Algonquin College Data Entry Spelling Guidelines



Download 109.39 Kb.
Date conversion08.07.2018
Size109.39 Kb.

Algonquin College Data Entry Spelling Guidelines
These spelling and word usage guidelines are for use in Algonquin College Monographs, onCourse, and Calendar program descriptions and should be used in combination with the Canadian Press Stylebook* and the Canadian Press Caps and Spelling guide.**



Commonly Used Word List

Word

Example and Notes

3D

CP: 3-D

behaviour




Adobe Acrobat




disc

discs


Do not use ‘CD’ or ‘compact discs’ (CP)

cancel

cancelled

cancelling

cancellation






centre

If referring to the name of a specific US site, use center.

For example: Rockefeller Center



chat room




coordinator

CP: co-ordinator

co-op

cooperation

cooperative


CP: co-operation

CP: co-operative

corequisite




coursework




decision-making

adj. decision-making group

demeanour




e-commerce

elearning

e-marketing




CP: eLearning


email

CP: e-mail

enrol

enroled

enrolling

enrolment



CP: enrolled

entry-level

adj. entry-level position

fall, winter, spring,
Fall 2008, Winter 2009, Spring/Summer 2009


In general, lowercase seasons
Use capitals when the season name is used in conjunction with the term

field work placement




fulfil

fulfilled, fulfilling

fulfilment





Full-time

Part-time



He is a Full-time student.

This Part-time program...



hands-on

adj. hands-on learning

HTML




information technology

IT

high-tech



high-technology

Do not use initial caps.

inquire

inquiry


inquiries

Not “enquire”.

Internet

intranet


the Net




in-depth

adj. in-depth coverage

labour




legislation




Legalization





login (noun)

log in


log off

log on


logged in

Log on to access your mail.

To login, you must provide a username and password.

She was logged in to the server.


long-term

adj. long-term care facility

lowercase

uppercase






manikin

used in nursing content

model

modelling

modelled





multimedia




offence




onCourse

The onCourse catalogue...

online




percent

percentage



CP: per cent

prerequisite




problem-solving

adj: problem-solving skills

program

programming






postsecondary

(Ministry standard)

real-world

adj. Students gain real-world experience....

URL




website

web


Webmaster

World Wide Web

worldwide





Windows Explorer








Commonly Misused Words




ADVICE – noun, like ice

ADVISE - verb, like is






ACCEPT - to receive

EXCEPT - to take or leave out









ITS – Plural of the pronoun It

IT’S – Abbreviation for It is






COMPLIMENT – give a compliment

COMPLEMENT - supplement something






COMPOSED OF – made up of

COMPRISE (no of) - contain all parts

INCLUDE – contains some parts





LICENCE – noun, a permit like Driver’s licence

LICENSE – verb, I am licensed to practise law

LICENSING – verb, present participle of to license





PRACTICE – noun, law firm; nursing practices

PRACTISE – verb, perform






PRINCIPLE – as in a code or standard

PRINCIPAL – as in the main or primary item






STATIONARY – unmoving

STATIONERY – writing material






WHICH – use to give a reason or add a new element. Generally need to use commas around the clause.

The movie, which cost millions of dollars to make, was a success.






THAT – use when the clause is essential to the noun it defines or narrows the topic.

The movie that opened last week.....






WHO – use when referring to he, she, or they

The man who ate the cake....






WHOM – use when referring to him, her, or them

Her neighbour whom she trusted....







Guideline

Examples and Notes

Insert ONE space after a period.

The boy ate a cake. The girl ate an orange.

Quotation Marks:
In general, always use double quotation marks except for headlines and quotes within a quote.

Place periods and commas inside closing quote marks; colons and semicolons go outside.


Use quotation marks to set off a significant word or phrase but not around routine words or phrases.


“The radio is on” said the girl.

“I can’t hear you,” the girl said.


Correct: His first ship was an old “rustbucket”.

Not: The minister replied that the economy is “improving”.


Numbers:

Write all numbers from one to nine in words.


Use numerals for numbers 10 and greater.
If the number begins a sentence, spell it out in full.
When writing a combination of numbers, that is, listing two numbers related to the same item, write them like this:
Write out dollar amounts
Use decimal points only if there are cents included in the dollar amount.


For a complete list, see CP Caps and Spelling, page 204
One, five, ten
25, 100, 85
Fifty students passed the course.

five 20-page booklets

150 three-inch nails

$4,500


$450
$4,500.02


Exclude http://www from all web addresses

Place a period after the URL.

(CP: Includes www (www.cp.org) but excludes http://.
For information, see the website algonquincollege.com.

(CP adds period after .com – See page 181 Stylebook)

USE the plural “students” where possible. Avoid using his/her.
Be consistent in your course descriptions: use either “student”, or “learner” or “participant” throughout.

Students must write their names....

Lowercase for program, diploma, and certificate when they appear along with the program name.


Ontario College Graduate Certificate program

Architectural Technician program

Architectural Technician diploma
Ontario College Certificate

Ontario College Graduate Certificate

Ontario College Diploma

Ontario College Advanced Diploma



Geography:
Capitalize widely recognized descriptive regions and specific natural features


Northern Canada

Lower Manhattan

North Pole

Western Canada

Canadian Shield

Gulf Stream

Rocky Mountains

Lake Ontario


eastern Quebec

southern Ontario

Atlantic provinces

Northwestern Ontario

western
English Canada

French Canada

English-Canadian

French-Canadian




Lowercase for college/university unless it is part of a name of a college.

If you can replace the word ‘college’ with the word ‘Algonquin’, capitalize College.


College’s schools or faculties

Uppercase the proper name of schools


Algonquin College standards

McGill University

The College standard....
Woodroffe Campus

Pembroke Campus


Algonquin College’s School of …

The Algonquin College School of Business


York Collegiate Institute

London School of Economics




In course or program descriptions, use initial caps for the title of the course or program when you refer to a specific course or program:


Courses include Financial Accounting, Human Resources, Marketing, ....
Students learn about marketing, financial accounting, and human resources...


Academic degrees and honors:
Compound abbreviations are written without spaces.

Mixed abbreviations that begin and end with a capital letter do not take periods.





B.Sc.


M.Sc.

P.Eng.
PhD

BA

MA

BIT



BScN


College-specific terms in program/course descriptions:

Note: Do not use semester, use ‘term’ or ‘level’.
When referring to a specific major or minor, capitalize the ‘M’:



Full-time program

Part-time program

Woodroffe Campus
Level 01, Level 02, Level 03...

Fall Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Winter Term

In the first three levels, students....


All English Majors

A Major in English

A Bachelor of Arts with a Minor in English.
Students choose their major area of study


Write phone numbers with dashes:


Note: To comply with government regulations, iconology must be used for telephone, toll-free, and fax numbers, URLs, and email addresses. Marketing has the icons and will ensure that Publishing includes the icons in publications, as required.

1-800-345-9874

613-765-2153

613-727-4723 ext. 1111





Commas
Use commas between the elements of a series but not before the final and.

Use commas with transition words:

When in doubt, err on the side of too few commas.


Men, women, children and pets.

Breakfast consisted of cereal, eggs, and croissants and butter.
, as well as

, such as

, however



Semicolon
Used to separate statements closely related to be used as separate sentences.
Used to separate phrases that contain commas.
Used to precede explanatory phrases introduced by for example, namely, that is.


“I never read a book before reviewing it; it prejudices a man so.”


Some pleasures cost next to nothing; for example, reading.



There are two correct ways to enter bulleted items.
(a) For a bulleted list when the items in the list are not complete sentences, do not capitalize the first word and do not put punctuation at the end of each item.

(b) If you are creating a bulleted list that consists of complete sentences, capitalize the first word and place a period at the end of each item.



Include the following in tables:



  • the rationale

  • the focus

  • an overview

  • employment opportunities

The following tips are for writing the course description:



  • Use only present tense and active voice.

  • Use simple sentence structure and concise language.

  • Use gender-neutral language.




Avoid using “all caps”, “quotation marks”, and *asterisks*.




Avoid using brackets in sentences. Try writing a second sentence to capture the information.





Use the % symbol only when referring to mathematical results.
Fractions:

Use figures for all numbers with fractions.


Spell out and hyphenate common fractions used alone.


A grade of 25%.

What percent of people eat carrots?

9 3/4
Three-quarters of the boys...

One-half of the students...




Time:

Use a colon to separate hours and minutes.


If the time being referenced is on the hour:

7:30 p.m.


7 p.m.


When using an acronym or abbreviation, spell out the full name on first reference followed by the acronym/abbreviation in parenthesis. Then use the acronym/abbreviation in the remainder of the text.

Note: An acronym is an abbreviation pronounced as words.
Acronyms formed with the first letter of each word are all caps.
Acronyms formed from initial and other letters are in caps and lowercase.
Acronyms that have become common words are not capitalized.


The NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization)...(an acronym)
The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).....(an abbreviation)

A CT (computerized tomography) scan

Dofasco (Dominion Foundries and Steel Corp.)

scuba (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus)

radar (radio detection and ranging)


* Canadian Press Stylebook A Guide for Writing and Editing/Patti Tasko, editor. 14th edition.

Toronto, 2006.

** The Canadian Press CAPS and Spelling/Patti Tasko, editor. 18th edition. Toronto, 2007.


November 25, 2010




The database is protected by copyright ©dentisty.org 2016
send message

    Main page