Appendix 2-5: Rejected ecotox bibliography for Chlorpyrifos



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diazinon, isoxathion, malathion, and tolclofos-methyl) adsorbed on powdered activated carbon (PAC). Following adsorption of each pesticide on 10mg/L of PAC in water, chlorine was added. After 30min of chlorination, the corresponding oxons were detected in the water, but the parent compounds were not detected. Molar ratios of the oxon concentration in solution after 30min of chlorine addition to the initial pesticide concentration before the adsorption process were 4.1% and 7.9% for diazinon, 3.9% and 5.8% for isoxathion, 1.2% and 1.7% for malathion, and 1.4% and 1.4% for tolchlofos-methyl, in the case of 2 and 5 mg/L of chlorine addition. The results suggested that the oxons were desorbed from the PAC by chlorination. The concentrations of the desorbed oxons gradually decreased with time, apparently owing to their readsorption by the PAC. Results from additional experiments suggest the following sequence of events: (i) adsorbed pesticides are oxidized by chlorine on the surface of the PAC and transformed into corresponding oxons; (ii) the oxons are released from the PAC; (iii) the released oxons are gradually readsorbed by the PAC, decreasing their concentrations in the water phase. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: activated carbon, chlorination, organophosphorus pesticides, oxon
ISI Document Delivery No.: 291BF

982. Ojha, Anupama; Srivastava, Nalini, and Ojha, Anupama. Redox Imbalance in Rat Tissues Exposed With Organophosphate Pesticides and Therapeutic Potential of Antioxidant Vitamins. 2012 Jan 1; 75, 230-241.


Rec #: 42899
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Organophosphate pesticides are among the most widely used synthetic chemicals for controlling domestic and agricultural pests. Present study was aimed to evaluate the potential of chlorpyrifos, parathion and malathion, to disturb glutathione homeostasis in rat tissues and to find out whether the pre-feeding of antioxidant vitamins has some ameliorating effect on the pesticide-induced alterations. The results showed that these pesticides, alone or in combination, caused decrease in the levels of GSH and the corresponding increase in the levels of GSSG, decreasing the GSH/GSSG ratio. The results also showed NADPH/NADP+ and NADH/NAD+ ratios were also decreased in the rat tissues on pesticide exposure. These pesticides, alone or in combination, caused increase in the activities of glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in all the rat tissues studied. The findings show that these pesticides generate oxidative stress and prior feeding of mixture of antioxidant vitamins tend to reduce the toxicities of these pesticides.
Keywords: Chemicals
Keywords: glutathione reductase
Keywords: Pesticides (organophosphorus)
Keywords: Feeding
Keywords: Tissues
Keywords: Environment Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Antioxidants
Keywords: Organophosphates
Keywords: NADH
Keywords: Toxicity
Keywords: Homeostasis
Keywords: Malathion
Keywords: ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety
Keywords: NADP
Keywords: Glucosephosphate dehydrogenase
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: vitamins
Keywords: Oxidative stress
Keywords: Vitamins
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Pests
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Parathion
Date revised - 2011-12-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 230-241
ProQuest ID - 911152195
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - glutathione reductase; Pesticides (organophosphorus); Feeding; Antioxidants; NADH; Toxicity; Homeostasis; Malathion; Glucosephosphate dehydrogenase; NADP; Chlorpyrifos; Oxidative stress; Vitamins; Pests; Parathion; Chemicals; Tissues; vitamins; Organophosphates; Pesticides
Last updated - 2012-03-29
British nursing index edition - Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety [Ecotoxicol. Environ. Saf.]. Vol. 75, pp. 230-241. 1 Jan 2012.
Corporate institution author - Ojha, Anupama; Srivastava, Nalini
DOI - 7d48e646-add1-4232-aa92csamfg201; 16000871; 0147-6513 English

983. Ojha, Anupama; Yaduvanshi, Santosh K., and Srivastava, Nalini. Effect of combined exposure of commonly used organophosphate pesticides on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in rat tissues. 2011 Feb; 99, (2): 148-156.


Rec #: 2780
Keywords: IN VITRO
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Organophosphate compounds are among the most widely used synthetic chemicals for controlling a wide variety of pests. Organophosphate (OP) poisoning continues to be major cause of morbidity and mortality in the third world countries. Indiscriminate use of these pesticides tends to leave residues on the objects of the environment. Present study is aimed to compare the potential of three commonly used OP pesticides, chlorpyrifos (CPF), methyl parathion (MPT) and malathion (MLT), to generate oxidative stress in rat tissues and to evaluate whether the combined exposure of these pesticides exerts synergistic or antagonistic effects. Results of the present study showed that CPF, MPT and MLT exposure to rats caused accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonanal (4HNE), the two major end products of lipid peroxidation, in liver, kidney, brain and spleen of rats. Combined exposure of these pesticides also resulted in accumulation of MDA and 4HNE in rat tissues but the increase was almost of the same order as observed in rat tissues given these pesticides singly. Exposure with CPF, MPT and MLT singly or in mixture, caused dose-dependent decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), in rat tissues when compared with control, and the decrease observed was of the same order in all the groups. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, an indicator of OP poisoning, was also decreased in rat tissues in dose-dependent manner in CPF, MPT, MLT and mixture treated group. Differential increase in the levels of cytochrome P450 (cyt P450) in hepatic and extra-hepatic tissues of rats given CPF, MPT or MLT singly or in mixture, indicate different rates of metabolism of these pesticides. Results of the present study clearly show that CPF, MPT and MLT exposure singly or in mixture, induced oxidative stress in rat tissues which may be the major contributor of the overall toxicity of the OP pesticides. Combined exposure of these pesticides does not seem to potentiate the toxicity of each other and their toxic effects are not additive. Chlorpyrifos/ Parathion/ Malathion/ Oxidative stress/ Lipid peroxidation/ Antioxidant enzymes

984. Olea, C.; Boon, E. M.; Pellicena, P.; Kuriyan, J., and Marletta, M. A. Probing the Function of Heme Distortion in the H-Nox Family.


Rec #: 51049
Keywords: NO TOXICANT
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: Hemoproteins carry out diverse functions utilizing a wide range of chemical reactivity while employing the same heme prosthetic group. It is clear from high-resolution crystal structures and biochemical studies that protein-bound hemes are not planar and adopt diverse conformations. The crystal structure of an H-NOX domain from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (Tt H-NOX) contains the most distorted heme reported to date. In this study, Tt H-NOX was engineered to adopt a flatter heme by mutating proline 115, a conserved residue in the H-NOX family, to alanine. Decreasing heme distortion in Tt H-NOX increases affinity for oxygen and decreases the reduction potential of the heme iron. Additionally, flattening the heme is associated with significant shifts in the N-terminus of the protein. These results show a clear link between the heme conformation and Tt H-NOX structure and demonstrate that heme distortion is an important determinant for maintaining biochemical properties in H-NOX proteins.
MESH HEADINGS: Bacterial Proteins/chemistry
MESH HEADINGS: Heme/*chemistry
MESH HEADINGS: Hemeproteins/*chemistry/genetics
MESH HEADINGS: Molecular Conformation
MESH HEADINGS: Mutagenesis, Site-Directed
MESH HEADINGS: Oxygen/metabolism
MESH HEADINGS: Protein Binding
MESH HEADINGS: Protein Conformation
MESH HEADINGS: Thermoanaerobacter/*chemistry eng

985. Oliveira, M. M.; Silva, M. V.; Bastos, Vlfc; Fernandes, F. C., and Bastos, J. C. Brain acetylcholinesterase as a marine pesticide biomarker using Brazilian fishes. 2007; 63, (4): 303-312.


Rec #: 66119
Keywords: SURVEY
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) of some fishes from the coast of Rio de Janeiro State was studied as a possible pesticide biomarker in marine environmental monitoring. AChE specific activity in brain varied from 145 to 530U/g of proteins and the Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)) for acetylthiocholine varied from 104 to 291 mu M among the 20 species studied. The enzyme sensitivity to methyl paraoxon, evaluated by the inhibition kinetic constants, shows that some species (Paralonchurus brasiliensis and Genidens genidens) are more sensitive (IC50-30min = 455 and 468 nM, respectively). The less sensitive Merluccius hubbsi and Percophis brasiliensis (IC50-30 min = 3339 and 3259nM, respectively) belong to the super-order Paracanthopterygii, which includes the more ancient species. On the other hand, more susceptible species belong to the super-order Acanthopterygii, which includes more recent species. These results suggest a possible evolutionary linkage for AChE sensitivity to methyl paraoxon. The application of inhibition kinetic constants for fish brain AChE in phylogenetic studies is still being investigated. The results have shown that a fish sentinel species should have the highest brain AChE level among the more sensitive ones. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: acetylcholinesterase, organophosphate, pollutant, biomarker
ISI Document Delivery No.: 157EG

986. Oliver, D. P.; Kookana, R. S.; Anderson, J. S.; Cox, J.; Waller, N., and Smith, L. The off-site transport of pesticide loads from two land uses in relation to hydrological events in the Mt. Lofty Ranges, South Australia. 2012; 106, 70-77.


Rec #: 66129
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: In the Mediterranean climate of this study the growing period (and hence spraying period) for horticultural crops usually occurs from late spring to summer (i.e. October-March). However, runoff predominantly occurs in winter (late April-October) since there is insufficient rain in the spring and summer period for runoff to occur. It is therefore important to establish the runoff potential of pesticide, despite the long contact time with soil. We studied the distribution of the loads transported during individual runoff events, and the proportion of total annual load transported in each event over three seasons. Some insecticides and fungicides (pirimicarb, procymidone, carbaryl, fenarimol and penconazole) transported off-site from and apple and cherry orchard over a period of 30 months showed a strong association between peak pesticide load and peak flow during individual flow events. Others (particularly chlorpyrifos) however showed no obvious relationship between flow and load transported off-site. Throughout the year certain pesticides demonstrated behaviour characteristic of those chemicals that move in the first flush of drainage water in the season. This was particularly evident for pirimicarb, bupirimate, carbaryl and fenarimol, which all have K(oc) values < 1000 L/kg. However, for other pesticides the percentage of total annual load transported off-site either increased or remained fairly constant for several runoff events during the season which was most obvious for chlorpyrifos followed by penconazole and procymidone - all with Koc values >= 1500 L/kg. Generally, the total amount of pesticide moving off-site from both orchards was < 0.5% of the total mass of active ingredient applied, except fenarimol (0.54-2.1%). Only chlorpyrifos, however, showed a positive linear relationship between the load transported off-site during an event and total rainfall (R(2) = 0.48, n = 26). The results from this study have implications for the development of management strategies to minimise pesticide transport to waterways. Crown Copyright 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Water quality, Pesticide transport, Management, Mediterranean climate
ISI Document Delivery No.: 929PO

987. Oliver, D. P.; Kookana, R. S.; Anderson, J. S.; Cox, J. W.; Fleming, N.; Wallerd, N., and Smith, L. Off-site transport of pesticides from two horticultural land uses in the Mt. Lofty Ranges, South Australia. 2012; 106, 60-69.


Rec #: 66139
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Local runoff from the catchments in the Mt. Lofty Ranges provides a major source of drinking water for the city of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. In this study two major land uses (apples and cherries) in the Mt. Lofty Ranges were monitored for off-site transport of pesticides over approximately 30 months. While fungicides have been rarely reported in the literature to be present in surface water, in our studies several fungicides (fenarimol, bupirimate, penconazole, procymidone, propiconazole) were found to be transported off-site in a persistent manner over the study period. Two pesticides (chlorpyrifos and fenari-mol) from the apple orchard were of particular concern. The average chlorpyrifos concentrations in 2007 and 2009 were more than ten times the environmental guideline value (0.01 mu g/L), suggesting potential deleterious effects on aquatic organisms immediately downstream of the apple orchard. Fenarimol was detected in 19 water samples collected from early April to early June 2007 and in 95% of these cases the total concentration exceeded the Australian Drinking Water Quality Guideline (no environmental guidelines are available in Australia for this chemical). For pesticides such as chlorpyrifos and fenarimol at least a ten-fold dilution would be required in the receiving environment for the concentrations to be below current guideline values. Generally more pesticides were detected in drainage water leaving the apple orchard than the cherry orchard, reflecting higher pesticide use at the former. The results from this study indicate that pesticides are of concern in this catchment and strategies for minimising off-site transport need to be developed and evaluated. Data from this study show that while some pesticides move off-site predominantly with the first runoff event some pesticides continue to be transported off-site for months. Some pesticides in the Mt. Lofty Ranges are persisting in soils or on the crop canopy for considerable time periods and being detected in surface runoff water months after the last application. Crown Copyright (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Water quality, Pesticide transport, Management
ISI Document Delivery No.: 929PO

988. Oliver, D. P.; Kookana, R. S.; Anderson, J. S.; Cox, J. W.; Waller, N., and Smith, L. H. Off-site transport of pesticides in dissolved and particulate forms from two land uses in the Mt. Lofty Ranges, South Australia. 2012; 106, 78-85.


Rec #: 66149
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The form in which pesticides are transported off-site can have implications for their bioavailability, ecotoxicological impact and the effectiveness of any management strategies implemented to minimise their movement. We have investigated the form in which nine pesticides (carbaryl, fenarimol, azinphos methyl, penconazole, pirimicarb, chlorpyrifos. propiconazole, procymidone and bupirimate) were transported in surface water from an apple and cherry orchard in the Mt. Lofty Ranges, South Australia, over three years. The majority of pesticides monitored were found to move off-site in the dissolved (< 1.2 mu m) phase. Only propiconazole moved off-site predominantly (70-90%) by colloidal transport in association with particulate (> 1.2 mu m) material. Chlorpyrifos was detected in surface drainage water for several months and the predominant phase in which it moved varied between events in a year and during an event. The effectiveness of pesticide physicochemical properties as surrogates for predicting mode of transport of pesticides, in this region was determined by regression of average proportion (%) of each pesticide in the dissolved phase for each event against the relevant physicochemical parameters. There was no relationship between average proportion in the dissolved phase (< 1.2 mu m) and any of the pesticide characteristics considered. This suggests that off-site transport of pesticides is governed by complex biological and hydrological interactions and the use of simple physicochemical properties as surrogates for predicting offsite transport may not be applicable. These results have implications for the effectiveness of management strategies, including buffer strips and sedimentation ponds, to minimise transport and suggest that, unless adequate residency time is available for sorption of the pesticides, these strategies may have limited use for minimising the transport of the pesticides used in the two land uses studied here. This study has highlighted the importance of understanding the mode of transport of pesticides for informing the choice of management strategies to minimise potential offsite transport of pesticides under different field conditions. Crown Copyright (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Pesticide, Surface water, Off-site transport, Transport mode
ISI Document Delivery No.: 929PO

989. Oliver, Danielle P.; Pan, Yi Fong; Anderson, Jenny S.; Lin, Tsair Fuh; Kookana, Rai S.; Douglas, Grant B., and Wendling, Laura A. Sorption of pesticides by a mineral sand mining by-product, neutralised used acid (NUA). 2013 Jan 1-; 442, (0): 255-262.


Rec #: 3010
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: This study investigated the sorptionÇôdesorption behaviour of four pesticides by a by-product from mineral sand mining, commonly referred to as neutralised used acid (NUA). In batch studies the average amount of pesticide removed after 6 h was 69% for atrazine, 89% for diuron, 61% for 2,4-D and 83% for chlorpyrifos. The lower sorption of 2,4-D to NUA compared with the other pesticides studied is most likely to be due to the high pH of the solutions (7.8 to 8.8) which would have resulted in 2,4-D being predominantly in an anionic form. The presence of other pesticides only significantly decreased the amount of 2,4-D sorbed from 59% to 34% when present in a mixture. Little (2 to 17%) diuron, chlorpyrifos, atrazine or 2,4-D were found to desorb from the NUA. The presence of nitrate or phosphate had minimal effect on the amount of diuron or atrazine sorbed to the NUA. However, all phosphate and nitrate treatments significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the amount of 2,4-D sorbed (< 50%) compared with when 2,4-D was present alone (65%). This study has shown that NUA has potential to be used as a sorbent for pesticides. Water quality/ Atrazine/ Diuron/ 2,4-D/ Chlorpyrifos

990. Olsson, O.; Khodorkovsky, M.; Gassmann, M.; Friedler, E.; Schneider, M., and Dubowski, Y. Fate of Pesticides and Their Transformation Products: First Flush Effects in a Semi-Arid Catchment. 2013; 41, (2): 134-142.


Rec #: 66189
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Although it is known for many years, that transformation products (TPs) of pesticides are often more persistent, mobile, and sometimes more toxic than the parent compound, former catchment scale studies of substance release and flushing effects focused only on the parent compound. In this study, four river points were sampled in the Hula Valley, Israel, and samples were analyzed in the lab for chlorpyrifos (CP) and endosulfan residues (including transformation products; TPs). Sampling results of the first rainfall in autumn 2009 identified a strong release of most substances to the rivers. First flush effects of these substances were assessed regarding the risk for drinking water supply and ecology, like fresh water invertebrates and fish. Although, these substances were found in Jordan River water during the first significant rainfall the observed levels are below international drinking water guideline values with no adverse effects on human health in the region. However, the observed CP and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) levels are above the acute toxicity for fresh water invertebrates and fish. The study shows that the Hula Valley was an important source of pesticides and TPs at the Upper Jordan River basin and that substance flushing is extremely important for pesticides-monitoring campaigns.
Keywords: Assessment, Chlorpyrifos residues, Endosulfan residues, Monitoring,
ISI Document Delivery No.: 075JA

991. Omeroglu, P. Y.; Ambrus, A., and Boyacioglu, D. Estimation of Sample Processing Uncertainty of Large-Size Crops in Pesticide Residue Analysis. 2013; 6, (1): 238-247.


Rec #: 66199
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Sample processing procedure should result in analytical portions that are representative of the analytical sample, even if 1-5 g portion are withdrawn from a large-size crops. Therefore, the efficiency of sample processing should be regularly tested during method validation and internal quality control studies. In the scope of this study, sample processing uncertainty was investigated by surface treatment of the cucumber, papaya, and jackfruit representing large-size crops with radio-labelled chlorpyrifos methyl. After homogenization in a chopper, five small and five large test portions were withdrawn from "statistically" well-mixed materials and their residue content was determined with liquid scintillation counter, which provided a quick and well reproducible mode of quantitative determination of residues. The efficiency of sample processing characterized with the sampling constant, changed between 0.78 and 3.01 kg with typical value of 1.61 kg for processing at ambient temperature. Once the sampling constant was established, it was used to predict the uncertainty of sample processing for different test portion sizes. Uncertainty of sample processing at 30 g analytical portion varied between 4.70 and 10.55 %. Furthermore, addition of dry ice to papaya resulted in well-mixed samples as well as 50 % reduction in sampling constant value.
Keywords: Pesticide, Pesticide residue analysis, Uncertainty, Sample processing
ISI Document Delivery No.: 066GO

992. ---. Estimation of the uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps in pesticide residue analysis of plant commodities. 2013; 30, (2): 308-320.


Rec #: 66209
Keywords: CHEM METHODS
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Extraction and clean-up constitute important steps in pesticide residue analysis. For the correct interpretation of analytical results, uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps should be taken into account when the combined uncertainty of the analytical result is estimated. In the scope of this study, uncertainties of extraction and clean-up steps were investigated by spiking 14C-labelled chlorpyrifos to analytical portions of tomato, orange, apple, green bean, cucumber, jackfruit, papaya and starfruit. After each step, replicate measurements were carried out with a liquid scintillation counter. Uncertainties in extraction and clean-up steps were estimated separately for every matrix and method combination by using within-laboratory reproducibility standard deviation and were characterised with the CV of recoveries. It was observed that the uncertainty of the ethyl acetate extraction step varied between 0.8% and 5.9%. The relative standard uncertainty of the clean-up step with dispersive SPE used in the method known as QuEChERS was estimated to be around 1.5% for tomato, apple and green beans. The highest variation of 4.8% was observed in cucumber. The uncertainty of the clean-up step with gel permeation chromatography ranged between 5.3% and 13.1%, and it was relatively higher than that obtained with the dispersive SPE method.
Keywords: ethyl acetate extraction, extraction and clean-up, gel permeation
ISI Document Delivery No.: 072KW

993. Oostingh, G. J.; Wichmann, G.; Schmittner, M.; Lehmann, I., and Dusch, A. The Cytotoxic Effects of the Organophosphates Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon Differ from Their Immunomodulating Effects. 2009; 6, (2): 136-145.


Rec #: 270
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Call Number: NO HUMAN HEALTH (CPY,DZ)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY,DZ

994. Opong-Mensah, K. A Review of Temephos with Particular Reference to the West African Onchocerciasis Control Program. 1984; 91, 47-69.


Rec #: 1650
Keywords: REFS CHECKED,REVIEW
Call Number: NO REFS CHECKED (CPY,FNT,MLN,TMP), NO REVIEW (CPY,FNT,MLN,TMP)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY,FNT,FNTH,MLN,TMP

995. Ormad, M P; Miguel, N; Claver, a; Matesanz, J M; Ovelleiro, J L, and Ormad, M P. Pesticides Removal in the Process of Drinking Water Production. 2008 Mar; 71, (1): 97-106.


Rec #: 46049
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The aim of this research work was to study the effectiveness of the treatments commonly used in drinking water plants in Spain to degrade 44 pesticides systematically detected in the Ebro River Basin. The pesticides studied are: alachlor, aldrin, ametryn, atrazine, chlorfenvinfos, chlorpyrifos, pp'-DDD, op'-DDE, op'-DDT, pp'-DDT, desethylatrazine, 3,4-dichloroaniline, 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone, dicofol, dieldrin, dimethoate, diuron, alpha -endosulphan, endosulphan-sulphate, endrin, alpha -HCH, beta -HCH, gamma -HCH, delta -HCH, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide A, heptachlor epoxide B, hexachlorobenzene, isodrin, 4-isopropylaniline, isoproturon, metholachlor, methoxychlor, molinate, parathion methyl, parathion ethyl, prometon, prometryn, propazine, simazine, terbuthylazine, terbutryn, tetradifon and trifluralin. The techniques applied are: preoxidation by chlorine or ozone, chemical precipitation with aluminium sulphate and activated carbon adsorption. Oxidation by chlorine removes 60% of the studied pesticides, although combining this technique with a coagulation-flocculation-decantation process is more effective. The disadvantage of this treatment is the formation of trihalomethanes. Oxidation by ozone removes 70% of the studied pesticides. Although combination with a subsequent coagulation-flocculation-decantation process does not improve the efficiency of the process, combination with an activated-carbon absorption process gives rise to 90% removal of the studied pesticides. This technique was found to be the most efficient among the techniques studied for degrading the majority of the studied pesticides.
Keywords: Aldrin
Keywords: Chlorine
Keywords: Sulphates
Keywords: Pollution Abstracts; Aqualine Abstracts; Water Resources Abstracts; ASFA 3: Aquatic Pollution & Environmental Quality
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: Absorption spectroscopy
Keywords: Spain, Ebro R. basin
Keywords: Agricultural Chemicals
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: Drinking Water
Keywords: Ozone
Keywords: Sorption
Keywords: P 0000:AIR POLLUTION
Keywords: Dieldrin
Keywords: Alachlor
Keywords: River basins
Keywords: Herbicides
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Chemical precipitation
Keywords: Heptachlor
Keywords: Oxidation
Keywords: Aluminium
Keywords: Aluminum
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Methoxychlor
Keywords: Chlorination
Keywords: Drinking water
Keywords: Parathion
Date revised - 2008-05-01
Language of summary - English
Location - Spain, Ebro R. basin
Pages - 97-106
ProQuest ID - 289491021
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Pesticides; Agricultural Chemicals; Heptachlor; Drinking Water; Parathion; Oxidation; Chlorine; Alachlor; Methoxychlor; Spain, Ebro R. basin; Herbicides; Chlorination; Drinking water; Aldrin; Ozone; Chlorpyrifos; River basins; Aluminum; Insecticides; Aluminium; Absorption spectroscopy; Chemical precipitation; Dieldrin; Sorption; Sulphates
Last updated - 2011-10-26
Corporate institution author - Ormad, M P; Miguel, N; Claver, A; Matesanz, J M; Ovelleiro, J L
DOI - OB-MD-0007973133; 8100626; 0045-6535 English

996. Ormad, Maria P; Miguel, Natividad; Lanao, Munia; Mosteo, Rosa; Ovelleiro, Jose L, and Ormad, Maria P. Effect of Application of Ozone and Ozone Combined With Hydrogen Peroxide and Titanium Dioxide in the Removal of Pesticides From Water. 2010 Jan; 32, (1): 25-32.


Rec #: 44369
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: The aim of this research work is to study the influence of hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide in the ozone-based treatment to degrade 44 organic pesticides present in natural water, which are systematically detected in the Ebro River Basin (Spain). The studied pesticides are: alachlor, aldrin, ametryn, atrazine, chlorfenvinfos, chlorpyrifos, pp'-DDD, op'-DDE, op'-DDT. pp'-DDT, desethylatrazine, 3,4-dichloroaniline, 4,4'-dichlorobenzophenone, dicofol, dieldrin, dimethoate, diuron, a-endosulphan, endosulphan-sulphate, endrin, alpha -HCH, beta -HCH, gamma -HCH, delta -HCH, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide A, heptachlor epoxide B, hexachlorobenzene, isodrin, 4-isopropylaniline, isoproturon, metholachlor, methoxychlor, molinate, parathion methyl, parathion ethyl, prometon, prometryn, propazine, simazine, terbuthylazine, terbutryn, tetradifon and trifluralin. The ozonation using 3 mg O3 L-1 produces a pesticides removal close to 23%, whereas the application of O3/H2O2 and O3/TiO2 treatments achieves average degradation yields lower than the ozonation. However, the application of O3/H2O2 /TiO2 process improves considerably the pesticides degradation and an average degradation yield of 36% is obtained.
Keywords: Degradation
Keywords: titanium dioxide
Keywords: Aldrin
Keywords: Q5 01521:Mechanical and natural changes
Keywords: AQ 00004:Water Treatment
Keywords: Hydrogen
Keywords: Freshwater
Keywords: molinate
Keywords: Spain, Ebro R. basin
Keywords: Yield
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: Agricultural Chemicals
Keywords: SW 3060:Water treatment and distribution
Keywords: Ozonation
Keywords: Ozone
Keywords: Titanium
Keywords: P 2000:FRESHWATER POLLUTION
Keywords: Dieldrin
Keywords: Alachlor
Keywords: River basins
Keywords: Simazine
Keywords: Herbicides
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Heptachlor
Keywords: Atrazine
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: hydrogen peroxide
Keywords: Trifluralin
Keywords: ENA 01:Air Pollution
Keywords: Environment Abstracts; Water Resources Abstracts; Aqualine Abstracts; ASFA 3: Aquatic Pollution & Environmental Quality; Pollution Abstracts
Keywords: Parathion
Date revised - 2010-08-01
Language of summary - English
Location - Spain, Ebro R. basin
Pages - 25-32
ProQuest ID - 754556291
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Titanium; Aldrin; Dieldrin; Pesticides; Herbicides; River basins; Hydrogen; Ozonation; Ozone; Degradation; titanium dioxide; Alachlor; Simazine; molinate; Chlorpyrifos; Insecticides; Heptachlor; Atrazine; hydrogen peroxide; Trifluralin; Parathion; Yield; Agricultural Chemicals; Spain, Ebro R. basin; Freshwater
Last updated - 2012-10-19
British nursing index edition - Ozone: Science & Engineering [Ozone: Sci. Eng.]. Vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 25-32. Jan 2010.
Corporate institution author - Ormad, Maria P; Miguel, Natividad; Lanao, Munia; Mosteo, Rosa; Ovelleiro, Jose L
DOI - 970afc68-f854-4bfc-8202csamfg201; 13333711; CS1102425; 0191-9512; 1547-6545 English

997. Osman, Ka; Al-Humaid, a M; Al-Rehiayani, S M; Al-Redhaiman, K N, and Osman, KA. Monitoring of Pesticide Residues in Vegetables Marketed in Al-Qassim Region, Saudi Arabia. 2010 Sep; 73, (6): 1433-1439.


Rec #: 47749
Keywords: SURVEY
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: A total of 23 pesticides from different chemical groups in 160 different domestic vegetables collected from four major big supermarkets located in Al-Qassim region, Saudi Arabia, were identified by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Residues were found in 89 of the 160 samples and 53 samples were above the maximum residue levels (MRLs). The most frequently found pesticides were carbaryl followed by biphenyl and then carbofuran. Cabbage was the most positive and violated MLRs (16 and 11 samples), followed by carrot and green pepper (12 and 7 samples), cucumber (12 and 6 samples), egg-plant (12 and 5 samples), squash (11 and 7 samples), lettuce (11 and 6 samples) and tomato (11 and 4 samples). The highest concentrations were found in lettuce (ethiofencarb, 7.648), followed by tomato (tolclofos-methyl, 7.312mg/kg), cabbage (chlropyrifos, 6.207mg/kg), carrot (heptanophos, 3.267mg/kg), green pepper (carbaryl, 2.228mg/kg) and egg-plant (carbaryl, 1.917mg/kg). These findings pointed to the following recommendation: the need for a monitoring program for pesticide residues in vegetables cultivated under greenhouse conditions at the national level to protect consumers' health.
Keywords: Saudi Arabia
Keywords: Vegetables
Keywords: Carbofuran
Keywords: ENA 09:Land Use & Planning
Keywords: Pesticide residues
Keywords: Environmental Studies--Toxicology And Environmental Safety
Keywords: Mass spectrometry
Keywords: Carbaryl
Keywords: carbofuran
Keywords: Daucus
Keywords: tolclofos-methyl
Keywords: P 6000:TOXICOLOGY AND HEALTH
Keywords: Brassica
Keywords: Mass spectroscopy
Keywords: Greenhouses
Keywords: Biphenyl
Keywords: Lycopersicon esculentum
Keywords: Gas chromatography
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: greenhouses
Keywords: consumer protection
Keywords: Consumers
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Environment Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts; Pollution Abstracts
Date revised - 2011-10-01
Language of summary - English
Location - Saudi Arabia
Pages - 1433-1439
ProQuest ID - 811163065
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Biphenyl; Vegetables; Carbofuran; Gas chromatography; Pesticide residues; Pesticides; Carbaryl; Consumers; tolclofos-methyl; Mass spectroscopy; Greenhouses; greenhouses; Mass spectrometry; consumer protection; carbofuran; Lycopersicon esculentum; Daucus; Brassica; Saudi Arabia
Last updated - 2011-12-08
Corporate institution author - Osman, KA; Al-Humaid, A M; Al-Rehiayani, S M; Al-Redhaiman, K N
DOI - OB-a70eb114-762f-4952-b289csaobj202; 13667585; 0147-6513 English

998. Osman, Rozita; Saim, Norashikin; Juahir, Hafizan; Abdullah, Md Pauzi, and Osman, Rozita. Chemometric Application in Identifying Sources of Organic Contaminants in Langat River Basin. 2012 Jan; 184, (2): 1001-1014.


Rec #: 42909
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Increasing urbanization and changes in land use in Langat river basin lead to adverse impacts on the environment compartment. One of the major challenges is in identifying sources of organic contaminants. This study presented the application of selected chemometric techniques: cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis (PCA) to classify the pollution sources in Langat river basin based on the analysis of water and sediment samples collected from 24 stations, monitored for 14 organic contaminants from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), sterols, and pesticides groups. The CA and DA enabled to group 24 monitoring sites into three groups of pollution source (industry and urban socioeconomic, agricultural activity, and urban/domestic sewage) with five major discriminating variables: naphthalene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, coprostanol, and cholesterol. PCA analysis, applied to water data sets, resulted in four latent factors explaining 79.0% of the total variance while sediment samples gave five latent factors with 77.6% explained variance. The varifactors (VFs) obtained from PCA indicated that sterols (coprostanol, cholesterol, stigmasterol, beta -sitosterol, and stigmastanol) are strongly correlated to domestic and urban sewage, PAHs (naphthalene, acenaphthene, pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene) from industrial and urban activities and chlorpyrifos correlated to samples nearby agricultural sites. The results demonstrated that chemometric techniques can be used for rapid assessment of water and sediment contaminations.
Keywords: Water Pollution
Keywords: Pollution monitoring
Keywords: River Basins
Keywords: Urbanization
Keywords: Water Pollution Sources
Keywords: SW 3030:Effects of pollution
Keywords: Pyrene
Keywords: Water analysis
Keywords: pyrene
Keywords: M2 551.510.42:Air Pollution (551.510.42)
Keywords: Dopamine
Keywords: Assessments
Keywords: Pollution Abstracts; Environment Abstracts; Aqualine Abstracts; Water Resources Abstracts; Meteorological & Geoastrophysical Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Sterols
Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in river water
Keywords: Sediment Contamination
Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sources
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Environmental monitoring
Keywords: Principal component analysis
Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Keywords: acenaphthene
Keywords: P 2000:FRESHWATER POLLUTION
Keywords: Naphthalene
Keywords: River basins
Keywords: Cholesterol
Keywords: cholesterol
Keywords: Sediments
Keywords: Land use
Keywords: ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety
Keywords: Pollution sources
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: Socio-economic aspects
Keywords: AQ 00007:Industrial Effluents
Keywords: Sewage
Keywords: Principal components analysis
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Pesticides in river water
Keywords: Benzo(a)pyrene
Keywords: Organic Compounds
Keywords: Monitoring
Keywords: Contaminants
Date revised - 2012-03-01
Language of summary - English
Pages - 1001-1014
ProQuest ID - 926882408
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; acenaphthene; Urbanization; Naphthalene; River basins; Pyrene; Cholesterol; Land use; Sediments; Pollution sources; Chlorpyrifos; Socio-economic aspects; Dopamine; Sewage; Sterols; Principal components analysis; Pesticides; Benzo(a)pyrene; Contaminants; Environmental monitoring; Principal component analysis; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in river water; Pesticides in river water; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons sources; Pollution monitoring; pyrene; Water analysis; cholesterol; Water Pollution; River Basins; Assessments; Water Pollution Sources; Sediment Contamination; Organic Compounds; Monitoring
Last updated - 2012-06-18
British nursing index edition - Environmental Monitoring and Assessment [Environ. Monit. Assess.]. Vol. 184, no. 2, pp. 1001-1014. Jan 2012.
Corporate institution author - Osman, Rozita; Saim, Norashikin; Juahir, Hafizan; Abdullah, Md Pauzi
DOI - 30b7a157-5fbb-4c60-ba63mfgefd107; 16367097; 0167-6369; 1573-2959 English

999. Ostrea, E M; Bielawski, D M; Posecion, N C; Corrion, M; Villanueva-Uy, E; Bernardo, R C; Jin, Y; Janisse, J J; Ager, J W, and Ostrea, E M. Combined Analysis of Prenatal (Maternal Hair and Blood) and Neonatal (Infant Hair, Cord Blood and Meconium) Matrices to Detect Fetal Exposure to Environmental Pesticides. 2009 Jan; 109, (1): 116-122.


Rec #: 45179
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to determine optimum biomarkers to detect fetal exposure to environmental pesticides by the simultaneous analysis of maternal (hair and blood) and infant (cord blood, infant hair or meconium) matrices and to determine if a combination of these biomarkers will further increase the detection rate. Patients and methods: Pregnant women were prospectively recruited from an agricultural site in the Philippines with substantial use at home and in the farm of the following pesticides: propoxur, cyfluthrin, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, pretilachlor, bioallethrin, malathion, diazinon and transfluthrin. Maternal hair and blood were obtained at midgestation and at delivery and infant hair, cord blood and meconium were obtained after birth. All samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the above pesticides and some of their metabolites. Results: A total of 598 mother/infant dyads were included in this report. The highest rates of pesticide exposure were detected in meconium (23.2% to propoxur, 2.0% to pretilachlor, 1.7% to cypermethrin, 0.8% to cyfluthrin, 0.7% to 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis, p-chlorophenylethane (DDT) and 0.3% to malathion and bioallethrin) and in maternal hair (21.6% to propoxur, 14.5% to bioallethrin, 1.3% to malathion, 0.8% to DDT, 0.3% to chlorpyrifos and 0.2% to pretilachlor). Combined analysis of maternal hair and meconium increased detection rate further to 38.5% for propoxur and to 16.7% for pyrethroids. Pesticide metabolites were rarely found in any of the analyzed matrices. Conclusions: There is significant exposure of the pregnant woman and her fetus to pesticides, particularly to the home pesticides, propoxur and pyrethroids. Analysis of meconium for pesticides was the single most sensitive measure of exposure. However, combined analysis of maternal hair and meconium significantly increased the detection rate. A major advantage of analyzing maternal hair is that prenatal pesticide exposure in the mother can be detected and intervention measures can be initiated to minimize further exposure of the fetus to pesticides. cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylic acid trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylic acid
Keywords: Philippines
Keywords: Farms
Keywords: Prenatal experience
Keywords: Mass spectrometry
Keywords: Metabolites
Keywords: P 6000:TOXICOLOGY AND HEALTH
Keywords: Mass spectroscopy
Keywords: Malathion
Keywords: Cord blood
Keywords: Insecticides
Keywords: Gas chromatography
Keywords: farms
Keywords: intervention
Keywords: Pyrethroids
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Bioindicators
Keywords: Cypermethrin
Keywords: Meconium
Keywords: Toxicology Abstracts; Pollution Abstracts
Keywords: Hair
Keywords: biomarkers
Keywords: Fetuses
Keywords: Pregnancy
Keywords: Birth
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: cypermethrin
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: DDT
Keywords: Neonates
Keywords: Diazinon
Keywords: Infants
Date revised - 2009-01-01
Language of summary - English
Location - Philippines
Pages - 116-122
ProQuest ID - 20248939
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Farms; Prenatal experience; Cypermethrin; Meconium; Metabolites; Hair; biomarkers; Mass spectroscopy; Fetuses; Malathion; Pregnancy; Birth; Cord blood; Chlorpyrifos; Gas chromatography; DDT; Pesticides; Neonates; Pyrethroids; Diazinon; Infants; Bioindicators; Mass spectrometry; cypermethrin; Insecticides; intervention; farms; Philippines
Last updated - 2011-12-14
British nursing index edition - Environmental Research [Environ. Res.]. Vol. 109, no. 1, pp. 116-122. Jan 2009.
Corporate institution author - Ostrea, E M; Bielawski, D M; Posecion, N C; Corrion, M; Villanueva-Uy, E; Bernardo, R C; Jin, Y; Janisse, J J; Ager, J W
DOI - MD-0009070507; 8871698; 0013-9351 English

1000. Ostrea, E. M.; Reyes, A.; Villanueva-Uy, E.; Pacifico, R.; Benitez, B.; Ramos, E.; Bernardo, R. C.; Bielawski, D. M.; Delaney-Black, V.; Chiodo, L.; Janisse, J. J., and Ager, J. W. Fetal exposure to propoxur and abnormal child neurodevelopment at 2 years of age. 2012; 33, (4): 669-675.


Rec #: 66299
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Objective: Our aim was to determine the effects of fetal exposure to propoxur and pyrethroids, on child neurodevelopment at 2 years of age. Patients and methods: Mothers were prospectively recruited during mid-pregnancy in Bulacan, Philippines where multiple pesticides including propoxur, cyfluthrin, chlorpyrifos, cypermethrin, pretilachlor, bioallethrin, malathion, diazinon and transfluthrin are used. To detect prenatal exposure to these pesticides, maternal hair and blood, infant's hair, cord blood, and meconium were analyzed for the pesticides by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Infants were examined at 2 years of age with 95.1% follow up rate and their neurodevelopment outcome was assessed by the Griffiths mental developmental scale (N = 754). Results: Meconium analysis was the most sensitive method to detect fetal exposure to pesticides and exposure was highest for propoxur (21.3%) and the grouped pyrethroids (2.5% - bioallethrin, transfluthrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin). Path analysis modeling was performed to determine the effects of fetal exposure to propoxur and pyrethroids on the child's neurodevelopment at 24 months of age while controlling for confounders. Only singletons and those with complete data for the path analysis were included (N = 696). Using a path analysis model, there was a significant negative (beta = -0.14, p < 0.001) relationship between prenatal pesticide exposure to propoxur and motor development at 2 years of age after controlling for confounders, e.g., infant gender, socioeconomic status, maternal intelligence, home stimulation (HOME), postnatal exposure to propoxur and blood lead level at 2 years of age. Conclusion: At 2 years of age, prenatal exposure to propoxur was associated with poorer motor development in children. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Propoxur, Pesticides, Pyrethroids, Prenatal and postnatal pesticide
ISI Document Delivery No.: 990FU

1001. Otake, T.; Yarita, T.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kuroda, Y.; Numata, M.; Iwata, H.; Mizukoshi, K.; Nakamura, M.; Watai, M.; Mitsuda, H.; Fujikawa, T., and Ota, H. Development of Green Onion and Cabbage Certified Reference Materials for Quantification of Organophosphorus and Pyrethroid Pesticides. SOIL; 2011; 59, (16): 8568-8574.


Rec #: 2880
Keywords: METHODS
Call Number: NO METHODS (CPY,CYP,DZ,EFX,FNT,PMR)
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY,CYP,DZ,EFX,FNT,PMR

1002. Otieno, P. O.; Owuor, P. O.; Lalah, J. O.; Pfister, G. , and Schramm, K. W. Impacts of climate-induced changes on the distribution of pesticides residues in water and sediment of Lake Naivasha, Kenya. 2013; 185, (3): 2723-2733.


Rec #: 66329
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: This study reports evidence of increased chlorpyrifos contamination in sediment and water in Lake Naivasha following its intensive application in the horticultural farms in the catchment area. Analytical results show that levels of chlorpyrifos residues were influenced by climate-induced rainfall pattern with higher levels reported during period of heavy precipitation with significant decrease during low rainfall. On average, the levels ranged between 14.8 and 32.8 ng g(-1) in sediment during rainy season compared to a range of 8.5-16.6 ng g(-1) in the dry season. Additionally, the mean concentration of chlorpyrifos in water ranged between 8.61 and 22.4 mu g L(-1) during rainy season and below detection limit (bdl) -13.6 mu g L(-1) in dry season as quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Meanwhile, independent t test analysis indicated that there was significant difference in concentration at p a parts per thousand currency signaEuro parts per thousand 0.05 between the seasons with respect to sediment and water samples. This demonstrated that climate-induced variations had considerable influence on contamination. While diazinon and carbofuran were equally applied intensively, their levels were below the detection limit in the all the samples analyzed. ELISA results were validated by the capillary-HPLC photodiode-array detector instrument analysis, and statistical comparison showed no significant difference between them. It was evident that chlorpyrifos residues determination in water and sediment by ELISA can be a useful strategy in environmental management and monitoring program, and a complimentary analytical tool to high performance liquid chromatography. Levels of chlorpyrifos detected in sediment and water were found to exceed recommended criteria for protection of aquatic life and preservation of water quality and may be hazardous if not regularly monitored.
Keywords: Climate, Pesticides, ELISA, Water, Sediment, Contamination
ISI Document Delivery No.: 077NB

1003. Otieno, Peter O; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Pfister, Gerd; Lalah, Joseph O; Ojwach, Stephen O; Virani, Munir, and Otieno, Peter O. Spatial Distribution and Temporal Trend in Concentration of Carbofuran, Diazinon and Chlorpyrifos Ethyl Residues in Sediment and Water in Lake Naivasha, Kenya. 2012 Apr; 88, (4 ): 526-532.


Rec #: 38899
Keywords: FATE
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Chlorpyrifos ethyl was found to be widely distributed in water and sediment in Lake Naivasha. Higher levels were reported in sediment (11.2-30.0 ng g super(-1) dry weight (dw) in wet season than in dry season (4.7-17.4 ng g super(-1) dw). The mean concentration of chlorpyrifos ethyl in water in wet season ranged between 8.8 and 26.6 mu g L super(-1) and decreased to between below detection limit to 14.0 mu g L super(-1) in dry season. On average, higher concentrations of chlorpyrifos ethyl were observed in sediment than water samples. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in concentration between the seasons, and a significant interaction between seasons and mean concentrations at p less than or equal to 0.05. However, levels of diazinon and carbofuran were below the detection limit in all the samples analyzed. Notably, levels of chlorpyrifos ethyl were higher than the maximum allowable limits (0.1 mu g L super(-1)) recommended by European Union for drinking water and general water quality criterion for protection of freshwater water organisms (0.083 mu g L super(-1)).
Keywords: Spatial distribution
Keywords: Water sampling
Keywords: Statistical analysis
Keywords: Water quality
Keywords: Wet season
Keywords: Environmental Studies
Keywords: spatial distribution
Keywords: Lakes
Keywords: Kenya
Keywords: M2 551.5:General (551.5)
Keywords: Seasonal variability
Keywords: X 24330:Agrochemicals
Keywords: Kenya, Rift Valley, Naivasha L.
Keywords: Environment Abstracts; Pollution Abstracts; Meteorological & Geoastrophysical Abstracts; Toxicology Abstracts
Keywords: Carbofuran
Keywords: P 2000:FRESHWATER POLLUTION
Keywords: carbofuran
Keywords: dry season
Keywords: Sediments
Keywords: ENA 02:Toxicology & Environmental Safety
Keywords: Chlorpyrifos
Keywords: European Union
Keywords: Pesticides
Keywords: Dry season
Keywords: Drinking water
Keywords: Diazinon
Date revised - 2012-04-01
Language of summary - English
Location - Kenya; European Union; Kenya, Rift Valley, Naivasha L.
Pages - 526-532
ProQuest ID - 929622460
SubjectsTermNotLitGenreText - Chlorpyrifos; Lakes; Spatial distribution; Carbofuran; Statistical analysis; Water quality; Drinking water; Diazinon; Sediments; Seasonal variability; Dry season; Wet season; spatial distribution; Water sampling; Pesticides; dry season; carbofuran; Kenya; European Union; Kenya, Rift Valley, Naivasha L.
Last updated - 2012-04-19
Corporate institution author - Otieno, Peter O; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Pfister, Gerd; Lalah, Joseph O; Ojwach, Stephen O; Virani, Munir
DOI - OB-2f10aef8-edb1-4326-99e6mfgefd101; 16438185; 0007-4861; 1432-0800 English

1004. Otte, J. L. and Carpenter, J. S. Theories, Models, and Frameworks Related to Sleep-Wake Disturbances in the Context of Cancer.


Rec #: 50919
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article was to review theories, models, and frameworks of sleep disturbances referenced in the cancer literature. Sleep-wake disturbances in cancer are a significant problem that negatively affects quality of life. There is no previously published review of the theories, models, or frameworks used to study sleep-wake disturbances in the context of cancer. Describing existing theories or models and their application in cancer is important to advance knowledge in this area. Two theories and 9 models were identified for review. These have been used to further understand the problem of sleep-wake disturbances as a primary or secondary symptom within the cancer literature. Searches were conducted from January 1, 1970, to July 31, 2008, to find relevant articles using 4 electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, and PsychINFO. On the basis of the search, 73 descriptive or intervention studies were identified and reviewed. Most research was atheoretical, with no identified theory, model, or framework. In studies that did use theory or models, few were applied in more than one study. Although several commonalities across models did emerge, a more comprehensive and widely used model could help guide nursing research to facilitate effective symptom management for this prominent problem in cancer.
MESH HEADINGS: Adaptation, Physiological/physiology
MESH HEADINGS: Fatigue/etiology/physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Hot Flashes/complications/physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: *Models, Biological
MESH HEADINGS: Neoplasms/*complications/nursing
MESH HEADINGS: Nursing Theory
MESH HEADINGS: Oncologic Nursing/methods
MESH HEADINGS: Quality of Life
MESH HEADINGS: Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/*etiology/*physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology/physiopathology eng

1005. Otte, J. L.; Flockhart, D.; Hayes, D.; Storniolo, A. M.; Stearns, V.; Schneider, B.; Henry, N. L.; Azzouz, F.; Nguyen, A.; Lemler, S.; Hayden, J.; Jeter, S.; Wright, L., and Carpenter, J. S. Comparison of Subjective and Objective Hot Flash Measures Over Time Among Breast Cancer Survivors Initiating Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy.


Rec #: 50779
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
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ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Hot flashes are valuable indicators of physiological condition and drug effect; however, subjective and objective measures do not always agree. No study has examined both subjective and objective hot flashes in women prescribed aromatase inhibitors. The study (1) compared subjective and objective hot flash measures, (2) examined changes in subjective and objective hot flashes over time, and (3) evaluated predictors of change in hot flashes in aromatase inhibitor-treated women.
ABSTRACT: METHODS: Participants (n = 135) were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial comparing exemestane and letrozole for the treatment of breast cancer. Hot flashes were assessed before the start of the drug therapy and 1, 3, and 6 months later. Participants wore a sternal skin conductance monitor for 24 hours or longer at each time point. With each perceived hot flash, women pressed an event button and rated intensity and bother in a paper diary.
ABSTRACT: RESULTS: Participants had a mean age of 60 years and were mainly white (92%). Across time points, monitor hot flashes were (1) significantly more frequent than diary and/or event button flashes (P < 0.05) and (2) moderately correlated with subjective measures (0.35 < r < 0.56). Monitor hot flashes did not significantly change over time with aromatase inhibitor therapy, whereas both diary and event button frequencies significantly varied but in dissimilar patterns (51% nonlinear). No consistent predictors of hot flashes across measures or time points were identified.
ABSTRACT: CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicated dissimilarities between subjective and objective measures of hot flashes. Despite statistical significance, there was little clinically meaningful change in hot flashes after initiating aromatase inhibitor therapy.
MESH HEADINGS: Androstadienes/adverse effects/therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Aromatase Inhibitors/adverse effects/*therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Body Mass Index
MESH HEADINGS: Breast Neoplasms/*drug therapy/physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Female
MESH HEADINGS: Galvanic Skin Response
MESH HEADINGS: Hot Flashes/chemically induced/*physiopathology
MESH HEADINGS: Humans
MESH HEADINGS: Linear Models
MESH HEADINGS: Middle Aged
MESH HEADINGS: Nitriles/adverse effects/therapeutic use
MESH HEADINGS: Sensitivity and Specificity
MESH HEADINGS: Triazoles/adverse effects/therapeutic use eng

1006. Otto, Tamara C; Kasten, Shane a; Kovaleva, Elena; Liu, Zhi; Buchman, George; Tolosa, Marita; Davis, David; Smith, J Richard; Balcerzak, Robert; Lenz, David E, and Cerasoli, Douglas M. Purification and Characterization of Functional Human Paraoxonase-1 Expressed in Trichoplusia Ni Larvae. 2010 Sep 6; 187, (1-3): 388-392.


Rec #: 43849
Keywords: HUMAN HEALTH
Notes: Chemical of Concern: CPY
Abstract: Abstract: Human serum paraoxonase-1 (HuPON1) is difficult to either purify from plasma or functionally express in high yield from recombinant sources. Here, we describe the characterization of functional HuPON1 expressed and purified from Trichoplusia ni (T. ni) larvae infected with an orally active form of baculovirus. SDS-PAGE and anti-HuPON1 Western blot analyses yielded only three bands of approximately 41, 42, and 44 kDa. MALDI-TOF confirmed the identity of each of these bands as HuPON1 with greater than 95% confidence. These isoforms result from differential glycosylation of the enzyme as indicated by peptide mapping, mass analysis, and PNGase F deglycosylation experiments. Recombinant insect-produced HuPON1 hydrolyzed phenyl acetate, paraoxon, and the nerve agents GF, VX, and VR. The enzyme had dramatic stereoselectivity for the P+ isomers of VX and VR. T. ni larvae expressing HuPON1 were remarkably resistant to the pesticide chlorpyrifos. Together, these results demonstrate that the caterpillar of the T. ni moth can be used as an expression system to produce large quantities of functional recombinant HuPON1. Insect production of HuPON1 may provide a source for both in vitro enzymatic and crystallographic studies and in vivo stability and anti-nerve agent efficacy testing. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Keywords: 2921-88-2
Keywords: Aryldialkylphosphatase -- metabolism
Keywords: Animals
Keywords: Stereoisomerism
Keywords: Larva -- genetics
Keywords: Humans
Keywords: Gene Expression
Keywords: Aryldialkylphosphatase
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