27 individual pesticides evaluated were significantly associated with nonfatal MI, including chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, carbofuran, metalaxyl, pendimethalin, and trifluralin, which all had odds ratios >1.7. These chemicals were used by <10% of the cases, and their use was correlated, making it difficult to attribute the risk elevation to a specific pesticide. Conclusion: Pesticides may contribute to MI risk among farm women.
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Chemicals
Keywords: Risk Abstracts
Keywords: myocardial infarction
Keywords: farms
Keywords: Occupational Health And Safety
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Trifluralin
Keywords: R2 23060:Medical and environmental health
Keywords: carbofuran
Keywords: Females
Keywords: pendimethalin
Date revised - 2011-06-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 693-697
ProQuest ID - 876476730
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Chlorpyrifos; Chemicals; myocardial infarction; farms; Pesticides; Trifluralin; carbofuran; Females; pendimethalin
Last updated - 2011-10-24
Corporate institution author - Dayton, S B; Sandler, D P; Blair, A; Alavanja, M; Freeman, LEB; Hoppin, JA
DOI - OB-MD-0015856360; 14690980; 1076-2752 English

299. de Cock, M.; Maas, Y. G. H., and van de Bor, M. Does perinatal exposure to endocrine disruptors induce autism spectrum and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders? Review. 2012; 101, (8): 811-818.


Rec #: 58839
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Aim: To provide an overview of studies on perinatal exposure in humans to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in relation to autism spectrum (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity (ADHD) disorders. Methods: A review of the literature (PubMed) was performed. Exposure-related keywords, including various chemicals, were matched with keywords describing outcome. Animal studies as well as publications not written in English were excluded. In total, 834 titles were retrieved. The final selection included 21 publications. Results: Positive associations were found for ASD in relation to exposure to all chemicals investigated, which included hazardous air pollutants, pesticides and bisphenol A (BPA). Increased risks of ADHD or positive associations were found for exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dialkyl phosphate (DAP) and chlorpyrifos. BPA, polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and low molecular weight (LMW) phthalates were positively associated with externalizing behaviour. Five of 17 studies did not find any association between exposure and ADHD. Conclusion: Perinatal exposure to EDCs appears to be associated with the occurrence of ASD as well as ADHD. Disruption of thyroid hormone function and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic mechanisms may offer an explanation for the observed relations; though, conclusive evidence in humans is limited.
Keywords: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, Autism spectrum disorders,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 973ZA

300. de Joode, Berna van Wendel; Barraza, Douglas; Ruepert, Clemens; Mora, Ana Mar+ a; C+¦rdoba, Leonel; +ûberg, Mattias; Wesseling, Catharina; Mergler, Donna, and Lindh, Christian. Children nearby organic plantation have lower levels of chlorpyrifos metabolites. 2012 Jun 17-; 211, Supplement, (0): S173.


Rec #: 2640
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

301. De Lange, Hendrika J; Lahr, Joost; Van Der Pol, Joost J C; Wessels, Yolanda, and Faber, Jack H. Ecological Vulnerability in Wildlife: an Expert Judgment and Multicriteria Analysis Tool Using Ecological Traits to Assess Relative Impact of Pollutants. 2009 Oct; 28, (10): 2233-40.


Rec #: 44579
Keywords: MODELING
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Nature development in The Netherlands often is planned on contaminated soils and sediments of former agricultural land and in floodplain areas; however, this contamination may present a risk to wildlife species desired at those nature development sites. Specific risk assessment methods are needed, because toxicological information is lacking for most wildlife species. The vulnerability of a species is a combination of its potential exposure, sensitivity to the type of pollutant, and recovery capacity. We developed a new method to predict ecological vulnerability in wildlife using autecological information. The analysis results in an ordinal ranking of vulnerable species. The method was applied to six representative contaminants: copper and zinc (essential metals, low to medium toxicity), cadmium (nonessential metal, high toxicity), DDT (persistent organic pesticide, high toxicity), chlorpyrifos (persistent organophosphate insecticide, high toxicity), and ivermectin (persistent veterinary pharmaceutical, low to medium toxicity). High vulnerability to the essential metals copper and zinc was correlated with soil and sediment habitat preference of a species and with r-strategy (opportunistic strategy suited for unstable environments). Increased vulnerability to the bioaccumulating substances cadmium and DDT was correlated with higher position of a species in the food web and with life span and K-strategy (equilibrium strategy suited for stable environments). Vulnerability to chlorpyrifos and ivermectin was high for species with a preference for soil habitats. The ecological vulnerability analysis has potential to further our abilities in risk assessment. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
Keywords: Animals
Keywords: Ivermectin -- analysis
Keywords: Copper
Keywords: Risk Assessment
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- analysis
Keywords: Ivermectin -- toxicity
Keywords: Ivermectin
Keywords: Zinc
Keywords: Cadmium -- toxicity
Keywords: DDT -- toxicity
Keywords: Cadmium
Keywords: Environmental Pollution -- analysis
Keywords: DDT -- analysis
Keywords: Decision Support Techniques
Keywords: Animals, Wild -- physiology
Keywords: Cadmium -- analysis
Keywords: Zinc -- toxicity
Keywords: Ecotoxicology -- methods
Keywords: Environmental Pollution -- adverse effects
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Environmental Monitoring
Keywords: Zinc -- analysis
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- toxicity
Keywords: Geologic Sediments -- analysis
Keywords: DDT
Keywords: Copper -- analysis
Keywords: Species Specificity
Keywords: Copper -- toxicity
Copyright - Copyright Allen Press Publishing Services Oct 2009
Language of summary - English
Pages - 2233-40
ProQuest ID - 210333791
Document feature - Tables; Graphs; References
Last updated - 2012-02-22
Place of publication - Oxford
Corporate institution author - De Lange, Hendrika J; Lahr, Joost; Van der Pol, Joost J C; Wessels, Yolanda; Faber, Jack H
DOI - 1869191441; 48733951; 68221; ETXC; 19432506; INODETXC0005967668
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302. De Lange, Hendrika J; Lahr, Joost; Van Der Pol, Joost Jc; Faber, Jack H, and De Lange, Hendrika J. Ecological Vulnerability in Wildlife: Application of a Species-Ranking Method to Food Chains and Habitats. 2010 Dec 1; 29, (12): 2875-2880.


Rec #: 43739
Keywords: MODELING
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Nature development in The Netherlands is often planned on contaminated soils or sediments. This contamination may present a risk for wildlife species desired at those nature development sites and must be assessed by specific risk assessment methods. In a previous study, we developed a
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