Appendix 2-5: Rejected ecotox bibliography for Chlorpyrifos



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Keywords: Hindgut
Keywords: Community structure
Keywords: DNA
Date revised - 2012-01-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 2102-2104
ProQuest ID - 907232618
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Soil; Environmental monitoring; Digestive tract; Hindgut; Toxicants; Community structure; Organic matter; DNA; Food contamination; Microbial activity; Isopoda; Bacteria; Crustacea; Porcellio dilatatus
Last updated - 2012-01-26
Corporate institution author - Santos, MJG; Sousa, J P; Tiago, I; Verissimo, A; Lemos, MFL
DOI - OB-MD-0017451604; 15742541; 1464-0325 English

1184. Sanyal, Doyeli and Rani, Anita. Proficiency Test for Chemical Laboratories for the Analysis of a Pesticide in a Formulated Product: Interlaboratory Study. 2009; 92, (1): 271-278.


Rec #: 45229
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A multilaboratory proficiency testing program was conducted by the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories (India) and coordinated by the Institute of Pesticide Formulation Technology. This program was conducted to compare the performance of individual laboratories in the area of pesticide formulation (Chlorpyrifos 20 EC) analysis. A total of 24 laboratories in India participated. Analysis of 2 parameters (i.e., estimation of the active ingredient and the acidity) of 2 samples of Chlorpyrifos 20 EC was the objective of this program. Homogeneity tests were performed before sample distribution. Performance of the participating laboratories was evaluated by using new robust statistics given in the guidelines of the National Association of Testing Authorities, Australia. Results were collated and statistically computed to calculate the value of 2 types of Z-scores (Zwi and Zbi). In addition to the statistical analysis, a graphical representation such as the Youden plot was also generated to evaluate the performance of participating laboratories.
Keywords: Pesticides -- analysis
Keywords: 2921-88-2
Keywords: Analysis of Variance
Keywords: Accreditation -- standards
Keywords: Reproducibility of Results
Keywords: Materials Testing -- standards
Keywords: Materials Testing -- methods
Keywords: Calibration
Keywords: Insecticides -- analysis
Keywords: Laboratories -- standards
Keywords: India
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- analysis
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: 0
Keywords: Pesticides
Date completed - 2009-06-23
Date created - 2009-04-22
Date revised - 2012-12-20
Language of summary - English
Pages - 271-278
ProQuest ID - 67156649
Last updated - 2013-01-19
British nursing index edition - Journal of AOAC International, January 2009, 92(1):271-278
Corporate institution author - Sanyal, Doyeli; Rani, Anita
DOI - MEDL-19382586; 19382586; 1060-3271 eng

1185. Sarkar, O. ; Mathur, P. P.; Cheng, C. Y., and Mruk, D. D. Interleukin 1 Alpha (Il1a) Is a Novel Regulator of the Blood-Testis Barrier in the Rat.


Rec #: 51339
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: Throughout spermatogenesis, leptotene spermatocytes must traverse the blood-testis barrier (BTB) at stages VIII-XI to gain entry into the adluminal compartment for continued development. However, the mechanism underlying BTB restructuring remains somewhat elusive. In this study, interleukin 1 alpha (IL1A) was administered intratesticularly to adult rats in order to assess its effects on spermatogenesis. IL1A was shown to perturb Sertoli-germ cell adhesion, resulting in germ cell loss from approximately 50% of seminiferous tubules by 15 days posttreatment. Equally important, the functional integrity of the BTB was compromised when inulin-fluorescein isothiocyanate was detected in the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium following its administration via the jugular vein. Interestingly, IL1A did not affect the steady-state levels of proteins that confer BTB function, namely OCLN, CLDN1, F11R, TJP1, and CDH2. Instead, the localizations of OCLN, F11R, and TJP1 in the seminiferous epithelium were altered; these proteins appeared to move away from sites of cell-cell contact. Moreover, IL1A was shown to perturb the orderly arrangement of filamentous actin at the BTB and apical ectoplasmic specialization with distinct areas illustrating loss of actin filaments. Taken collectively, these results suggest that IL1A-induced BTB disruption is not mediated via the reduction of target protein levels. Instead, IL1A's primary cellular target appears to be the Sertoli cell actin cytoskeleton. It is possible that localized production of IL1A by Sertoli and/or germ cells in vivo results in BTB restructuring, and this may facilitate the movement of leptotene spermatocytes across the BTB.
MESH HEADINGS: Actins/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: Blood-Testis Barrier/drug effects/metabolism/*physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Cell Adhesion/drug effects
MESH HEADINGS: Cell Membrane Permeability/drug effects
MESH HEADINGS: Interleukin-1alpha/metabolism/pharmacology/*physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Male
MESH HEADINGS: Models, Biological
MESH HEADINGS: Rats
MESH HEADINGS: Rats, Sprague-Dawley
MESH HEADINGS: Sertoli Cells/drug effects/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Spermatogenesis/drug effects
MESH HEADINGS: Spermatogonia/drug effects/metabolism/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Tight Junctions/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Tissue Distribution/drug effects eng

1186. Sarkouhi, M.; Shamsipur, M., and Hassan, J. (31)P-NMR evaluation of organophosphorus pesticides degradation through metal ion promoted hydrolysis. 2012; 184, (12): 7383-7393.


Rec #: 68359
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The degradation of some organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in the presence of metal ions was studied by (31)P-NMR spectroscopy. Both (31)P-NMR and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy results were used in order to determine the nature of metabolites formed after degradation. The degraded organophosphorus pesticide were investigated for chlorpyrifos and phoxim in the presence of several metal ions including Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), and Ag(+). (31)P-NMR results indicated Ag(+) and Hg(2+) ion promoted degradation of OPPs and other metal ions formed complex with OPPs and cannot degrade OPPs. We found that the degradation of chlorpyrifos and phoxim with Ag(+) or Hg(2+) led to the formation of O,O-diethyl-O-methyl phosphorothionate, (C(2)H(5)O)(2)(CH(3)O)PS, at metal ion/pesticide mole ratios <= 1.0 and completely decomposed at a higher mole ratio of 10. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the degradation study of a number of technical and formulated pesticides in the presence of Ag(+) ion at a metal ion/pesticide mole ratio of 10.
Keywords: P-NMR, Organophosphorus pesticides, Metal ions, Degradation
ISI Document Delivery No.: 032TO

1187. Sarkouhi, Masoumeh; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Hassan, Jalal, and Sarkouhi, Masoumeh. Super(31)P-Nmr Evaluation of Organophosphorus Pesticides Degradation Through Metal Ion Promoted Hydrolysis. 2012 Dec; 184, (12): 7383-7393.


Rec #: 42399
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The degradation of some organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in the presence of metal ions was studied by super(31)P-NMR spectroscopy. Both super(31)P-NMR and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy results were used in order to determine the nature of metabolites formed after degradation. The degraded organophosphorus pesticide were investigated for chlorpyrifos and phoxim in the presence of several metal ions including Hg super(2+), Cu super(2+), Cd super(2+), Ni super(2+), Pb super(2+), and Ag super(+). super(31)P-NMR results indicated Ag super(+) and Hg super(2+) ion promoted degradation of OPPs and other metal ions formed complex with OPPs and cannot degrade OPPs. We found that the degradation of chlorpyrifos and phoxim with Ag super(+) or Hg super(2+) led to the formation of O,O-diethyl-O-me thyl phosphorothionate, (C sub(2)H sub(5)O) sub(2)(CH sub(3)O)PS, at metal ion/pesticide mole ratios less than or equal to 1.0 and completely decomposed at a higher mole ratio of 10. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the degradation study of a number of technical and formulated pesticides in the presence of Ag super(+) ion at a metal ion/pesticide mole ratio of 10.
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Metals
Keywords: Metal ions
Keywords: Degradation
Keywords: ENA 09:Land Use & Planning
Keywords: Environment Abstracts; Oceanic Abstracts
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Metabolites
Keywords: Spectroscopy
Keywords: Hydrolysis
Keywords: Mass spectroscopy
Date revised - 2013-01-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 7383-7393
ProQuest ID - 1272704134
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Chlorpyrifos; Metals; Metal ions; Degradation; Pesticides; Metabolites; Spectroscopy; Hydrolysis; Mass spectroscopy
Last updated - 2013-02-08
British nursing index edition - Environmental Monitoring and Assessment [Environ. Monit. Assess.]. Vol. 184, no. 12, pp. 7383-7393. Dec 2012.
Corporate institution author - Sarkouhi, Masoumeh; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Hassan, Jalal
DOI - 5894cc93-4c79-4616-b16cmfgefd107; 17443605; 0167-6369; 1573-2959 English

1188. Sasikala, C.; Jiwal, S.; Rout, P., and Ramya, M. Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by bacterial consortium isolated from agriculture soil. 2012; 28, (3): 1301-1308.


Rec #: 68369
Keywords: BACTERIA
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Organophosphorous pesticides are widely used in agriculture to control major insect pests. Chlorpyrifos is one of the major organophosphorous pesticides which is used to control insects including termites, beetles. The widespread use of these pesticides is hazardous to the environment and also toxic to mammals, thus it is essential to remove the same from the environment. From the chlorpyrifos contaminated soil nine morphologically different bacterial strains, one actinomycete and two fungal strains were isolated. Among those isolates four bacterial strains which were more efficient were developed as consortium. The four bacterial isolates namely Pseudomonas putida (NII 1117), Klebsiella sp., (NII 1118), Pseudomonas stutzeri (NII 1119), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NII 1120) present in the consortia were identified on the basis of 16S rDNA analysis. The intracellular fractions of the consortium exhibited more organophosphorus hydrolase activity (0.171 +/- A 0.003 U/mL/min). The degradation studies were carried out at neutral pH and temperature 37A degrees C with chlorpyrifos concentration 500 mg L(-1). LC-mass spectral analysis showed the presence of metabolites chlopyrifos-oxon and Diethylphosphorothioate. These results highlight an important potential use of this consortium for the cleanup of chlorpyrifos contaminated pesticide waste in the environment.
Keywords: Biodegradation, Organophosphorous pesticides, Chlorpyrifos, Chlorpyrifos
ISI Document Delivery No.: 892MN

1189. Saulsbury, Md; Heyliger, So; Wang, K; Round, D, and Saulsbury, MD. Characterization of Chlorpyrifos-Induced Apoptosis in Placental Cells. 2008 Feb 28; 244, (2-3): 98-110.


Rec #: 42269
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The mechanism by which chlorpyrifos exerts its toxicity in fetal and perinatal animals has yet to be elucidated. Since the placenta is responsible for transport of nutrients and is a major supplier hormone to the fetus, exposure to xenobiotics that alter the function or viability of placenta cells could ostensibly alter the development of the fetus. In this study, JAR cells were used to determine if CPF and the metabolites 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO) are toxic to the placenta. Our results indicate that chlorpyrifos (CPF), and its metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO) caused a dose-dependent reduction in cellular viability with CPF being more toxic than its metabolites. Chlorpyrifos-induced toxicity was characterized by the loss of mitochondrial potential, the appearance of nuclear condensation and fragmentation, down-regulation of Bcl-2 as well as up-regulation of TNF alpha and FAS mRNA. Pharmacological inhibition of FAS, nicotinic and TNF- alpha receptors did not attenuate CPF-induced toxicity. Atropine exhibited minimal ability to reverse toxicity. Furthermore, signal transduction inhibitors PD98059, SP600125, LY294002 and U0126 failed to attenuate toxicity; however, SB202190 (inhibitor of p38 alpha and p38sz MAPK) sensitized cells to CPF-induced toxicity. Pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh produced a slight but significant reversal of CPF-induced toxicity indicating that the major caspase pathways are not integral to CPF-induced toxicity. Taken collectively, these results suggest that chlorpyrifos induces apoptosis in placental cells through pathways not dependent on FAS /TNF signaling, activation of caspases or inhibition of cholinesterase. In addition, our data further indicates that activation of p38 MAPK is integral to the protection cells against CPF-induced injury.
Keywords: MAP kinase
Keywords: Pharmacy And Pharmacology
Keywords: Apoptosis
Keywords: Injuries
Keywords: Fetal alcohol syndrome
Keywords: Mitochondria
Keywords: Nutrients
Keywords: Metabolites
Keywords: Xenobiotics
Keywords: Toxicity
Keywords: Cholinesterase
Keywords: Hormones
Keywords: Fetuses
Keywords: mRNA
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Placenta
Keywords: Tumor necrosis factor-^a
Keywords: Caspase
Keywords: Condensation
Keywords: Bcl-2 protein
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Signal transduction
Keywords: Atropine
Date revised - 2008-06-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 98-110
ProQuest ID - 289837567
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Toxicity; Placenta; Chlorpyrifos; Metabolites; Fetal alcohol syndrome; Fetuses; MAP kinase; Tumor necrosis factor-^a; Apoptosis; Signal transduction; Caspase; Nutrients; Mitochondria; Xenobiotics; Hormones; Injuries; Atropine; Bcl-2 protein; Condensation; mRNA; Cholinesterase
Last updated - 2011-11-02
Corporate institution author - Saulsbury, MD; Heyliger, SO; Wang, K; Round, D
DOI - OB-MD-0008082769; 8184214; 0300-483X English

1190. Saunders, Margaret; Magnanti, Brooke L; Correia Carreira, Sara; Yang, Aileen; Alamo-HernăˇNdez, Urinda; Riojas-Rodriguez, Horacio ; Calamandrei, Gemma; Koppe, Janna G; Krayer Von Krauss, Martin; Keune, Hans, and Bartonova, Alena. Chlorpyrifos and Neurodevelopmental Effects: a Literature Review and Expert Elicitation on Research and Policy. 2012; 11, (Suppl 1): S5.


Rec #: 39099
Keywords: ABSTRACT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Doc number: S5 Abstract Background: Organophosphate pesticides are widely used on food crops grown in the EU. While they have been banned from indoor use in the US for a decade due to adverse health effects, they are still the most prevalent pesticides in the EU, with Chlorpyrifos (CPF) being the most commonly applied. It has been suggested CPF affects neurodevelopment even at levels below toxicity guidelines. Younger individuals may be more susceptible than adults due to biological factors and exposure settings. Methods: A literature review was undertaken to assess the evidence for CPF contributing to neurodevelopmental disorders in infants and children. Other literature was consulted in order to formulate a causal chain diagram showing the origins, uptake, and neurological effects of animal and human exposure to CPF. The causal chain diagram and a questionnaire were distributed online to scientific experts who had published in relevant areas of research. They were asked to assess their confidence levels on whether CPF does in fact contribute to adverse neurodevelopment outcomes and rate their confidence in the scientific evidence. A second questionnaire queried experts as to which kind of policy action they consider justifiable based on current knowledge. In a special workshop session at the EuroTox congress in Dresden in 2009 the results of both questionnaires were further discussed with invited experts, as a basis for a policy brief with main messages for policy makers and stakeholders. Results: Most experts who responded to the first questionnaire felt that there was already enough evidence to support a ban on indoor uses of CPF in the EU. However, most felt additional research is still required in several areas. The responses from the first questionnaire were used to formulate the second questionnaire addressing the feasibility of government action. In turn, these expert participants were invited to attend a special session at the EuroTox congress in Dresden in 2009. Conclusions: Some of the evidence that CPF contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders is still disputed among experts, and the overall sense is that further research and public awareness are warranted. There have been campaigns in North America making the potential exposure concerns known, but such information is not widely known in the EU. The ability of government action to produce change is strongly felt in some quarters while others believe better knowledge of consumer use trends would have a greater impact.
Keywords: Insecticides -- toxicity
Keywords: Insecticides -- metabolism
Keywords: Environmental Health
Keywords: Humans
Keywords: Nervous System -- drug effects
Keywords: Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects -- epidemiology
Keywords: Child Development -- drug effects
Keywords: Child
Keywords: Health Policy
Keywords: Expert Testimony
Keywords: Pregnancy
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: European Union
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- toxicity
Keywords: Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects -- chemically induced
Keywords: Environmental Exposure
Keywords: Male
Keywords: Female
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- metabolism
Copyright - © 2012 Saunders et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language of summary - English
Pages - S5
ProQuest ID - 1022432554
Last updated - 2012-11-07
Place of publication - London
Corporate institution author - Saunders, Margaret; Magnanti, Brooke L; Correia Carreira, Sara; Yang, Aileen; Alamo-Hernández, Urinda; Riojas-Rodriguez, Horacio; Calamandrei, Gemma; Koppe, Janna G; Krayer von Krauss, Martin; Keune, Hans; Bartonova, Alena
DOI - 2698091141; 70110152; 58366; ENVH; 22759505; BMDDENVH201201011476069X11S1S5
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1191. Savard, C. ; Gu‚Rin, A.; Drouin, K.; Bolduc, M.; Lalibert‚-Gagn‚, M. E.; Dumas, M. C.; Majeau, N., and Leclerc, D. Improvement of the Trivalent Inactivated Flu Vaccine Using Papmv Nanoparticles.


Rec #: 50119
Keywords: NO TOXICANT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: Commercial seasonal flu vaccines induce production of antibodies directed mostly towards hemaglutinin (HA). Because HA changes rapidly in the circulating virus, the protection remains partial. Several conserved viral proteins, e.g., nucleocapsid (NP) and matrix proteins (M1), are present in the vaccine, but are not immunogenic. To improve the protection provided by these vaccines, we used nanoparticles made of the coat protein of a plant virus (papaya mosaic virus; PapMV) as an adjuvant. Immunization of mice and ferrets with the adjuvanted formulation increased the magnitude and breadth of the humoral response to NP and to highly conserved regions of HA. They also triggered a cellular mediated immune response to NP and M1, and long-lasting protection in animals challenged with a heterosubtypic influenza strain (WSN/33). Thus, seasonal flu vaccine adjuvanted with PapMV nanoparticles can induce universal protection to influenza, which is a major advancement when facing a pandemic.
MESH HEADINGS: Amino Acid Sequence
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: Biological Transport
MESH HEADINGS: Carica/*virology
MESH HEADINGS: Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/chemistry/immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Immunity, Humoral/immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Influenza Vaccines/*chemistry/*immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Interferon-gamma/immunology/secretion
MESH HEADINGS: Lymph Nodes/immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Male
MESH HEADINGS: Mice
MESH HEADINGS: Molecular Sequence Data
MESH HEADINGS: Mosaic Viruses/*chemistry/*immunology/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Nanoparticles/*virology
MESH HEADINGS: Seasons
MESH HEADINGS: T-Lymphocytes/immunology/secretion
MESH HEADINGS: Vaccines, Inactivated/chemistry/immunology/metabolism eng

1192. Schadendorf, D.; Algarra, S. M.; Bastholt, L.; Cinat, G.; Dreno, B.; Eggermont, A. M.; Espinosa, E.; Guo, J.; Hauschild, A.; Petrella, T.; Schachter, J., and Hersey, P. Immunotherapy of Distant Metastatic Disease.


Rec #: 50809
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated with significant toxicity and poor efficacy that does not improve overall survival of 96% of patients. Many studies with allogeneic and autologous vaccines have demonstrated no clinical benefit, and some randomised trials even showed a detrimental effect in the vaccine arm. The ongoing effort to develop melanoma vaccines based on dendritic cells and peptides is driven by advances in understanding antigen presentation and processing, and by new techniques of vaccine preparation, stabilisation and delivery. Several agents that have shown promising activity in metastatic melanoma including IL-21 and monoclonal antibodies targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (anti-CTLA-4) or CD137 are discussed. Recent advances of intratumour gene transfer technologies and adoptive immunotherapy, which represents a promising although technically challenging direction, are also discussed.
MESH HEADINGS: Cancer Vaccines/*therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: *Immunotherapy
MESH HEADINGS: Melanoma/secondary/*therapy
MESH HEADINGS: Skin Neoplasms/pathology/*therapy eng

1193. Schaffer, A. Pesticide Effects on Enzyme Activities in the Soil Ecosystem. 1993: 273-340.


Rec #: 1930
Keywords: REVIEW
Call Number: NO REVIEW (24D,24DXY,ACR,ADC,ATZ,BMY,BS,BTY,CAP,CBD,CBL,CPP,CPY,CTN,Captan,DD,DFQ,DMB,DMT,DU,DZ,EP,FMP,FNT,Folpet,GYP,LNR,MB,MCPP1,MDT,MITC,MLN,MTL,MZB,Maneb,NaN3,OML,OMT,OXD,PAQT,PMT,PPN,PPX,PRT,PYZ,SID,SZ,TBC,TBO,TCF,TDF,TFN,THM)
Notes: EcoReference No.: 110308
Chemical of Concern: 24D,24DXY,ACR,ADC,ATZ,BMY,BS,BTC,BTY,CAP,CBD,CBL,CHO,CPP,CPY,CTN,CYC,CZE,Captan,DD,DFQ,DLD,DMB,DMT,DU,DZ,EN,EP,EPRN,ETN,FMP,FMU,FNF,FNT,FRN,Folpet,GYP,HCCH,HYX,LNR,MB,MBZ,MCPP1,MDT,MITC,MLN,MTL,MZB,Maneb,NTP,NaN3,OML,OMT,OXD,PAQT,PCL,PDMN,PIM,PMT,PPCP,PPN,PPX,PRN,PRT,PYZ,SID,SZ,TBC,TBO,TCF,TDF,TFN,TFT,THM,TMMC,TOL

1194. Schleier, Jerome J; Davis, Ryan S; Barber, Loren M; Macedo, Paula a, and Peterson, Robert K D. A Probabilistic Risk Assessment for Deployed Military Personnel After the Implementation of the "Leishmaniasis Control Program" at Tallil Air Base, Iraq. 2009 May; 46, (3): 693-702.


Rec #: 44829
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Leishmaniasis has been of concern to the U.S. military and has re-emerged in importance because of recent deployments to the Middle East. We conducted a retrospective probabilistic risk assessment for military personnel potentially exposed to insecticides during the "Leishmaniasis Control Plan" (LCP) undertaken in 2003 at Tallil Air Base, Iraq. We estimated acute and subchronic risks from resmethrin, malathion, piperonyl butoxide (PBO), and pyrethrins applied using a truck-mounted ultra-low-volume (ULV) sprayer and lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and cypermethrin used for residual sprays. We used the risk quotient (RQ) method for our risk assessment (estimated environmental exposure/toxic endpoint) and set the RQ level of concern (LOC) at 1.0. Acute RQs for truck-mounted ULV and residual sprays ranged from 0.00007 to 33.3 at the 95th percentile. Acute exposure to lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, and chlorpyrifos exceeded the RQ LOC. Subchronic RQs for truck-mounted ULV and residual sprays ranged from 0.00008 to 32.8 at the 95th percentile. Subchronic exposures to lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos exceeded the LOC. However, estimated exposures to lambda-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, and chlorpyrifos did not exceed their respective no observed adverse effect levels.
Keywords: Insecticides -- toxicity
Keywords: United States
Keywords: Leishmaniasis -- prevention & control
Keywords: Animals
Keywords: Pyrethrins -- toxicity
Keywords: Humans
Keywords: Models, Statistical
Keywords: Iraq
Keywords: Risk Assessment
Keywords: Organophosphorus Compounds
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: 0
Keywords: Pyrethrins
Keywords: Military Personnel
Keywords: Organophosphorus Compounds -- toxicity
Keywords: Psychodidae -- parasitology
Keywords: Occupational Exposure -- analysis
Keywords: Insect Control
Date completed - 2009-08-06
Date created - 2009-06-05
Date revised - 2012-12-20
Language of summary - English
Pages - 693-702
ProQuest ID - 67327780
Last updated - 2013-01-19
British nursing index edition - Journal of medical entomology, May 2009, 46(3):693-702
Corporate institution author - Schleier, Jerome J; Davis, Ryan S; Barber, Loren M; Macedo, Paula A; Peterson, Robert K D
DOI - MEDL-19496443; 19496443; 0022-2585 eng

1195. Schlumpf, Margret; Kypke, Karin; Wittassek, Matthias; Angerer, Juergen; Mascher, Hermann; Mascher, Daniel; Voekt, Cora; Birchler, Monika; Lichtensteiger, Walter, and Schlumpf, Margret. Exposure Patterns of Uv Filters, Fragrances, Parabens, Phthalates, Organochlor Pesticides, Pbdes, and Pcbs in Human Milk: Correlation of Uv Filters With Use of Cosmetics. 2010 Nov; 81, (10): 1171-1183.


Rec #: 47619
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: In order to assess potential risks of exposure to environmental chemicals, more information on concomitant exposure to different chemicals is needed. We present data on chemicals in human milk of a cohort study (2004, 2005, 2006) of 54 mother/child pairs, where for the first time, cosmetic UV filters, synthetic musks, parabens and phthalate metabolites were analyzed in the same sample along with persistent organochlor pollutants (POPs), i.e., organochlor pesticides and metabolites, polybrominated diphenylethers and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The two groups of chemicals exhibited different exposure patterns. Six out of seven PCB congeners and a majority of pesticides were present in all milk samples, with significant correlations between certain PCB congener and pesticide levels, whereas the cosmetic-derived compounds, UV filters, parabens and synthetic musks, exhibited a more variable exposure pattern with inter-individual differences. UV filters were present in 85.2% of milk samples, in the range of PCB levels. Comparison with a questionnaire revealed a significant correlation between use of products containing UV filters and their presence in milk for two frequently used and detected UV filters, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor and octocrylene, and for the whole group of UV filters. Concentrations of PCBs and organochlor pesticides were within ranges seen in Western and Southern European countries. For several POPs, mean and/or maximum daily intake calculated from individual concentrations was above recent US EPA reference dose values. Our data emphasize the need for analyses of complex mixtures to obtain more information on inter-individual and temporal variability of human exposure to different types of chemicals.
Keywords: Chemicals
Keywords: Inventories
Keywords: X 24340:Cosmetics, Toiletries & Household Products
Keywords: Data processing
Keywords: Milk
Keywords: Breast milk
Keywords: Metabolites
Keywords: Cosmetics
Keywords: ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety
Keywords: Phthalic acid
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Filters
Keywords: phthalates
Keywords: Toxicology Abstracts; Environment Abstracts; Pollution Abstracts
Keywords: P 9000:ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION
Keywords: polychlorinated biphenyls
Keywords: Pollutants
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: cosmetics
Keywords: Congeners
Keywords: Sunscreens
Keywords: Fragrances
Keywords: PCB compounds
Keywords: PCB
Date revised - 2011-10-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 1171-1183
ProQuest ID - 845867038
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Inventories; Data processing; Breast milk; Cosmetics; Metabolites; Phthalic acid; polychlorinated biphenyls; Pollutants; Pesticides; Sunscreens; Congeners; Fragrances; PCB; Chemicals; Filters; phthalates; Milk; cosmetics; PCB compounds
Last updated - 2011-12-13
Corporate institution author - Schlumpf, Margret; Kypke, Karin; Wittassek, Matthias; Angerer, Juergen; Mascher, Hermann; Mascher, Daniel; Voekt, Cora; Birchler, Monika; Lichtensteiger, Walter
DOI - OB-5ede22d4-3f1e-4093-a21ecsamfg201; 13961404; 0045-6535 English

1196. Schlusselhuber, M.; Jung, S.; Bruhn, O.; Goux, D. ; Leippe, M.; Leclercq, R.; Laugier, C.; Gr”Tzinger, J., and Cauchard, J. In Vitro Potential of Equine Defa1 and Ecath1 as Alternative Antimicrobial Drugs in Rhodococcosis Treatment.


Rec #: 49999
Keywords: BACTERIA
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: ABSTRACT: Rhodococcus equi, the causal agent of rhodococcosis, is a severe pathogen of foals but also of immunodeficient humans, causing bronchopneumonia. The pathogen is often found together with Klebsiella pneumoniae or Streptococcus zooepidemicus in foals. Of great concern is the fact that some R. equi strains are already resistant to commonly used antibiotics. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro potential of two equine antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), eCATH1 and DEFA1, as new drugs against R. equi and its associated pathogens. The peptides led to growth inhibition and death of R. equi and S. zooepidemicus at low micromolar concentrations. Moreover, eCATH1 was able to inhibit growth of K. pneumoniae. Both peptides caused rapid disruption of the R. equi membrane, leading to cell lysis. Interestingly, eCATH1 had a synergic effect together with rifampin. Furthermore, eCATH1 was not cytotoxic against mammalian cells at bacteriolytic concentrations and maintained its high killing activity even at physiological salt concentrations. Our data suggest that equine AMPs, especially eCATH1, may be promising candidates for alternative drugs to control R. equi in mono- and coinfections.
MESH HEADINGS: Actinomycetales Infections/*drug therapy/*microbiology/veterinary
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology
MESH HEADINGS: Cell Survival/drug effects
MESH HEADINGS: Cercopithecus aethiops
MESH HEADINGS: Circular Dichroism
MESH HEADINGS: Drug Resistance, Bacterial
MESH HEADINGS: Drug Synergism
MESH HEADINGS: Female
MESH HEADINGS: Hemolysis
MESH HEADINGS: Horse Diseases/*drug therapy/*microbiology
MESH HEADINGS: Horses
MESH HEADINGS: Liposomes/chemistry
MESH HEADINGS: Microbial Sensitivity Tests
MESH HEADINGS: Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
MESH HEADINGS: Phospholipids/chemistry
MESH HEADINGS: *Rhodococcus equi/drug effects/ultrastructure
MESH HEADINGS: Salt-Tolerance
MESH HEADINGS: Sheep
MESH HEADINGS: Vero Cells
MESH HEADINGS: alpha-Defensins/chemistry/*pharmacology eng

1197. Schmajuk, N. A. and Bushnell, P. J. A computational model reveals classical conditioning mechanisms underlying visual signal detection in rats. 2009; 82, (3): 340-351.


Rec #: 68509
Keywords: NO TOXICANT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: We applied a neural network model of classical conditioning proposed by Schmajuk et al. (1996) to visual signal detection and discrimination tasks designed to assess sustained attention in rats (Bushnell, 1999). We used a sign-tracking description of signal detection behavior by assuming that rats approach the location of the lever that they expect will be rewarded. We also assumed that although the visual signals contribute to set the occasion for the approach response to be generated, they do not become strongly associated with reward. The model accurately described Bushnell's (1999) results showing an increased proportion of hits with increasing signal intensity, decreased proportion of hits with increasing trial rate, and lower accuracy in a discrimination task compared to a detection task. In addition, observation of the behavior of rats performing the task confirmed assumptions and predictions of the model: (a) rats learn to approach the location of the lever they expect to be rewarded; (b) during the pre-signal interval, rats approach the location of the blank lever because it matches the intensity of the light they experience during that interval; and (c) the rats' behavior is directed to the location of the levers and not towards the light, which acts only as an "occasion setter" for the lever to be selected and pressed. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Signal detection, Classical conditioning, Model, Operant conditioning,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 522TP

1198. Schmidlin, O.; Tanaka, M.; Sebastian, A., and Morris, R. C. Jr. Selective Chloride Loading Is Pressor in the Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Despite Hydrochlorothiazide-Induced Natriuresis.


Rec #: 50679
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: COMMENTS: Cites: Hypertension. 2007 Dec;50(6):1085-92 (medline /17938378)
COMMENTS: Cites: J Hypertens. 1988 Aug;6(8):613-7 (medline /3183367)
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ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP), the pressor effect of selective dietary chloride loading depends on a positive external sodium balance.
ABSTRACT: METHODS: In 43 male SHRSP fed a Japanese style diet containing a low normal amount of NaCl (0.4%), we compared the effects on telemetrically measured SBP of hydrochlorothiazide, 25 mg/kg per day, alone ('TZ', n = 11); hydrochlorothiazide combined with either KCl ('KCLTZ', 2%K, n = 10) or KHCO3 ('KBCTZ', 2%K, n = 11) and no hydrochlorothiazide ('CTL', n = 11) over a 10-week period starting at 10 weeks of age.
ABSTRACT: RESULTS: With either TZ or KBCTZ, SBP did not increase above baseline values. However, KCLTZ induced a sustained increase in SBP of 17 mmHg (P < 0.0001), an increase almost half of that occurring without hydrochlorothiazide (CTL), 38 mmHg (P < 0.0001). Such divergence of blood pressures with KCLTZ and KBCTZ began over the first 3 days of their administration, even while they induced similarly negative external sodium balances, a positive one occurring only in CTL. Body weight increased more without, than with, hydrochlorothiazide, but did not differ between KCLTZ and KBCTZ. Changes in SBP occurring on day 2 after treatment assignment predicted final changes.
ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that in the SHRSP, dietary KCl loading can induce a pressor effect despite concomitant hydrochlorothiazide-induced natriuresis that elicits a negative external sodium balance. The results provide evidence that in the SHRSP the pressor effect of selective chloride loading does not depend on a positive external sodium balance, but rather on a mechanism actuated by chloride per se.
MESH HEADINGS: Animal Feed/analysis
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: Blood Pressure/*drug effects/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
MESH HEADINGS: Chlorides/*metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Diuretics/*pharmacology
MESH HEADINGS: Drug Therapy, Combination
MESH HEADINGS: Hydrochlorothiazide/*pharmacology
MESH HEADINGS: Hypertension/*chemically induced/drug therapy/physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Male
MESH HEADINGS: Natriuresis/*drug effects/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Potassium Chloride/administration &
MESH HEADINGS: dosage
MESH HEADINGS: Rats
MESH HEADINGS: Rats, Inbred SHR
MESH HEADINGS: Sodium/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Sodium, Dietary/administration &
MESH HEADINGS: dosage
MESH HEADINGS: Telemetry
MESH HEADINGS: Water-Electrolyte Balance/drug effects/physiology eng

1199. Schmieder, R. E.; Philipp, T.; Guerediaga, J.; Gorostidi, M.; Bush, C., and Keefe, D. L. Aliskiren-Based Therapy Lowers Blood Pressure More Effectively Than Hydrochlorothiazide-Based Therapy in Obese Patients With Hypertension: Sub-Analysis of a 52-Week, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial.


Rec #: 50849
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To compare the long-term efficacy, safety and tolerability of the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren against the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) in obese patients with hypertension.
ABSTRACT: METHODS: A post hoc analysis of 396 obese patients (body mass index > or = 30 kg/m2) in a 52-week study in 1124 patients with hypertension was performed. Patients were randomized to receive aliskiren 150 mg or HCTZ 12.5 mg for 3 weeks, or placebo for 6 weeks. At week 3, active treatment doses were doubled. Patients receiving placebo were randomized to aliskiren 300 mg or HCTZ 25 mg at week 6. Add-on amlodipine 5-10 mg was permitted from week 12 to achieve blood pressure (BP) control ( < 140/90 mmHg).
ABSTRACT: RESULTS: In the subgroup of obese patients, aliskiren monotherapy provided significantly greater BP reductions than HCTZ at week 12 endpoint (-16.7/-12.3 vs. -12.2/-9.1 mmHg, P < or = 0.001). Reductions were also greater with aliskiren-based therapy than HCTZ-based therapy at week 52 endpoint (-19.9/-15.5 vs. -17.5/-13.3 mmHg; P = 0.138 for systolic BP and P = 0.007 for diastolic BP). Mean BP reductions from baseline with aliskiren-based therapy were similar in obese and nonobese patients. By contrast, HCTZ-based therapy provided significantly smaller mean reductions in BP from baseline in obese patients vs. nonobese patients (P < 0.05). Aliskiren-based therapy was generally well tolerated in obese patients, and was associated with a significantly lower incidence of hypokalemia (1.0 vs. 14.0%, P < 0.0001) than HCTZ-based therapy.
ABSTRACT: CONCLUSION: Aliskiren-based therapy provided superior BP reductions to HCTZ-based therapy with good tolerability in obese patients with hypertension.
MESH HEADINGS: Amides/adverse effects/*therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Antihypertensive Agents/adverse effects/*therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Double-Blind Method
MESH HEADINGS: Fumarates/adverse effects/*therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Hydrochlorothiazide/*therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Hypertension/complications/*drug therapy
MESH HEADINGS: Obesity/*complications
MESH HEADINGS: Placebos eng

1200. Schopfer, L. M.; Furlong, C. E., and Lockridge, O. Development of diagnostics in the search for an explanation of aerotoxic syndrome. 2010; 404, (1): 64-74.


Rec #: 68519
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Aerotoxic syndrome is assumed to be caused by exposure to tricresyl phosphate, an additive in engine lubricants and hydraulic fluids that is activated to the toxic 2-(ortho-cresyl)-4H-1,3,2-benzodioxaphosphoran-2-one (CBDP). Currently, there is no laboratory evidence to support intoxication of airline crew members by CBDP. Our goal was to develop methods for testing in vivo exposure by identifying and characterizing biomarkers. Mass spectrometry was used to study the reaction of CBDP with human albumin, free tyrosine, and human butyrylcholinesterase. Human albumin made a covalent bond with CBDP, adding a mass of 170 amu to Tyr411 to yield the o-cresyl phosphotyrosine derivative. Human butyrylcholinesterase made a covalent bond with CBDP on Ser198 to yield five adducts with added masses of 80, 108, 156, 170, and 186 amu. The most abundant adduct had an added mass of 80 amu from phosphate (HPO(3)), a surprising result given that no pesticide or nerve agent is known to yield phosphorylated serine with an added mass of 80 amu. The next most abundant adduct had an added mass of 170 amu to form o-cresyl phosphoserine. It is concluded that toxic gases or oil mists in cabin air may form adducts on plasma butyrylcholinesterase and albumin, detectable by mass spectrometry. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keywords: CBDP, Butyrylcholinesterase, Serum albumin, Tyrosine, Organophosphorus
ISI Document Delivery No.: 624FX

1201. Schopfer, L. M.; Grigoryan, H.; Li, B.; Nachon, F.; Masson, P., and Lockridge, O. Mass spectral characterization of organophosphate-labeled, tyrosine-containing peptides: Characteristic mass fragments and a new binding motif for organophosphates. 2010; 878, (17-18): 1297-1311.


Rec #: 68529
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: We have identified organophosphorus agent (OP)-tyrosine adducts on 12 different proteins labeled with six different OP. Labeling was achieved by treating pure proteins with up to 40-fold molar excess of OP at pH 8-8.6. OP-treated proteins were digested with trypsin, and peptides were separated by HPLC. Fragmentation patterns for 100 OP-peptides labeled on tyrosine were determined in the mass spectrometer. The goals of the present work were (1) to determine the common features of the OP-reactive tyrosines, and (2) to describe non-sequence MSMS fragments characteristic of OP-tyrosine peptides. Characteristic ions at 272 and 244 amu for tyrosine-OP immonium ions were nearly always present in the MSMS spectrum of peptides labeled on tyrosine by chlorpyrifos-oxon. Characteristic fragments also appeared from the parent ions that had been labeled with diisopropylfluorophosphate (216 amu), satin (214 amu), soman (214 amu) or FP-biotin (227, 312, 329, 691 and 708 amu). In contrast to OP-reactive serines, which lie in the consensus sequence GXSXG, the OP-reactive tyrosines have no consensus sequence. Their common feature is the presence of nearby positively charged residues that activate the phenolic hydroxyl group. The significance of these findings is the recognition of a new binding motif for OP to proteins that have no active site serine. Modified peptides are difficult to find when the OP bears no radiolabel and no tag. The characteristic MSMS fragment ions are valuable because they are identifiers for OP-tyrosine, independent of the peptide. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Tyrosine, Organophosphorus, Covalent bond, Mass spectrometry,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 601RU

1202. Schulz, R. Field Studies on Exposure, Effects, and Risk Mitigation of Aquatic Nonpoint-Source Insecticide Pollution: A Review. 2004; 33, 419-448.


Rec #: 1300
Keywords: REFS CHECKED,REVIEW
Call Number: NO REFS CHECKED (ADC,AZ,CBF,CBL,CPY,CYF,CYP,DCF,DDVP,DM,DMT,DS,DZ,ES,FNT,FNV,MDT,MLN,MP,OML,OXD,PMR,TBC,TBO,TCF), NO REVIEW (ADC,AZ,CBF,CBL,CPY,CYF,CYP,DCF,DDVP,DM,DMT,DS,DZ,ES,FNT,FNV,MDT,MLN,MP,OML,OXD,PMR,TBC,TBO,TCF)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: ADC,AZ,CBF,CBL,CPY,CYF,CYP,DCF,DDVP,DLD,DM,DMT,DS,DZ,EPRN,ES,ETN,FNF,FNT,FNTH,FNV,HCCH,MDT,MLN,MP,OML,OXD,PIM,PMR,PPCP,PRN,TBC,TBO,TCF,TXP

1203. Scognamiglio, Viviana; Pezzotti, Italo; Pezzotti, Gianni; Cano, Juan; Manfredonia, Ivano; Buonasera, Katia; Arduini, Fabiana; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe, and Giardi, Maria Teresa. Towards an integrated biosensor array for simultaneous and rapid multi-analysis of endocrine disrupting chemicals. 2012 Nov 2-; 751, (0): 161-170.


Rec #: 5000
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: In this paper we propose the construction and application of a portable multi-purpose biosensor array for the simultaneous detection of a wide range of endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), based on the recognition operated by various enzymes and microorganisms. The developed biosensor combines both electrochemical and optical transduction systems, in order to increase the number of chemical species which can be monitored. Considering to the maximum residue level (MRL) of contaminants established by the European Commission, the biosensor system was able to detect most of the chemicals analysed with very high sensitivity. In particular, atrazine and diuron were detected with a limit of detection of 0.5 nM, with an RSD% less than 5%; paraoxon and chlorpyrifos were revealed with a detection of 5 ++M and 4.5 ++M, respectively, with an RSD% less than 6%; catechol and bisphenol A were identified with a limit of detection of 1 ++M and 35 ++M respectively, with an RSD% less than 5%. Endocrine disrupting chemicals/ Multi-array/ Biosensor/ Amperometric/ Optical/ Integrated biosensing system

1204. Seaton, K. A. and Joyce, D. C. Effect of Postharvest Dipping in Insecticides on the Vase Life of Geraldton Waxflower. SOIL; 1996; 36, (3): 373-378.


Rec #: 1310
Keywords: IN VITRO
Call Number: NO IN VITRO (CBL,CPY,CYP,DDVP,DM,DMT,ES,FNV,PMR)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CBL,CPY,CYP,DDVP,DM,DMT,ES,FNV,PMR

1205. Seebunrueng, K.; Santaladchaiyakit, Y., and Srijaranai, S. Green extraction using catanionic surfactants of trimethyltetradecyl ammonium bromide-sodium dodecyl sulfate for preconcentration of organophosphorus pesticides in fruit samples. 2012; 4, (6): 1674-1680.


Rec #: 68539
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: An extraction method using mixed catanionic surfactants of trimethyltetradecyl ammonium bromide (TTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was developed for preconcentration of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) before analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The studied OPPs are azinphos-methyl, parathion-methyl, fenitrothion, diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and prothiophos. The optimum extraction condition was 10 mmol L(-1) SDS and 0.5 mmol L(-1) TTAB in the presence of 10% (w/v) NaCl and equilibration at room temperature. The concentrated target pesticides were subsequently analyzed using a Symmetry C8 column, gradient elution of acetonitrile and water, at a flow rate of 0.8 mL min(-1), and detection at 210 nm. Enrichment factors were found in the range of 16-30. The limits of detection of the studied OPPs were 0.001-0.01 mg L(-1) which are below the maximum residue limits (MRLs) established by the European Union. Good repeatability (n = 5) and reproducibility (n = 15) were obtained with the relative standard deviation (RSD) below 2% for retention time and below 9% for peak area, respectively. The validation of the proposed method for fruit sample analyses was carried out by matrix matched calibration. A modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) method was used for sample preparation before extraction and preconcentration. Recovery of the fortified samples at three levels (0.25, 1.50 and 2.50 mg kg(-1)) was higher than 80.9% (on average) for all studied fruit samples (pomelo and pineapple). No detectable residues of OPPs in samples were found.
Keywords: PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY, CLOUD-POINT EXTRACTION,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 952CX

1206. Seger, Mark R. Nmr Investigation of the Behavior of Chlorpyrifos and Methyl Parathion Sorbed on Clays, and Quantitative Carbon-13 Nmr Analysis of Sequence Distributions in Poly(Ethylene-Co-1-Hexene). 2008: (UMI# 3321312 ).


Rec #: 51979
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Chapters 1 and 2 (and Appendix) . Decomposition of chlorpyrifos and methyl parathion on kaolinite and various cation-exchanged montmorillonites (at room temperature, in the dark) was monitored by 31 P NMR. Decomposition products included the results of hydrolysis reactions, isomerization reactions and oxidation reactions; mineralization also appears to occur in some cases. Assignments of 31 P peaks was based mostly on literature values of chemical shifts of similar structures and 31 P NMR experiments on DMSO-d6 extracts of the pesticide/clay samples. When initially sorbed onto the clay, both pesticides appear by solid-state 31 P NMR to exhibit significant motion on the molecular level, resulting in almost liquid-like spectra. Over a period of days or weeks, the signal due to unreacted pesticide diminishes and was replaced by new 31 P NMR signals arising from various decomposition products. The rate of pesticide decomposition was found to vary greatly, depending on the cation present in montmorillonite. The fastest initial decomposition (disappearance of unreacted pesticide) occurred with the Cu 2+ -exchanged montmorillonites. Higher hydration levels of Al-exchanged montmorillonite were found to reduce the decomposition rate of methyl parathion; similarly, chlorpyrifos decomposed more quickly when sorbed on Zn-montmorillonite with lower hydration levels. Chapter 3 . Different 13 C NMR methods of determining triad distributions in two poly(ethylene-co-1-hexene) copolymers are examined using high signal-to-noise 126 MHz 13 C spectra of the copolymers dissolved in deuterated 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene at 398K. This examination includes three integration techniques, the experimental impact of decoupler sidebands and significantly non-equal 13 C nOe values. A least-squares regression analysis technique for solving for triad mole fractions is tested and appears to be more reliable than two published algebraic expressions. The resultant triad mole fractions are compared to sequence distribution parameters expected by Bernoullian and first-order Markovian statistical models. On the basis of 13 C NMR-determined average reactivity ratios, the copolymer designated sample H (5.3 mol % 1-hexene) appears to be a Bernoullian copolymer resulting from a single-site catalytic system. The copolymer designated sample L (3.6 mol % 1-hexene overall) is better described as a mixture of polyethylene and a Bernoullian copolymer with 6.4 mol % 1-hexene content.
Start Page: 317
ISSN/ISBN: 9780549716228
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: 0486:Analytical chemistry
Keywords: Sequence distributions
Keywords: Carbon-13
Keywords: Methyl parathion
Keywords: NMR
Keywords: Pure sciences
Keywords: Poly(ethylene-co-1-hexene)
Keywords: 0494:Physical chemistry
Keywords: Clays
2008
0494: Physical chemistry
Sequence distributions
Seger, Mark R.
0486: Analytical chemistry
Carbon-13
3321312
66569
n/a
40714041
Copyright ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing 2008
English
Clays
Chlorpyrifos
9780549716228
2012-07-10
1575744541
Methyl parathion
NMR
304642793
Pure sciences
Poly(ethylene-co-1-hexene) English

1207. Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K; Conoan, Nicholas H; Cox, Marc B; Sangster, Jodi L; Balsiger, Heather a; Bridges, Andrew a; Cowman, Tim; Knight, Lindsey a; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Kolok, Alan S, and Kolok, Alan S. The Anti-Estrogenic Activity of Sediments From Agriculturally Intense Watersheds: Assessment Using in Vivo and in Vitro Assays. 2011 Sep; 105, (1-2): 189-198.


Rec #: 47129
Keywords: SEDIMENT CONC
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The goal of the current study was to determine whether sediments from agriculturally intense watersheds can act as a potential source of anti-estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compounds. The specific objectives of the current study were to determine (1) whether female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) experience alterations in endocrine function when exposed to sediments collected from agriculturally intense watersheds and (2) if these sediments display anti-estrogenic activity in an in vitro assay. In addition, sediment samples were analyzed for the presence of steroid hormones and pesticides associated with local agricultural practices. To accomplish this, sediments and water were collected from three sites within two agriculturally intense Nebraska watersheds (Bow Creek and the Elkhorn River).
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