1. general information about norway 1 A. Geographical, economic, demographic, social and cultural indicators 1



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3. Health



  1. Infant mortality (deaths within the first year of life per 1 000 live births) is 2.5 (2012). The average for the last five years has been 2.7. The table shows infant mortality for the period 1966-2010.

 Year


Deaths under one year of age per 1 000 live births

1966-1970

13.9

1971-1975

11.6

1976-1980

9.0

1981-1985

8.1

1986-1990

7.8

1991-1995

5.2

1996-2000

4.0

2001-2005

3,4

2006-2010

3.4




  1. The table shows maternal mortality for the period 1999-2010.

Year

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010




8.4

3.4

5.3

3.6

12.4

0

3.5

8.5

6.8

2

5

7




  1. The table shows the proportion of induced abortions as a percentage of live births for the period 2000-2011.

    Year

    2000

    2001

    2002

    2003

    2004

    2005

    2006

    2007

    2008

    2009

    2010

    2011




    24.7

    24.5

    24.5

    24.6

    24.7

    24.6

    25.0

    25.9

    26.3

    25.1

    25.2

    25.1

  2. The tables below show the number of new cases of HIV, AIDS, syphilis and gonorrhoea per year.


All ages

Year

 

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

 

Disease

Gender

 

 

 

 

 

HIV

Men

184

173

189

166

 

 

Women

100

85

79

76

 

AIDS

Men

14

21

17

23

 

 

Women

5

2

2

2

 

Syphilis

Men

72

111

123

106

 

 

Women

4

7

7

3

 

Gonorrhoea

Men

235

365

314

392

 

 

Women

34

47

56

51


Age group 15-24

Year

 

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

 

Disease

Gender













 

HIV

Men

 12

18 

10 

13 

 

 

Women

10

13

8

2

 

AIDS

Men

0

0

0

2

 

 

Women

1

0

0

0

 

Syphilis

Men

5

21

7

10

 

 

Women

2

4

3

0

 

Gonorrhoea

Men

61

81

67

106

 

 

Women

24

25

24

27


Age group 25-44

Year

 

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

 

Disease

Gender

 

 

 

 

 

HIV

Men

102

98

111

81

 

 

Women

64

54

58

59

 

AIDS

Men

7

9

10

16

 

 

Women

2

2

0

1

 

Syphilis

Men

49

69

79

50

 

 

Women

2

2

4

3

 

Gonorrhoea

Men

127

216

196

250

 

 

Women

8

18

25

24




  1. The table shows the number of new cases of communicable diseases.

Communicable diseases

2009

2010

2011

2012

AIDS

19

23

19

25

Botulism

-

1

-

-

Brucellosis

1

2

2

4

Campylobacteriosis

2 848

2 681

3 005

2 934

Chlamydia infection, genital

22 754

22 527

22 530

21 489

Cryptosporidosis

-

-

-

4

Diphtheria

-

-

-

-

E. coli enteritis

480

366

303

373

Echinococcosis

4

1

3

2

Encephalitis

139

174

311

270

Fleck typhus

-

-

-

-

Giardiasis

307

262

234

179

Gonorrhoea

269

412

370

443

Yellow fever

-

-

-

-

Haemorrhagic fever

-

-

-

-

Hepatitis A

40

46

22

40

Hepatitis B, acute

57

27

56

46

Hepatitis B, chronic

833

737

707

660

Hepatitis C

2 266

1 765

1 643

1 512

HIV infection

284

258

268

242

Influenza A (H1N1)

12 455

103

885

39

Pertussis

5 542

3 590

4 405

4 244

Cholera

-

-

-

-

Smallpox

-

-

-

-

Mumps

12

12

16

30

Legionellosis

34

48

33

25

Leprosy

-

1

1

-

Listeriosis

31

22

21

30

Lyme disease

273

288

247

256

Malaria

34

37

30

37

Measles

2

3

39

4

Anthrax

-

-

-

-

MRSA infection

417

431

563

575

MRSA carrier

402

478

496

635

Nephropathia epidemica

21

21

39

13

Paratyphoid fever

17

18

11

7

Plague

-

-

-

-

Poliomyelitis

-

-

-

-

Prions disease

11

5

7

9

PRP infection/carrier

8

8

3

11

Rabies

-

-

-

-

ESBLcarba-carrying Gram Negative Bacilli

-

-

-

13

Rubella

-

-

2

1

Salmonellosis

1 234

1 366

1 290

1 371

SARS

-

-

-

-

Shigellosis

153

132

163

77

Syphilis

76

118

130

109

Group A streptococcal diseases

171

159

179

137

Group B streptococcal diseases

174

166

191

203

H. influenzae infections

71

88

85

78

Meningococcal diseases

44

39

38

24

Pneumococcal diseases

798

747

728

626

Tetanus

1

-

-

1

Tuberculosis

358

336

358

378

Tularaemia

13

33

180

50

Typhoid fever

10

16

15

13

VRE infection/carrier

6

51

289

168

Yersiniosis

60

52

60

43

Total

52 729

37 650

39 977

37 460




  1. The table shows the ten leading causes of death in Norway.

The ten leading causes of death in Norway

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Heart infarction

3 775

3 707

3 380

3 340

3 209

Males

1 961

1 971

1 780

1 800

1 639

Females

1 814

1 736

1 600

1 540

1 570

Malignant neoplasm of lung

2 098

2 110

2 057

2 166

2 180

Males

1 223

1 208

1 228

1 241

1 266

Females

875

902

829

925

914

Chronic ischaemic heart disease

1 845

1 749

1 817

1 688

1 609

Males

1 017

954

996

910

935

Females

828

795

821

778

674

Unspecified pneumonia

1 829

1 625

1 671

1 498

1 549

Males

810

741

698

626

703

Females

1 019

884

973

872

846

Other chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

1 769

1 852

1 805

1 814

1 843

Males

925

997

948

956

942

Females

844

855

857

858

901

Stroke, not specified as haemorrhage or infarction

1 711

1 736

1 558

1 537

1 521

Males

583

610

531

528

546

Females

1 128

1 126

1 027

1 009

975

Heart failure

1 461

1 403

1 453

1 359

1 419

Males

580

550

541

523

526

Females

881

853

912

836

893

Senile dementia

1 293

1 343

1 397

1 509

1 562

Males

415

363

397

431

451

Females

878

980

1 000

1 078

1 111

Malignant neoplasm of colon

1 146

1 164

1 161

1 188

1 156

Males

536

541

534

559

535

Females

610

623

627

629

621

Malignant neoplasm of prostate

1 090

1 096

1 048

1 043

1 052

Males

1 090

1 096

1 048

1 043

1 052




  1. The table shows new cases of tuberculosis per 100 000 for the period 2004–2012.

Year

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012




6.6

6.3

6.4

6.5

6.6

7.5

6.9

7.4

7.6

4. National Insurance Scheme



  1. The Norwegian National Insurance Scheme is a universal scheme. This means that, as a general rule, membership in the scheme is compulsory for all those who either live or work in Norway, irrespective of nationality, place of residence, gender, age, sexual orientation, political conviction, religious belief, skin colour or whether the person in question is residing in a rural or an urban area. The scheme covers all nine traditional branches of social security set out in ILO Convention No. 102.




  1. The social insurance schemes, by definition, target all vulnerable groups, as they are all designed to alleviate living conditions for persons who have experienced one or more specified contingencies that have been found to often lead to hardship, e.g. sickness, disability, unemployment, maternity.




  1. In the following we will focus on the elderly. For a more comprehensive presentation of the Norwegian National Insurance Scheme, please see the survey entitled “The Norwegian Social Insurance Scheme”, which can be found at the following site: http://www.regjeringen.no/upload/AD/publikasjoner/veiledninger_brosjyrer/2013/Engelsk_2013.pdf




  1. Reference is also made to Norway’s latest report on the implementation of ILO Convention No. 102.




  1. The pension system has recently undergone reform. The reform has introduced the possibility of flexible drawing of old-age pensions for persons aged 62 to 75. Pensions may be drawn in full or in part. The drawing alternatives are 20, 40, 50, 60, 80 and 100%. Work and pension may be combined, with no deduction being made to the pension. Pensions drawn with effect from 2011 and later are subject to a life expectancy adjustment. A pensioner who continues to work acquires additional pension rights up to and including the year in which he or she attains the age of 75.




  1. In order to draw an old-age pension before the age of 67, acquired pension rights must be sufficient to secure a pension at the age of 67 – that is, at least equal to the minimum pension level for persons with an insurance period of 40 years.




  1. For persons born before 1954, the old-age pension consists of a residence-based basic pension, an earnings-related supplementary pension, supplements for supported spouse and children and a special supplement securing a minimum pension level for persons with little or no supplementary pension (as before). Persons born in 1963 or later are primarily granted an earnings-related pension, but a residence-based guarantee pension provides a minimum pension level (similar to the old system, but with new rules for calculation). For persons born between 1954 and 1962, one part of the pension is calculated according to the old rules and the other part according to the new rules. The latter part increases for each year after 1954 up to the person’s year of birth.




  1. According to the rules for persons born before 1954 (see above), persons who are insured for pension purposes and who have a total insurance period of minimum three years between the ages of 16 and 66 are entitled to a pension. For persons born in 1963 and later all pensionable income earned between the ages of 13 and 75 counts toward the income-based pension (no minimum requirement). However, a minimum insurance period of three years between the ages of 16 and 66 is required to be entitled to a guaranteed pension.




  1. A full pension, according to the rules for persons born before 1954, requires an insurance period of minimum 40 years. If the insurance period is shorter, the pension is proportionately reduced. The full minimum pension as of 1 May 2013 is NOK 170 496 per year for single persons and NOK 315 408 for couples (NOK 157 704 for each).




  1. Total expenditures on pensions under the National Insurance Scheme in 2012 were NOK 345 209 million. This amount represents approximately 35.4% of the combined state and national insurance budgets and 12% of GDP. The budget allocations to the national insurance scheme were NOK 96 575 million in 2012, which is equal to 28.0% of the total expenditures under the scheme.




  1. In addition to the National Insurance Scheme, a supplementary allowance scheme has been introduced. This scheme is also non-discriminatory. The purpose of the scheme is to provide financial support for elderly persons with shorter periods of insurance under the National Insurance Scheme.




  1. As mentioned above, the general National Insurance Scheme covers in principle all residents of Norway. However, because 40 years’ residence before the age of 67 is required in order to acquire a full residence-based pension, those who have lived in Norway for a shorter period may not qualify for a pension that is sufficient to live on. The new supplementary allowance scheme is intended to guarantee a minimum income for necessary means of subsistence for persons who have attained the age of 67 and who have inadequate pensions or other financial means of support because they have less than 40 years’ residence.




  1. The maximum size of the allowance corresponds to the minimum social insurance pension, see above. The allowance is subject to a strict means test and is reduced if the person or his/her spouse or cohabitant has other income from work or capital assets or a Norwegian or foreign pension. The capital assets and other property are in principle taken into account.




  1. The allowance is supplementary to the ordinary pension benefits under the National Insurance Scheme, but excludes persons who are in receipt of the ordinary full, i.e. unreduced, conventional benefit.




  1. The allowance is not conditional on a qualifying period or completed period of insurance.


5. Crime and justice

  1. In 2012 there were 164 police personnel per 100 000 inhabitants.




  1. In 2012 there were 372 regular judges and 125 deputy judges in the courts of first instance, 175 judges in the courts of second instance and 20 judges in the Supreme Court.




  1. In 2011, 278 000 persons received 317 000 sanctions, a decrease of 5.7% and 4.9%, respectively, from the previous year. In total, 6.5% of the population 15 years or older received one or more sanctions. There was a decrease in the number of sanctions imposed by the courts. Of the total number of sanctions, 284 000 concerned misdemeanours, and 28 100 persons received 330 000 sanctions for crimes.




  1. The statistics for 2011 show that 13% of all resident men over the age of 15 were sanctioned more than once, as compared with 7% of all women. Of those who were only sanctioned for misdemeanours, 74% were men, while the corresponding figure for men sanctioned for a crime was 85%. In 2011, 21 100 sanctions were imposed by the courts. The distribution of types of sanction imposed by the courts was almost the same as the previous year: 49% unconditional imprisonment, 29% conditional imprisonment, 12% community sentence and 9% fines.




  1. In 2012, an average of 3 591 persons were imprisoned in Norway, a reduction of 0.9% from the previous year but an increase of 31% from 2002. On average in 2012, 2 494 persons were convicted prisoners, 82 were held in preventive detention, 945 were remanded in custody and 70 were imprisoned for non-payment of fines. The number of convicted prisoners fell from 2011 to 2012 by 2% and the number of prisoners on remand fell by 1.5%. The number of convicted prisoners increased by 27% from 2002 to 2012, and remanded prisoners by 41%. (The proportion of foreign nationals among remands in custody in 2002 was 21.5% and in 2012 had increased to 53.6%.) The proportion of female prisoners has remained fairly stable in recent years, at 5.6% of the prison population in 2012 as opposed to 6% in 2011 and 5.3% in 2002. Fifty-one young persons (under 18 years) were imprisoned in 2012, 58 in 2011, 64 in 2010, 80 in 2009 and 59 in 2005.8




  1. In 2012, 273 000 crimes and 120 000 misdemeanours were reported to the police, an increase of 3.6% from 2011. There was a considerable increase in traffic misdemeanours (6.3%), offences for profit (4.7%) and narcotics crimes (7.3%). In 2012, 26 700 threats and other violent offences were reported to the police, almost 2% more than in the previous year. When the population increase is taken into account, the proportion of violent offences reported to the police has remained relatively stable since the turn of the millennium, about 5.4 per 1 000 inhabitants. In the last few years prior to 2012, the number of threats reported to the police has shown little change.




  1. Norway has abolished the death penalty for all crimes both in peace and in war time.




  1. More than 4 700 sexual offences were reported to the police in 2012. In 2012, 874 incidents of sexual intercourse with children and 124 incidents of incest (the same level as in the previous nine years) were reported to the police,.




  1. Theft and other offences for profit made up almost 46% of crimes reported to the police in 2012. Almost 180 000 incidents of larceny and other offences for profit were reported to the police in 2012. After a general decline, there was an increase in several types of theft reported. These included theft from cafes and restaurants, bicycle theft and theft from shops. The total number of incidents of aggravated larceny from a person in a public place was 4 500 higher in 2012 than in 2011, and 9 600 higher than in 2010. Oslo contributed strongly to the increase in the total numbers of larcenies in Norway for 2012.




  1. Six deaths were registered in prison in 2012. Six prisoner deaths were registered outside prison (on the way to hospital or on leave).



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