Appendix 2-5: Rejected ecotox bibliography for Chlorpyrifos



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Keywords: Lepidoptera -- virology
Keywords: Organothiophosphorus Compounds
Keywords: Aryldialkylphosphatase -- genetics
Keywords: S-(N,N-diethylaminoethyl) isobutyl methylphosphothiolate
Keywords: Lepidoptera -- genetics
Keywords: Baculoviridae -- physiology
Keywords: Hydrolysis
Keywords: EC 3.1.8.1
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Pesticides -- metabolism
Keywords: Baculoviridae -- genetics
Keywords: 0
Keywords: Kinetics
Keywords: Aryldialkylphosphatase -- biosynthesis
Keywords: Aryldialkylphosphatase -- isolation & purification
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Larva -- virology
Keywords: 50782-69-9
Keywords: Organothiophosphorus Compounds -- metabolism
Keywords: Organothiophosphorus Compounds -- chemistry
Keywords: VX
Keywords: Substrate Specificity
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos -- metabolism
Date completed - 2010-09-01
Date created - 2010-07-30
Date revised - 2012-12-20
Language of summary - English
Pages - 388-392
ProQuest ID - 749019773
Last updated - 2013-01-19
British nursing index edition - Chemico-biological interactions, September 6, 2010, 187(1-3):388-392
Corporate institution author - Otto, Tamara C; Kasten, Shane A; Kovaleva, Elena; Liu, Zhi; Buchman, George; Tolosa, Marita; Davis, David; Smith, J Richard; Balcerzak, Robert; Lenz, David E; Cerasoli, Douglas M
DOI - MEDL-20176005; 20176005; 1872-7786 eng

1007. Oulette, J. H.; Dittenber, D. A.; Kloes, P. M., and John, J. A. Chlorpyrifos: Two-Generation Reproduction Study in Fischer Rats. 1983.


Rec #: 1220
Keywords: NO SOURCE
Call Number: NO SOURCE (CPY)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY

1008. Overwijk, W. W. and Schluns, K. S. Functions of ΓC Cytokines in Immune Homeostasis: Current and Potential Clinical Applications.


Rec #: 50789
Keywords: NO TOXICANT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: Cytokines that signal through receptor complexes containing the common gamma (gammaC) chain receptor subunit are central regulators of lymphocyte homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the four major gammaC cytokines that have proven activity in or potential for immunotherapy: IL-2, IL-7, IL-15 and IL-21. Their shared and unique activities on specific lymphocyte populations suggest therapeutic applications such as enhancing lymphocyte reconstitution, expanding tumor and pathogen-specific lymphocytes, and optimizing vaccines. Because the responsiveness of individual lymphocyte subsets varies under different situations such as lymphopenia and active immune responses, understanding the dynamics of gammaC-containing receptor expression is important in deciding how to achieve the most desired effect. Current understanding of the biology of gammaC cytokines suggests several clinical applications, including their direct administration or use in generation of lymphocytes for adoptive transfer, increasing their endogenous production, and potentiating their activity by complex formation with specific antibodies or their specific receptor-alpha subunits. Overall, gammaC cytokines have great potential, through their targeted use alone or in combination, to be an integral part of clinical interventions with enhanced efficacy and decreased toxicity.
MESH HEADINGS: Animals
MESH HEADINGS: Homeostasis/*drug effects/*immunology
MESH HEADINGS: Interleukin-15/metabolism/pharmacology/therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Interleukin-2/metabolism/pharmacology/therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Interleukin-7/metabolism/pharmacology/therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Interleukins/metabolism/*pharmacology/therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Models, Biological
MESH HEADINGS: Receptors, Interleukin/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: T-Lymphocytes/drug effects/immunology/metabolism eng

1009. Ozbey, A. and Uygun, U. Behaviour of some organophosphorus pesticide residues in peppermint tea during the infusion process. 2007; 104, (1): 237-241.


Rec #: 66399
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: In order to investigate dissipation behaviour of malathion, fenitrothion, dimethoate, chlorpyrifos and pirimiphos-ethyl during the infusion process, pesticide-free dried peppermint leaves were spiked with the pesticides. Infusions were prepared according to the usual process of infusion preparation. The effect of the infusion process on the transfer of the pesticides from the spiked peppermint leaves into brew was examined at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. Residues were determined using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionisation detector (FID). The decrease in pesticide levels during infusion was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Transfer of residues decreased significantly with infusion time. The carryover of the residues of dimethoate, which has the highest water solubility, into the infusion was the highest. Satisfactory relationships were found between water-solubility (Ws), partition coefficient (K(ow)) and Henry's law constant (H) of the pesticides with the transfer of pesticides to brewed tea. It was observed that not only water solubility or K(ow) but also H controls the dissipation of the pesticides from water or their air-water partitioning. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: malathion, fenitrothion, dimethoate, chlorpyrifos, pirimiphos-ethyl,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 169ZL

1010. ---. Behaviour of some organophosphorus pesticide residues in thyme and stinging nettle tea during infusion process. 2007; 42, (3): 380-383.


Rec #: 66409
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: In order to investigate dissipation behaviour of fenitrothion, dimethoate, chlorpyrifos and pirimiphos-ethyl during infusion process, pesticide-free dried thyme and stinging nettle leaves were spiked with the pesticides. Infusions were prepared according to the usual process of infusion preparation. The effect of infusion process on the transfer of the pesticides from the spiked herbs leaves into brew was examined at intervals of 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. Residues were determined using gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector. The decrease in pesticide levels during infusion was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Transfer of residues decreased considerably with infusion time. The carryover of the residues of dimethoate, which has the highest water solubility, into the infusions was the greatest. Satisfactory relationships were found between water solubility (W(S)) and partition coefficient (K(OW)) of the pesticides with the transfer of pesticides to brewed teas.
Keywords: chlorpyrifos, dimethoate, fenitrothion, nettle, pirimiphos-ethyl, thyme
ISI Document Delivery No.: 139FH

1011. Ozturk, L.; Izdes, S.; Kesimci, E.; Balikci, A. A., and Kanbak, O. Insecticide Contamination as a Cause of Food Related Illness.


Rec #: 79319
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: MESH HEADINGS: Chlorpyrifos/*poisoning
MESH HEADINGS: Cholinesterase Inhibitors/poisoning
MESH HEADINGS: Flour
MESH HEADINGS: Follow-Up Studies
MESH HEADINGS: Food Contamination
MESH HEADINGS: Foodborne Diseases/epidemiology/*etiology
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Insecticides/*poisoning eng

1012. Pait, a S; Whitall; Jeffrey, Cfg; Caldow, C; Mason, Al; Lauenstein, G G; Christensen, J D, and Pait, A S. Chemical Contamination in Southwest Puerto Rico: an Assessment of Organic Contaminants in Nearshore Sediments. 2008 Mar; 56, (3): 580-587.


Rec #: 49709
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Keywords: Water Pollution
Keywords: Sediment chemistry
Keywords: Sediment pollution
Keywords: Marine Environment
Keywords: Contamination
Keywords: Oceanic Abstracts; ASFA 3: Aquatic Pollution & Environmental Quality; Aqualine Abstracts; Water Resources Abstracts
Keywords: Sediments
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Assessments
Keywords: Marine pollution
Keywords: ASW, Caribbean Sea, Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico
Keywords: Sediment Contamination
Keywords: Organic Compounds
Keywords: Chemical pollution
Keywords: Contaminants
Date revised - 2008-06-01
Language of summary - English
Location - ASW, Caribbean Sea, Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico
Pages - 580-587
ProQuest ID - 289976444
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Sediment Contamination; Water Pollution; Assessments; Organic Compounds; Marine Environment; ASW, Caribbean Sea, Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico; Contaminants; Contamination; Sediments; Sediment pollution; Chemical pollution; Sediment chemistry; Marine pollution
Last updated - 2011-11-02
Corporate institution author - Pait, A S; Whitall; Jeffrey, CFG; Caldow, C; Mason, AL; Lauenstein, G G; Christensen, J D
DOI - OB-MD-0008083964; 8185409; 0025-326X English

1013. Pait, Anthony S; Whitall, David R; Dieppa, Angel; Newton, Sarah E; Brune, Lia; Caldow, Chris; Mason, Andrew L; Apeti, Dennis a; Christensen, John D, and Pait, Anthony S. Characterization of Organic Chemical Contaminants in Sediments From Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico. 2012 Aug; 184, (8): 5065-5075.


Rec #: 46559
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Jobos Bay, located on the southeastern coast of Puerto Rico, contains a variety of habitats including mangroves, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs. The watershed surrounding the bay includes a number of towns, agricultural areas, and the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR). Jobos Bay and the surrounding watershed are part of a Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), involving the Jobos Bay NERR, the US Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to assess the benefits of agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on the terrestrial and marine environments. As part of the Jobos Bay CEAP, NOAA collected sediment samples in May 2008 to characterize over 130 organic chemical contaminants. This paper presents the results of the organic contaminant analysis. The organic contaminants detected in the sediments included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls, and the pesticide DDT. PAHs at one site in the inner bay near a boat yard were significantly elevated; however, all organic contaminant classes measured were below NOAA sediment quality guidelines that would have indicated that impacts were likely. The results of this work provide an important baseline assessment of the marine environment that will assist in understanding the benefits of implementing BMPs on water quality in Jobos Bay.
Keywords: Sediment chemistry
Keywords: Pollution monitoring
Keywords: Marine
Keywords: Sediment pollution
Keywords: Resource management
Keywords: P 0000:AIR POLLUTION
Keywords: M3 1010:Issues in Sustainable Development
Keywords: Best practices
Keywords: Q5 01502:Methods and instruments
Keywords: Freshwater
Keywords: Watersheds
Keywords: Water quality
Keywords: Pollution Abstracts; Environment Abstracts; Oceanic Abstracts; ASFA 3: Aquatic Pollution & Environmental Quality; Sustainability Science Abstracts
Keywords: Sediments
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: ASW, Caribbean Sea, Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico
Keywords: Marine environment
Keywords: Coral reefs
Keywords: Conservation
Keywords: Aromatic hydrocarbons
Keywords: Sea grass
Keywords: Chemical pollution
Keywords: River basin management
Keywords: ENA 01:Air Pollution
Date revised - 2012-11-01
Language of summary - English
Location - ASW, Caribbean Sea, Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico
Pages - 5065-5075
ProQuest ID - 1223039157
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Sediment chemistry; Sediment pollution; Resource management; Coral reefs; Aromatic hydrocarbons; Sea grass; Water quality; Watersheds; River basin management; Pollution monitoring; Marine environment; Best practices; Conservation; Chemical pollution; Sediments; ASW, Caribbean Sea, Greater Antilles, Puerto Rico; Marine; Freshwater
Last updated - 2012-12-06
Corporate institution author - Pait, Anthony S; Whitall, David R; Dieppa, Angel; Newton, Sarah E; Brune, Lia; Caldow, Chris; Mason, Andrew L; Apeti, Dennis A; Christensen, John D
DOI - OB-5e9937d5-2332-436f-b28cmfgefd101; 16897984; CS1252162; 0167-6369; 1573-2959 English

1014. Palanikumar, L.; Kumaraguru, A. K.; Ramakritinan, C. M., and Anand, M. Genotoxic assessment of anthracene and benzo a pyrene to milkfish Chanos chanos. 2012; 94, (2): 350-363.


Rec #: 66469
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Mutagenic and genotoxic effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, anthracene and benzo [a] pyrene (BaP), in milkfish Chanos chanos were determined using micronucleus (MN) test and comet assay (CA). Distinct mean frequencies of nuclear abnormalities such as MNs; binucleated micronuclei, nuclear bud, and fragmented apoptotic cells were measured. Significant increase in DNA damage with five classes of damage level was observed and expressed in terms of arbitrary unit (AU). Mean frequencies of total nuclear abnormalities were 0.5 perpendicular to 0.25 cells in control; 0.67 +/- 0.33 cells in solvent control; 70 +/- 9.60 cells in 0.176 mg L(-1) anthracene, and 91.83 +/- 6.25 cells in 0.031 mg L(-1) BaP. The greatest DNA damage of 170AU was observed in 0.176 mg L(-1) anthracene-exposed group and 182AU was observed in 0.031 mg L(-1) BaP-treated fish. This study confirmed that the CA and MN assays are useful tools in determining potential genotoxicity of water pollutants and might be appropriate as a part of monitoring program.
Keywords: anthracene, benzo [a] pyrene, Chanos chanos, comet assay, DNA damage and
ISI Document Delivery No.: 923CV

1015. Palma, Patricia; Alvarenga, Paula; Palma, Vera; Matos, Claudia; Fernandes, Rosa Maria; Soares, Amadeu; Barbosa, Isabel Rita, and Palma, Patricia. Evaluation of Surface Water Quality Using an Ecotoxicological Approach: a Case Study of the Alqueva Reservoir (Portugal). 2010 Mar; 17, (3): 703-716.


Rec #: 44179
Keywords: EFFLUENT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Background, aim, and scope: Freshwater reservoirs can be impacted by several hazardous substances through inputs from agricultural activity, sewage discharges, and groundwater leaching and runoff. The water quality assessment is very important for implementation of the monitoring and remediation programs to minimize the risk promoted by hazardous substances in aquatic ecosystems. Evaluation of the degree of contamination of aquatic environments must not take in account only its chemical characterization but it must be complemented with biological assays, which determine potential toxic effects and allows an integrated evaluation of its effects in populations and aquatic ecosystem communities. The application of this type of strategy has clear advantages allowing a general evaluation of the effects from all the water components, including those due to unknown substances and synergic, antagonistic, or additive effects. There are only a few studies that reported ecotoxicological acute end points, for the assessment of surface water quality, and the relationship among toxicity results and the anthropogenic pollution sources and the seasonal period. The aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicological characterization of the surface water from Alqueva reservoir (South of Portugal) and to evaluate the influence of anthropogenic sources of pollution and their seasonal variation in its toxicity. The construction of Alqueva reservoir was recently finished (2002) and, to our knowledge, an ecotoxicological assessment of its surface water has not been performed. Because of that, no information is available on the possible impact of pollutants on the biota. The surface water toxicity was assessed using acute and chronic bioassays. The results are to be used for developing a monitoring program, including biological methods. Materials and methods: Water samples were collected during 2006-2007, at each of the nine sampling sites selected in Alqueva reservoir. These sampling points allow an assessment at the upstream (Sra. Ajuda, Alcarrache, Alamos-Captacao), at the middle (Alqueva-Montante, Alqueva-Mourao, Lucefecit), and at the downstream of the water line (Alqueva-Jusante; Ardila-confluencia; Moinho das Barcas). The campaigns occurred in February, March, May, July, September, and November of 2006 and February, March, and May of 2007. The rainy season comprised November, February, and March, and the dry season included May, July, and September. A total of 81 samples were collected during the study period. The physical-chemical parameters were analyzed following standard and recommended methods of analysis (APHA et al. 1998). The pesticide analyses were performed using gas chromatography according to DIN EN ISO 6468 (1996). Surface water ecotoxicity was evaluated using the following bioassays: Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition, Thamnocephalus platyurus mortality, and
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